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WORLD
December 7, 2009 | By Paul Richter
Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates denied Sunday that President Obama had set an "exit strategy" for Afghanistan, and he forecast that only a "handful" of U.S. troops may leave the country in July 2011, when a withdrawal is due to begin. Gates, appearing on television news programs with other senior U.S. officials, said the Obama administration intended to maintain its commitment to Afghanistan while gradually shifting security responsibilities to the country's central government. "This is a transition," Gates said on ABC's "This Week."
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2014 | By Ed Stockly
Customized TV Listings are available here: www.latimes.com/tvtimes Click here to download TV listings for the week of Jan. 19 - 25, 2014 in PDF format This week's TV Movies     SERIES MythBusters This new episode tests a few Hollywood crash clichés. 8 p.m. Discovery When Calls the Heart The mining company wants the town's widows to get out of town to make room for new miners, but Elizabeth (Erin Krakow) comes up with a plan that she thinks will allow the widows to stay in their homes.
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WORLD
January 22, 2010 | By Julian E. Barnes and Mark Magnier
Reporting from New Delhi and Islamabad Mark Magnier -- Using a mixture of praise and pressure, Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates asked Pakistan government officials today to build on their offensives against militants at the same time he tried to reassure a skeptical Pakistani public about American aims in the region. On his first day of a visit to Pakistan, Gates announced the U.S. would provide unmanned aerial drones to the Pakistani military--a longstanding request of Islamabad that America has previously balked at. Defense officials said the U.S. would give Pakistan 12 Shadow UAVs, unarmed surveillance drones that can be used to spy on militants.
OPINION
January 16, 2014 | By Andrew Gawthorpe
In his memoir, former Secretary of Defense Robert Gates reveals how unhappy he was to be leading the Pentagon in the Bush and Obama administrations. He was mad at Congress, furious with the White House and outraged by Pentagon bureaucrats. In fact, some days he was so angry he wasn't sure he could take it anymore. "All too often during my 4 1/2 years as secretary of Defense, when I found myself sitting yet again at that witness table at yet another congressional hearing, I was tempted to stand up, slam the briefing book shut and quit on the spot," Gates writes in one of the excerpts from his book that was made public before the book's release.
NEWS
October 19, 1991
Here is how the Senate Intelligence Committee voted on the nomination of Robert M. Gates as director of the CIA: Democrats for--David L. Boren (Okla.), Sam Nunn (Ga.), Alan Cranston (Calif.), John Glenn (Ohio) Republicans for--Frank H. Murkowski (Alaska), John W. Warner (Va.), Warren B. Rudman (N.H.), Slade Gorton (Wash.), John H. Chafee (R.I.), Alfonse M. D'Amato (N.Y.), John C. Danforth (Mo.) Democrats against--Ernest F. Hollings (S.C.), Bill Bradley (N.J.), Dennis DeConcini (Ariz.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1991 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rep. Anthony C. Beilenson (D-Los Angeles), a former chairman of the House intelligence committee, said he opposes the confirmation of Robert M. Gates, President Bush's nominee to head the CIA. Beilenson, who chaired the oversight committee until January, said in an interview that he was deeply troubled by allegations that Gates improperly slanted intelligence assessments regarding the Soviet Union and Iran when he was deputy CIA director.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1987
A Times article (Editorial Pages, April 1), "Iran Affair Was Standard Fare," Robert Morris inaccurately stated: " . . . the nomination of CIA Deputy Director Robert Gates to succeed the ailing William J. Casey had to be withdrawn after it was revealed that Gates, in a 1985 memo to the White House, formally and enthusiastically favored the arms deal with Iran." In the first place, Gates' nomination was not withdrawn for the reasons Morris cites. In his public statement dated March 2, Gates said that no one asked him to withdraw his nomination and that President Reagan had never ceased his support of it. Gates took the initiative himself to ask the President to withdraw the nomination, believing that while he probably would ultimately have been confirmed, a protracted struggle with Congress over the matter would damage the agency and intelligence community and prevent them from getting on with their important tasks.
NEWS
October 17, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert M. Gates, on the first visit by a CIA director to Moscow, told Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin on Friday about one of the U.S. intelligence coups of the Cold War--the raising of a Soviet submarine by the spy ship Glomar Explorer, Russian sources said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1991 | GEORGE BLACK, George Black is foreign editor of the Nation
"Iron Feliks" Dzerzhinsky has been dragged from his pedestal in the Moscow square that once bore his name. The KBG is under new command. And in a final symbolic act of surrender in the Cold War, Mikhail Gorbachev now proposes to cut Cuba adrift and dismantle the electronic listening post at Lourdes, just outside Havana.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1991 | BOBBY INMAN and RUSS BRUEMMER, Retired Adm. Bobby Inman, former deputy CIA director and director of the National Security Agency, is acting chairman of the President's foreign intelligence advisory board. Russ Bruemmer, now in private law practice, was director in 1987-88 of the CIA special counsel reviewing the CIA role in Iran-Contra
The U.S. intelligence community faces a daunting array of tasks in the 1990s. Despite democratic reforms, the Soviet Union continues to control the world's second-most-advanced arsenal of strategic nuclear weapons and the world's largest standing army. Eastern and Central Europe are undergoing changes that were unthinkable a few years ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2014 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Former Secretary of Defense Robert Gates appeared on "The Daily Show With Jon Stewart" on Wednesday to discuss his new memoir, "Duty," which has stirred up the Washington chattering class for its criticisms of President Obama. Gates arrived wearing a very visible neck brace, which Stewart couldn't help but reference. "Apparently you wrote about Chris Christie and there was retribution," Stewart said. Gates actually suffered a fall on New Year's Day in his home in Washington State and fractured his first vertebrae.
OPINION
January 12, 2014 | By Sarah Chayes
In a dozen years of war, Americans have grown used to improvised explosive devices. The detonations have rocked the streets of Kabul and Baghdad - and also of Washington. Only, in Washington, the bombshells appear in print. The latest domestic blast, a diatribe called "Duty" by former Secretary of Defense Robert Gates, seems to have startled even the dean of White House correspondents. "It is rare for a former Cabinet member," wrote Bob Woodward in the Washington Post, "let alone a Defense secretary ... to publish such an antagonistic portrait of a sitting president.
NEWS
January 7, 2014 | By David S. Cloud, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
WASHINGTON - President Obama became progressively more pessimistic about prospects for a successful ending to the war in Afghanistan, goaded by inexperienced White House advisors and a dislike of Afghan President Hamid Karzai , according to his former Defense secretary, Robert M. Gates. In a forthcoming memoir that mixes strong praise with scathing criticism for Obama and his administration, Gates says Obama doubted his own policy after he decided to send 30,000 more troops to Afghanistan early in his first term.
OPINION
June 26, 2011
Our leaders are not held in particularly high regard these days. Corruption, venality, ideological rigidity and self-serving politics have helped create a national atmosphere of discord and divisiveness and have helped push politicians and government officials down, down, down in the polls. So it is worth taking note of Robert Gates, the U.S. secretary of Defense since late 2006, who is stepping down this week. Gates, a 67-year-old former CIA director, served in his current job under two presidents: George W. Bush and Barack Obama.
NATIONAL
June 22, 2011 | By Lisa Mascaro and Ken Dilanian, Washington Bureau
The Senate unanimously confirmed Leon E. Panetta as secretary of Defense on Tuesday, putting the Pentagon in the hands of a former Democratic congressman and budget expert amid growing political discontent over the cost and reach of President Obama's military engagements. Panetta, who spent two years as director of the Central Intelligence Agency, will replace Robert M. Gates, who is retiring after serving in two consecutive administrations. In a statement, Panetta thanked the Senate "for the strong vote of confidence" and said he was "deeply honored" by the 100-0 tally and the president's nomination.
OPINION
June 21, 2011
Heartfelt duty Re "Gates fought, and wept, for troops," June 19 Outgoing Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates deserves the highest honor our country can bestow for services rendered above and beyond the call of duty. Here we have an individual who, because of the nature of his job, has armored his heart to face the ugly realities of war but could not prevent that heart from bleeding when faced with the precious loss of our country's sons and daughters. I know I would not want to be in his shoes penning all those letters meant to console grieving families.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1993 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles County health director came under blistering criticism Tuesday for failing to inform the Board of Supervisors until recently about the potential failure of a $65-million computerized billing system. But after upbraiding Health Services Director Robert C. Gates for failing to disclose severe problems with the computer system, the Board of Supervisors then participated in what critics called another cover-up by ordering a secret report on the reasons the problems occurred.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1991 | ALEXANDER COCKBURN, Alexander Cockburn writes for the Nation and other publications
My hope all along has been that the Senate, in a moment of confusion, would do the right thing and confirm Clarence Thomas as Director of Central Intelligence, putting Robert Gates on the Supreme Court. The CIA would be an ideal harbor for a man of eccentric ideology such as Thomas; Gates would blend in on the highest bench somewhere between Anthony M. Kennedy and Antonin Scalia, with his clerks instructing him in elementary principles of law. Thomas drives a late-model Corvette.
NATIONAL
June 18, 2011 | By David S. Cloud, Washington Bureau
When Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates leaves the Pentagon every evening, he carries home a sheaf of documents about the latest American soldiers killed in Afghanistan and Iraq. After dinner, usually alone, he takes out a pen and writes notes to the families of the fallen. And most nights, he weeps. He has signed about 3,400 condolence letters since taking over the Pentagon in late 2006, aides say. "There's probably not a day in the last four years that I haven't wept, and it's mostly when I'm doing those letters," Gates said in an interview.
OPINION
June 14, 2011
NATO on the defensive Re "Gates faults NATO allies' resolve," June 11 Could it be that it is the United States that is pushing "toward collective military irrelevance" by continuing to interfere militarily in other nations' business? If the U.S. is so tired of engaging in expensive combat missions for and with those who "don't want to share the risks and the costs," perhaps it should reexamine its priorities. Maybe it is we who are out of step. It is disturbing that outgoing Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates would criticize other countries for their unwillingness to spend blood and treasure joining this country in the military exercises that are bankrupting us. Our leaders should look to the example of Germany, a country that provides education and medical care and refuses to join NATO in its most recent foray into Libya.
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