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Robert Gettlin

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June 23, 1991 | Robert Scheer, Scheer is a Times national correspondent
Is it possible that Richard Nixon was hounded out of office not primarily because of his chicanery but rather for being an architect of peace who angered the national- security establishment? Was Al Haig acting as the military complex's representative in the White House, directing a secret spying operation of the Joint Chiefs against the President?
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June 23, 1991 | Robert Scheer, Scheer is a Times national correspondent
Is it possible that Richard Nixon was hounded out of office not primarily because of his chicanery but rather for being an architect of peace who angered the national- security establishment? Was Al Haig acting as the military complex's representative in the White House, directing a secret spying operation of the Joint Chiefs against the President?
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May 22, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Howls of denial and disbelief are greeting "Silent Coup: The Removal of a President," a new book that purports to reveal secrets of the Watergate scandal. Chief among the critics is former Washington Post reporter Carl Bernstein, who with Bob Woodward played a major role in breaking the Watergate story. He said that the claim made in the book, written by Len Colodny and Robert Gettlin, that Alexander M. Haig Jr., once President Richard M.
NEWS
May 22, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Howls of denial and disbelief are greeting "Silent Coup: The Removal of a President," a new book that purports to reveal secrets of the Watergate scandal. Chief among the critics is former Washington Post reporter Carl Bernstein, who with Bob Woodward played a major role in breaking the Watergate story. He said that the claim made in the book, written by Len Colodny and Robert Gettlin, that Alexander M. Haig Jr., once President Richard M.
NEWS
May 21, 1991 | From Associated Press
Former White House counsel John W. Dean III, President Richard M. Nixon's main accuser in the Watergate scandal, actually initiated the break-in himself and masterminded the cover-up without consulting his superiors, a book released Monday charges. The authors of "Silent Coup: The Removal of a President" charge that Dean was motivated by a desire to collect dirt on the Democrats to boost his influence in the White House.
NEWS
August 7, 1994 | ROBERT KOEHLER, Robert Koehler is a frequent contributor to TV Times and Calendar
The final surprise of Richard Nixon's career might well have taken place after his death April 22. Instead of being lambasted with vituperative op-ed memoirs and obits, Nixon was memorialized as a complicated politician with as many gifts as flaws. Several writers even suggested that Nixon's efforts to ratchet down the Cold War pressure and open doors to China would overshadow Watergate.
NEWS
April 27, 1994 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Richard Nixon decided to have a secret recording system installed in the White House, he figured the tapes of important meetings would prove invaluable in preparing books he might write after leaving office. "From the beginning," Nixon wrote in his memoirs, "I had decided that my Administration would be the best chronicled in history." But the now-infamous tapes, which helped lead to his downfall, wound up providing more of a presidential chronicle than he bargained for.
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November 24, 1991 | Kevin P. Phillips, Phillips, who worked for Richard Nixon in the 1968 GOP campaign, is the editor-publisher of the American Political Report
In both tenacity and perspicacity, Richard Nixon's political re-emergence over the last 14 years has proven as extraordinary as his earlier success at hauling himself back from defeat in the 1962 California gubernatorial race and going on to win the presidency (on his second try) in 1968. Historians and journalists are only just beginning to deal with the forces and circumstances involved. In "Why Americans Hate Politics," political writer E. J.
NEWS
May 21, 1991 | From Associated Press
Former White House counsel John W. Dean III, President Richard M. Nixon's main accuser in the Watergate scandal, actually initiated the break-in himself and masterminded the cover-up without consulting his superiors, a book released Monday charges. The authors of "Silent Coup: The Removal of a President" charge that Dean was motivated by a desire to collect dirt on the Democrats to boost his influence in the White House.
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