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Robert Gilman

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NEWS
March 30, 1990 | CONNIE KOENENN
Robert Gilman, 44, was trained at Berkeley and Princeton as an astrophysicist, but after a few years of teaching and research, he decided "that the stars could wait, but the planet couldn't." So he shook off an academic career and cast his lot with the planet. He and his wife, Diane, moved from Massachusetts to the Northwest, built a solar house and "committed ourselves to the challenges of adjusting to life on a small planet."
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BUSINESS
August 25, 1991 | GREGORY CROUCH, ANNE MICHAUD and TIMES STAFF WRITERS
One financial planner took the stage and was about to tell the 45 or so people in the hotel audience how he once made a fortune selling FundAmerica memberships. Then he caught himself, realizing that this was supposed to be the new and improved FundAmerica. "We can't talk numbers any more, can we?" he asked another salesman. So he fudged things a tad: "Let's say that my income in a couple of years was more than most people make in their whole lives," he said. They're baaaaack.
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BUSINESS
August 25, 1991 | GREGORY CROUCH, ANNE MICHAUD and TIMES STAFF WRITERS
One financial planner took the stage and was about to tell the 45 or so people in the hotel audience how he once made a fortune selling FundAmerica memberships. Then he caught himself, realizing that this was supposed to be the new and improved FundAmerica. "We can't talk numbers any more, can we?" he asked another salesman. So he fudged things a tad: "Let's say that my income in a couple of years was more than most people make in their whole lives," he said. They're baaaaack.
NEWS
March 30, 1990 | CONNIE KOENENN
Robert Gilman, 44, was trained at Berkeley and Princeton as an astrophysicist, but after a few years of teaching and research, he decided "that the stars could wait, but the planet couldn't." So he shook off an academic career and cast his lot with the planet. He and his wife, Diane, moved from Massachusetts to the Northwest, built a solar house and "committed ourselves to the challenges of adjusting to life on a small planet."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2000 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It could only happen in a community theater: Before Sunday's performance of the Marc Camoletti farce, "Don't Dress for Dinner," Woodland Hills Community Theatre director Jon Berry announced to the crowd that it was his wife Judy's birthday and she was due to arrive any minute. Just then, Judy entered and was greeted with a spontaneous group sing of "Happy Birthday."
HEALTH
July 16, 2007 | Mary Beckman, Special to The Times
Georgia attorney Andrew Speaker shocked many people by traveling internationally with a form of tuberculosis that can't be cured easily. Tests on his TB from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta and Denver's National Jewish Medical and Research Center indicated different levels of drug resistance, with the initial CDC testing indicating that Speaker had the most serious form of the disease, known as extensively drug-resistant (XDR) TB.
NEWS
December 5, 2001 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bulbs are up. Convertible tops are down. Ice cream cone sales are soaring. Dogs and cats are shedding. Around New England, the signs of spring are everywhere. And so are Christmas wreaths, a curious contradiction in a region that equates rugged winters with moral superiority, physical fortitude--and most of all, normality. Throughout the region, a wild and wacky weather pattern has taken over, transforming snowbound assumptions into sun-streaked fantasies.
BUSINESS
January 26, 1994 | MICHAEL FLAGG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A company accused of defrauding investors has pleaded no contest to a single felony charge in a deal with Florida prosecutors. The company, Irvine's defunct FundAmerica Inc., must pay a $200,000 fine but avoids a criminal trial. Florida's attorney general contended that FundAmerica was a pyramid scheme--a company that spent more time signing up new members for a fee than actually selling products.
NEWS
October 31, 1989 | CONNIE KOENENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It started about a year ago on a small scale: a landscape architect offering a workshop on "Sustainable Gardening," an environmental architect giving a lecture on "Sustainable Housing," an engineer demonstrating a solar collector system for "Sustainable Heating." Suddenly "sustainable" activities were blooming all over the Southern California landscape.
BUSINESS
August 25, 1991 | GREGORY CROUCH and ANNE MICHAUD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
One financial planner took the stage and was about to tell the 45 or so people in the hotel audience how he once made a fortune selling FundAmerica memberships. Then he caught himself, realizing that this was supposed to be the new and improved FundAmerica. "We can't talk numbers any more, can we?" he asked another salesman. So he fudged things a tad: "Let's say that my income in a couple of years was more than most people make in their whole lives," he said. They're baaaaack.
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