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Robert Gottlieb

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BOOKS
January 9, 1994 | Ronald Brownstein, Ronald Brownstein is a Times staff writer.
Taken together, "Forcing the Spring" and "Not in Our Backyard" represent a policy junkie's Whole Earth Catalogue: They offer a panoramic compilation of the environmental critique of contemporary American society. It's a critique of striking breadth. At any given moment, lobbyists, scientists and lawyers marching under the green banner are challenging how we grow and distribute food; heat our homes, power our factories and fuel our cars; use natural lands; dispose of wastes in water, air and land; treat other species; and manage new technologies, from nuclear power to genetic engineering.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2011 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Most Beautiful Walk in the World A Pedestrian in Paris John Baxter Harper Perennial: 336 pp., $14.99 "Paris belongs to its piétons — the pedestrians. One goes naturally à pied — on foot. And it's only on foot that you discover its richness and variety," explains John Baxter, who has written many books on Paris, reading, cooking, movies and sex. Perhaps his Francophilia began when he married a French woman, or perhaps earlier when he first read Hemingway (although "read" seems too tame a word for a man who seems to have devoured the work)
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SPORTS
November 21, 1987
Is the rumor that UCLA, in its long frustrated quest for a national championship, intends to add those intersectional powerhouses Caltech and Pomona to its schedule. This will complement Long Beach State, Fresno State and San Diego State and give UCLA a chance for another Heisman award (the first and only being over 20 years ago). ROBERT GOTTLIEB Monterey Park
BOOKS
October 24, 2004 | Mindy Aloff, Mindy Aloff is a consultant to the George Balanchine Foundation. Her writing on dance has appeared in many publications internationally.
The birth of George Balanchine (1904-83), one of the most famous choreographers in history, has been the subject of international celebrations this year, and for good reason. Over much of the past century, his work was all over the place: in the repertories of ballet companies, in operas, in movies, in Broadway shows, on television. (Some of his ballets even survive today, reasonably intact.) His views on how ballet should be taught have helped change the way dancers look and move.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1998
"Sierra Club Wrestles the Nativism in Environmentalism," by Robert Gottlieb and Peter Dreier (Opinion, March 1), paints a false picture of a movement, and particularly the Sierra Club, as racist. In fact, the Sierra Club is motivated by concerns for the health of a nation. Population growth is caused by all people. The authors are continuing to foist the lie that we are "elitists." This implies that we are upper-class, "melanophobic" whites when, in fact, we are overwhelmingly middle class, represented by all races.
NEWS
July 1, 1992 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a major publishing shake-up, Tina Brown, editor of Vanity Fair, will relinquish her post and take over the venerable but troubled New Yorker this fall, it was announced Tuesday. Robert Gottlieb, current editor-in-chief of the New Yorker, said he was stepping down because of "conceptual differences" over the magazine's future with S.I. (Si) Newhouse, the media tycoon whose family owns both publications.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2011 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Most Beautiful Walk in the World A Pedestrian in Paris John Baxter Harper Perennial: 336 pp., $14.99 "Paris belongs to its piétons — the pedestrians. One goes naturally à pied — on foot. And it's only on foot that you discover its richness and variety," explains John Baxter, who has written many books on Paris, reading, cooking, movies and sex. Perhaps his Francophilia began when he married a French woman, or perhaps earlier when he first read Hemingway (although "read" seems too tame a word for a man who seems to have devoured the work)
BOOKS
November 27, 1988 | William Kahrl, Kahrl, an associate editor at the Sacramento Bee, is the editor of "The California Water Atlas" and the author of "Water and Power." and
Like the Red Queen in Alice's Wonderland, Robert Gottlieb asks us to believe any number of impossible things as he guides us through the no less peculiar world of Western water politics.
BOOKS
October 24, 2004 | Mindy Aloff, Mindy Aloff is a consultant to the George Balanchine Foundation. Her writing on dance has appeared in many publications internationally.
The birth of George Balanchine (1904-83), one of the most famous choreographers in history, has been the subject of international celebrations this year, and for good reason. Over much of the past century, his work was all over the place: in the repertories of ballet companies, in operas, in movies, in Broadway shows, on television. (Some of his ballets even survive today, reasonably intact.) His views on how ballet should be taught have helped change the way dancers look and move.
NEWS
August 20, 2001 | LINTON WEEKS, WASHINGTON POST
Robert A. Gottlieb, editor at large at Alfred A. Knopf publishing company, has the golden touch. When Bill Clinton handpicked Gottlieb, 70, recently to edit his memoirs, the former president selected someone who possesses both a world-class literary reputation and a keen knack for raking in big bucks. A master of personal quirkiness, Gottlieb "dresses like the biggest shlumpf in the world," said someone who knows him. Others say he edits while sitting cross-legged on the floor.
NEWS
August 20, 2001 | LINTON WEEKS, WASHINGTON POST
Robert A. Gottlieb, editor at large at Alfred A. Knopf publishing company, has the golden touch. When Bill Clinton handpicked Gottlieb, 70, recently to edit his memoirs, the former president selected someone who possesses both a world-class literary reputation and a keen knack for raking in big bucks. A master of personal quirkiness, Gottlieb "dresses like the biggest shlumpf in the world," said someone who knows him. Others say he edits while sitting cross-legged on the floor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1998
"Sierra Club Wrestles the Nativism in Environmentalism," by Robert Gottlieb and Peter Dreier (Opinion, March 1), paints a false picture of a movement, and particularly the Sierra Club, as racist. In fact, the Sierra Club is motivated by concerns for the health of a nation. Population growth is caused by all people. The authors are continuing to foist the lie that we are "elitists." This implies that we are upper-class, "melanophobic" whites when, in fact, we are overwhelmingly middle class, represented by all races.
BOOKS
January 9, 1994 | Ronald Brownstein, Ronald Brownstein is a Times staff writer.
Taken together, "Forcing the Spring" and "Not in Our Backyard" represent a policy junkie's Whole Earth Catalogue: They offer a panoramic compilation of the environmental critique of contemporary American society. It's a critique of striking breadth. At any given moment, lobbyists, scientists and lawyers marching under the green banner are challenging how we grow and distribute food; heat our homes, power our factories and fuel our cars; use natural lands; dispose of wastes in water, air and land; treat other species; and manage new technologies, from nuclear power to genetic engineering.
NEWS
July 1, 1992 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a major publishing shake-up, Tina Brown, editor of Vanity Fair, will relinquish her post and take over the venerable but troubled New Yorker this fall, it was announced Tuesday. Robert Gottlieb, current editor-in-chief of the New Yorker, said he was stepping down because of "conceptual differences" over the magazine's future with S.I. (Si) Newhouse, the media tycoon whose family owns both publications.
BOOKS
November 27, 1988 | William Kahrl, Kahrl, an associate editor at the Sacramento Bee, is the editor of "The California Water Atlas" and the author of "Water and Power." and
Like the Red Queen in Alice's Wonderland, Robert Gottlieb asks us to believe any number of impossible things as he guides us through the no less peculiar world of Western water politics.
SPORTS
November 21, 1987
Is the rumor that UCLA, in its long frustrated quest for a national championship, intends to add those intersectional powerhouses Caltech and Pomona to its schedule. This will complement Long Beach State, Fresno State and San Diego State and give UCLA a chance for another Heisman award (the first and only being over 20 years ago). ROBERT GOTTLIEB Monterey Park
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1990
The Times is to be congratulated for choosing to begin the new decade with Robert Gottlieb's excellent column on the environmental consequences of ending the Cold War ("An Opportunity for Greener Politics," Op-Ed Page, Jan. 1). I strongly suspect that when historians look back on the 1980s, they will see in the emergence of Germany's Greens the color of "Peace on Earth" during the 21st Century. AUSTIN GALLAHER Pacific Beach
BUSINESS
September 7, 2000 | Claudia Eller
Longtime New York literary agent Robert Gottlieb, who in recent weeks lost his biggest client--author Tom Clancy--after 18 years, is leaving William Morris Agency. Gottlieb, a Morris board member and head of the agency's New York literary department, plans to start his own agency.
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