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Robert Graham

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NEWS
February 18, 1997 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Robert Klark Graham, 90, a millionaire optometrist who founded the world's most discriminating sperm bank to nurture what he believed were the human seeds of genius, has died. He died Thursday in Seattle while attending the annual meeting of the American Assn. for the Advancement of Science. He was found in his hotel room bathtub after hitting his head in a fall, his wife, Marta Everton Graham, said.
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BUSINESS
April 19, 2014 | By Lauren Beale
Actress Anjelica Huston has parted with the five-story contemporary live/work home in Venice that she shared with her late husband, sculptor Robert Graham, for $11.15 million. The 13,796 square feet of loft-like space, some 200 feet from the sand, includes a 10,000-square-foot art studio that was used by Graham, a dance studio, a gym, a library/study, a media room, an office, three bedrooms and 3.5 bathrooms. The home and studio share a central courtyard shaded by a coral tree.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2009
Funeral services for sculptor Robert Graham will be held at 9:30 a.m. today at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels, 555 W. Temple St., Los Angeles. Cardinal Roger M. Mahony will preside at the Mass. Graham's family suggests that contributions in memory of the artist, who died on Dec. 27 at 70, may be sent to Homeboy Industries, Development Department, 130 W. Bruno St., Los Angeles, CA 90012.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2013 | By Jason La
Mark Englert photographed a statue by Robert Graham , titled, "Torso," at the corner of Rodeo Drive and Dayton Way in Beverly Hills on June 29. "I've been a big fan of Robert Graham since his male and female torsos were installed at the Coliseum for the '84 Olympics!" Englert said. He used a Nikon D300. Each week, we're featuring photos of Southern California submitted by readers. Share your photos on our  Flickr page  or  reader submission gallery .  Follow us on Twitter  or visit  latimes.com/socalmoments  for more on this photo series.
NEWS
February 15, 1997
The Rev. Robert Graham, 84, a Jesuit priest and historian who specialized in Vatican diplomacy during World War II. Graham dedicated his career to poring over documents in the Vatican's archives to try to shed light on a question that fellow historians have wrestled with for decades: did the Holy See, and specifically Pope Pius XII, make adequate attempts to save Jews and combat Nazism and Fascism.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2012 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
The Venice art studio and residence of actress Anjelica Huston and her late husband, sculptor Robert Graham , is on the market for $13.9 million. Near the sand and overlooking the ocean, the live/work space includes three bedrooms and 31/2 bathrooms in 13,796 square feet. Features include a dance studio, a gym, a media room, an office and a service entrance. The five-story structure was built in 1994. There is a heated pool and parking for 10 cars. Huston, 60, is a regular on the TV show "Smash" and had a recurring role on "Medium" from 2008 to 2009.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2007 | Diane Haithman
AN odd development for a neighborhood where a bikini with roller blades is standard attire: In 2005, a handful of Venice residents protested plans to erect a nude female torso by Venice artist Robert Graham in the middle of Windward Circle. Staunch feminists and conservative church leaders formed an unexpected bond in protest. One businesswoman deplored the sculpture as "a shiny sexual object."
MAGAZINE
December 7, 2003 | LOUISE ROUG
Inside a Venice studio one block from the beach, architect Frank Gehry sits in a corner, naked from the waist up. Nearby is artist Ed Moses, wearing only suspenders. Both are busts, recent sculptures by Robert Graham. Gehry and Moses are longtime friends of Graham. With Ed Ruscha, Billy Al Bengston, Kenneth Price, Chuck Arnoldi, Larry Bell, Peter Alexander and Tony Berlant, they were part of a creative group who worked and played in Venice beginning in the 1960s and '70s.
NEWS
May 23, 1995 | KATHRYN BOLD
Sculptor Robert Graham received an award from the Newport Harbor Art Museum board of trustees at the Art of Dining VIII on Sunday. Graham, best known for his monumental public artworks such as the towering "Olympic Gateway" figures for the 1984 games in Los Angeles, attended with his wife, Anjelica Huston. Graham and Huston joined 430 guests at the Four Seasons Hotel in Newport Beach for an "exhibition of culinary art" by leading chefs of the West Coast.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2008 | David Pagel, Special to The Times
Over the last 35 years or so, Robert Graham has made a name for himself sculpting super-realistic bronze nudes.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2012 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
The Venice art studio and residence of actress Anjelica Huston and her late husband, sculptor Robert Graham , is on the market for $13.9 million. Near the sand and overlooking the ocean, the live/work space includes three bedrooms and 31/2 bathrooms in 13,796 square feet. Features include a dance studio, a gym, a media room, an office and a service entrance. The five-story structure was built in 1994. There is a heated pool and parking for 10 cars. Huston, 60, is a regular on the TV show "Smash" and had a recurring role on "Medium" from 2008 to 2009.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2011 | Claudia Luther, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Jerry Leiber, who with his songwriting partner, Mike Stoller, created a songbook that infused the rock 'n' roll scene of the 1950s and early '60s with energy and mischievous humor, has died. He was 78. Leiber, the words half of the duo, died Monday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles of cardiopulmonary failure, said Randy Poe, president of the songwriters' music publishing company. Inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1985 and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1987, Leiber and his lifelong writing partner, Stoller, wrote hits that included Elvis Presley's rat-a-tat-tat rendition of "Hound Dog" in 1956 and Peggy Lee's 1969 recording of the jaded "Is That All There Is?"
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2009 | Suzanne Muchnic
A hushed throng of artists, arts patrons and civic leaders joined friends and family of the late sculptor Robert Graham at a funeral Mass on Wednesday morning at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels. Filing through the cathedral's "Great Bronze Doors," which Graham considered his greatest public commission, the crowd came to mourn the loss and celebrate the life of a creative force who died at 70 on Dec. 27 after a long illness. Los Angeles' leading public artist, Graham is probably best known for sculptural monuments in prominent locations across the country, including tributes to Franklin D. Roosevelt in Washington, Joe Louis in Detroit, Duke Ellington in New York and Charlie "Bird" Parker in Kansas City, Mo. But his most enduring subject was the female nude, which he explored in hundreds of works, large and small, throughout his long career.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2009
Funeral services for sculptor Robert Graham will be held at 9:30 a.m. today at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels, 555 W. Temple St., Los Angeles. Cardinal Roger M. Mahony will preside at the Mass. Graham's family suggests that contributions in memory of the artist, who died on Dec. 27 at 70, may be sent to Homeboy Industries, Development Department, 130 W. Bruno St., Los Angeles, CA 90012.
OPINION
January 3, 2009 | TIM RUTTEN
Though every artist's death diminishes us, Robert Graham's loss impoverishes Los Angeles in a deep and particular way. Graham, who died last Saturday at the age of 70 after a serious illness, was not simply the city's premier public artist, he was a sculptor whose works reflected the subtle spirit of Los Angeles itself.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 2008 | Hector Becerra, Times Staff Writer
After he sank into depression in the early 1980s and lost his job at the old Ambassador Hotel, his sisters got him to see a therapist. But it didn't work. In desperation, they tried to get him committed, but he skipped out. And so John Robert McGraham's sisters settled into a pattern: visiting their brother on the streets of Mid-Wilshire whenever they could. They brought him food, money and clothing. They brought their children to see their "Uncle Johnny."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1992 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
A new item at the Museum of Contemporary Art's gift shop appears to be the work of Robert Graham. The 11-inch-tall bronze, composed of a nude female torso on a textured cylinder, exemplifies the elegant form and technical perfection that characterize the renowned Los Angeles artist's sculpture. Indeed, the limited-production bronze is a Graham, but it's also the work of seven former Los Angeles gang members who had never seen the inside of a famous artist's studio until a few months ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2005 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
Four outdoor sculptures by Venice artist Robert Graham have been toppled from their pedestals and damaged on campus at UCLA, the university said Wednesday. Carol Stogsdill, the university's director of media relations, confirmed that the pieces were vandalized and that three sustained extensive damage in the incident, believed to have occurred late Monday or early Tuesday. The four works are in the Rolfe Courtyard, along with six other Graham sculptures that were not damaged.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2008 | David Pagel, Special to The Times
Over the last 35 years or so, Robert Graham has made a name for himself sculpting super-realistic bronze nudes.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2007 | Alex Chun
FOR more than 40 years, Robert Graham has created provocative figurative works, relying on live models as inspiration. So in describing his latest exhibition at the USC Fisher Gallery -- more than 100 paintings and sculptures of the female form, all spawned from small clay figures created by hand in a matter of seconds, then recast in bronze and silver -- he says paradoxically, "It's actually the same work I've always been doing, only it's different."
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