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Robert Graves

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November 12, 1989 | CHARLES SOLOMON
The popular BBC dramatization starring Derek Jacobi has renewed interest in Robert Graves' historical novels. Although entertaining and generally well-researched, Graves' depiction of Roman history is not universally accepted by historians and should be taken with a grain of salt. His characterizations of the various members of the Imperial Family, including the scurrilous portrait of Tiberius, are taken from "The 12 Caesars" of Suetonius, who had a number of political axes to grind.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz and Rong-Gong Lin II
The magnitude 4.4 earthquake that struck near Westwood is the most significant shake in Southern California since a 5.5 earthquake hit Chino Hills in 2008, a U.S. Geological Survey seismologist told reporters at a news conference Monday morning. Robert Graves said there have been at least six aftershocks since the 6:25 a.m. earthquake. The largest so far has been a magnitude 2.7 earthquake that struck five miles northwest of Westwood. Graves said there is always the small possibility that the 4.4 earthquake was only a prelude to an equal or stronger shake.
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NEWS
December 8, 1985 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Robert Graves, whose voluminous output of poems, books and essays made him an icon among the literati but who was better known to the public as the author of two eminently successful volumes about the Roman emperor Claudius, died Saturday at the age of 90. The perspicacious biographer and translator died in his villa, surrounded by citrus orchards, on Spain's Mediterranean island of Majorca, where he had spent most of his life save for a few brief periods away in his native Britain.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
It's been more than 31/2 politically and culturally eventful decades since the BBC debuted "I, Claudius," the now iconic political drama set in ancient Rome that shocked and amazed audiences, first in the United Kingdom and then the United States. The recent release of an anniversary-edition DVD reminded many that no matter how many naked breasts, bloody beheadings or incestuous liaisons"Game of Thrones" or"The Borgias" serve up, no matter how much spiritual and political rot is examined by"Breaking Bad" or "Homeland," there is no topping the vicious intrigues, vindictive violence and general depravity of Rome as depicted first by novelist and historian Robert Graves and then by screenwriter Jack Pullman and director Herbert Wise.
BOOKS
January 7, 1996 | Amy Gerstler, Amy Gerstler's most recent book of poems is called "Nerve Storm" (Viking Penguin)
Since the age of 15, poetry has been my ruling passion and I have never intentionally undertaken any task or formed any relationship that seemed inconsistent with poetic principles, which has sometimes won me the reputation of an eccentric. --Robert Graves **** Biographers are often compelled to act like vultures, waiting till the objects of their interest die before they can set to work. Writer Robert Graves died in 1985.
BOOKS
September 27, 1998 | PAUL FUSSELL, Paul Fussell is the author of many books, including "The Great War and Modern Memory." His essay will appear as the introduction to a new edition of "Good-Bye to All That" to be published by Anchor Books
Robert Graves, poet, novelist, critic, essayist, translator and general man of letters, declared in 1955 that World War I "permanently changed my outlook on life." The reasons are all in this brilliant book. England declared war on Germany on Aug. 4, 1914. Eight days later, this enthusiastic, clumsy, 6-foot, 3-inch 19-year-old proudly enlisted for officer training with the regiment of the Royal Welch Fusiliers. Like so many others, his motive was patriotic, but it was also escapist.
MAGAZINE
July 30, 1989
All the latest hoopla over goddesses (Gimbutas, Riane Eisler) and mythology (Joseph Campbell) has produced a deluge of articles. I've yet to see in any of them so much as a mention of the late poet and scholar Robert Graves, whose name used to be synonymous with both. A. REED Los Angeles
BOOKS
December 10, 1989
Although Charles Solomon's short review of Robert Graves' books about Roman emperor Claudius ("I, Claudius"; "Claudius the God," Book Review, Nov. 12) was strangely inapposite, it nevertheless provided some food for thought. Solomon joshed his readers by trotting out the usual critical cliches accusing Graves of basing his book solely on the works of Tacitus and Suetonius. Graves, some years ago, however, cited more than a dozen sources in addition to these two primers as having been used in his research.
BOOKS
September 29, 1991
As one dedicated to poetry composition, and recently inducted into the International Society of Poets at their convention and symposium, I found a faulty assumption in the Book Review section most repugnant and misleading ("Anne Sexton: A Biography," Aug. 25). Reviewer Nancy Mairs noted "the roster of modern poets dead by their own hands--among them Delmore Schwartz, Sylvia Plath, Theodore Roethke, John Berryman--who communicated to the following generation the belief that, in writing poetry, they courted death."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz and Rong-Gong Lin II
The magnitude 4.4 earthquake that struck near Westwood is the most significant shake in Southern California since a 5.5 earthquake hit Chino Hills in 2008, a U.S. Geological Survey seismologist told reporters at a news conference Monday morning. Robert Graves said there have been at least six aftershocks since the 6:25 a.m. earthquake. The largest so far has been a magnitude 2.7 earthquake that struck five miles northwest of Westwood. Graves said there is always the small possibility that the 4.4 earthquake was only a prelude to an equal or stronger shake.
BOOKS
September 27, 1998 | PAUL FUSSELL, Paul Fussell is the author of many books, including "The Great War and Modern Memory." His essay will appear as the introduction to a new edition of "Good-Bye to All That" to be published by Anchor Books
Robert Graves, poet, novelist, critic, essayist, translator and general man of letters, declared in 1955 that World War I "permanently changed my outlook on life." The reasons are all in this brilliant book. England declared war on Germany on Aug. 4, 1914. Eight days later, this enthusiastic, clumsy, 6-foot, 3-inch 19-year-old proudly enlisted for officer training with the regiment of the Royal Welch Fusiliers. Like so many others, his motive was patriotic, but it was also escapist.
BOOKS
January 7, 1996 | Amy Gerstler, Amy Gerstler's most recent book of poems is called "Nerve Storm" (Viking Penguin)
Since the age of 15, poetry has been my ruling passion and I have never intentionally undertaken any task or formed any relationship that seemed inconsistent with poetic principles, which has sometimes won me the reputation of an eccentric. --Robert Graves **** Biographers are often compelled to act like vultures, waiting till the objects of their interest die before they can set to work. Writer Robert Graves died in 1985.
BOOKS
September 29, 1991
As one dedicated to poetry composition, and recently inducted into the International Society of Poets at their convention and symposium, I found a faulty assumption in the Book Review section most repugnant and misleading ("Anne Sexton: A Biography," Aug. 25). Reviewer Nancy Mairs noted "the roster of modern poets dead by their own hands--among them Delmore Schwartz, Sylvia Plath, Theodore Roethke, John Berryman--who communicated to the following generation the belief that, in writing poetry, they courted death."
BOOKS
December 10, 1989
Although Charles Solomon's short review of Robert Graves' books about Roman emperor Claudius ("I, Claudius"; "Claudius the God," Book Review, Nov. 12) was strangely inapposite, it nevertheless provided some food for thought. Solomon joshed his readers by trotting out the usual critical cliches accusing Graves of basing his book solely on the works of Tacitus and Suetonius. Graves, some years ago, however, cited more than a dozen sources in addition to these two primers as having been used in his research.
BOOKS
November 12, 1989 | CHARLES SOLOMON
The popular BBC dramatization starring Derek Jacobi has renewed interest in Robert Graves' historical novels. Although entertaining and generally well-researched, Graves' depiction of Roman history is not universally accepted by historians and should be taken with a grain of salt. His characterizations of the various members of the Imperial Family, including the scurrilous portrait of Tiberius, are taken from "The 12 Caesars" of Suetonius, who had a number of political axes to grind.
MAGAZINE
July 30, 1989
All the latest hoopla over goddesses (Gimbutas, Riane Eisler) and mythology (Joseph Campbell) has produced a deluge of articles. I've yet to see in any of them so much as a mention of the late poet and scholar Robert Graves, whose name used to be synonymous with both. A. REED Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
It's been more than 31/2 politically and culturally eventful decades since the BBC debuted "I, Claudius," the now iconic political drama set in ancient Rome that shocked and amazed audiences, first in the United Kingdom and then the United States. The recent release of an anniversary-edition DVD reminded many that no matter how many naked breasts, bloody beheadings or incestuous liaisons"Game of Thrones" or"The Borgias" serve up, no matter how much spiritual and political rot is examined by"Breaking Bad" or "Homeland," there is no topping the vicious intrigues, vindictive violence and general depravity of Rome as depicted first by novelist and historian Robert Graves and then by screenwriter Jack Pullman and director Herbert Wise.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2012 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Along with millions of idealistic young men who were cut to pieces by machine guns and obliterated by artillery shells, there was another major casualty of World War I: traditional ideas about Western art. The Great War of 1914-18 tilted culture on its axis, particularly in Europe and the United States. Nearly 100 years later, that legacy is being wrestled with in film, visual art, music, television shows like the gauzily nostalgic PBS soaper "Downton Abbey" and plays including the Tony Award-winning"War Horse," concluding its run at the Ahmanson Theatre.
NEWS
December 8, 1985 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Robert Graves, whose voluminous output of poems, books and essays made him an icon among the literati but who was better known to the public as the author of two eminently successful volumes about the Roman emperor Claudius, died Saturday at the age of 90. The perspicacious biographer and translator died in his villa, surrounded by citrus orchards, on Spain's Mediterranean island of Majorca, where he had spent most of his life save for a few brief periods away in his native Britain.
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