Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRobert Graziano
IN THE NEWS

Robert Graziano

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 13, 1998 | ROSS NEWHAN and MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Dodgers on Thursday officially unveiled their management team for Year One of the Rupert Murdoch era, naming longtime owner Peter O'Malley as chairman of the board and Executive Vice President Robert Graziano as president and chief executive officer. The announcements were made at a Dodger Stadium news conference shortly after Fox Group, Murdoch's U.S. cable and broadcast television unit, signed a formal agreement to purchase the team from the O'Malley family.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
July 6, 1998 | JASON REID, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dodger President Bob Graziano watched his favorite team play on TV Sunday while relaxing at home. And with everything he has faced recently, he needed some quiet time. Graziano has been at the center of the season-long turmoil in the formerly harmonious Dodger Universe--and a target of fans longing for victories and stability. So Graziano enjoyed spending a few hours focusing only on runs, hits and errors.
Advertisement
SPORTS
June 23, 1998 | CHRIS FOSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bob Sibole has been attending Dodger games since he was 10. He saw his first game in the Coliseum. Carl Erskine pitched against the St. Louis Cardinals. So Sibole knew that the Dodgers' game against the Angels on Monday night was a watershed moment, and that wasn't referring to interleague play. "We're witnessing history tonight," said Sibole, 50, who lives in Banning. "The Los Angeles Dodgers have never fired a manager before."
SPORTS
June 23, 1998 | CHRIS FOSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bob Sibole has been attending Dodger games since he was 10. He saw his first game in the Coliseum. Carl Erskine pitched against the St. Louis Cardinals. So Sibole knew that the Dodgers' game against the Angels on Monday night was a watershed moment, and that wasn't referring to interleague play. "We're witnessing history tonight," said Sibole, 50, who lives in Banning. "The Los Angeles Dodgers have never fired a manager before."
SPORTS
June 23, 1998 | J.A. ADANDE
Tom Lasorda has another example to add to his extensive list of motivational stories. His own. Last year he was tied to the bow of the Dodger ship, nothing more than a figurehead out in front. Now he's at the helm as the captain, interim or no interim in his new general manager title. "Nothing is impossible," Lasorda said Monday, and wouldn't he know.
SPORTS
June 23, 1998 | ROSS NEWHAN
It is a murky business, this question of who has the final say on pivotal issues with the Dodgers, who influences whom? In the aftermath of the Father's Day Massacre, this much seemed clear at least: Former owner Peter O'Malley was consulted by President Bob Graziano and concurred. The team was listless, the time was right, O'Malley said Monday.
SPORTS
June 23, 1998 | BILL PLASCHKE
All the thoughts, all the insults, all the questions, all the stunned observations of the most stunning bloodletting in Dodger history, they all come down to one. Why? Why, when Los Angeles awakened Monday morning, was its favorite sports team was being run by a rookie general manager, a rookie manager and unmitigated chaos?
SPORTS
July 6, 1998 | JASON REID, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dodger President Bob Graziano watched his favorite team play on TV Sunday while relaxing at home. And with everything he has faced recently, he needed some quiet time. Graziano has been at the center of the season-long turmoil in the formerly harmonious Dodger Universe--and a target of fans longing for victories and stability. So Graziano enjoyed spending a few hours focusing only on runs, hits and errors.
SPORTS
June 22, 1998 | JASON REID, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In yet the most significant change in the reshaping of the Dodgers, Executive Vice President Fred Claire and Manager Bill Russell were fired late Sunday night when the team failed to meet expectations accompanying a $57-million payroll. Claire was succeeded by former manager Tom Lasorda and Glenn Hoffman, who managed the team's triple-A Albuquerque farm club, replaced Russell in the latest stunning move in the franchise's stormy season, its first under the Fox Group.
SPORTS
June 23, 1998 | JASON REID, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was yet another news conference Monday afternoon at Dodger Stadium to spin the latest dramatic move in the organization's season-long sideshow. It was the biggest and most intriguing to date under the Fox Group umbrella, but there's always tomorrow with this suddenly volatile bunch.
SPORTS
June 23, 1998 | J.A. ADANDE
Tom Lasorda has another example to add to his extensive list of motivational stories. His own. Last year he was tied to the bow of the Dodger ship, nothing more than a figurehead out in front. Now he's at the helm as the captain, interim or no interim in his new general manager title. "Nothing is impossible," Lasorda said Monday, and wouldn't he know.
SPORTS
June 23, 1998 | ROSS NEWHAN
It is a murky business, this question of who has the final say on pivotal issues with the Dodgers, who influences whom? In the aftermath of the Father's Day Massacre, this much seemed clear at least: Former owner Peter O'Malley was consulted by President Bob Graziano and concurred. The team was listless, the time was right, O'Malley said Monday.
SPORTS
June 23, 1998 | BILL PLASCHKE
All the thoughts, all the insults, all the questions, all the stunned observations of the most stunning bloodletting in Dodger history, they all come down to one. Why? Why, when Los Angeles awakened Monday morning, was its favorite sports team was being run by a rookie general manager, a rookie manager and unmitigated chaos?
SPORTS
June 23, 1998 | JASON REID, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was yet another news conference Monday afternoon at Dodger Stadium to spin the latest dramatic move in the organization's season-long sideshow. It was the biggest and most intriguing to date under the Fox Group umbrella, but there's always tomorrow with this suddenly volatile bunch.
SPORTS
June 23, 1998 | JASON REID, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dodger players awoke Monday to learn that executive vice president Fred Claire and manager Bill Russell had been fired Sunday night. A season ago, such news would have stirred concern. But in the first year of the Fox Group's rule, the Dodgers approach every morning cautiously. "These days, you don't know what to expect when you wake up," second baseman Eric Young said Monday before the Dodgers' 6-5 loss to the Angels. "It's been one thing after another all season.
SPORTS
June 23, 1998 | JASON REID, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was yet another news conference Monday afternoon at Dodger Stadium to spin the latest dramatic move in the organization's season-long sideshow. It was the biggest and most intriguing to date under the Fox Group umbrella, but there's always tomorrow with this volatile bunch. New Dodger President Bob Graziano initiated the gathering by firing executive vice president Fred Claire and manager Bill Russell late Sunday night and replacing them with Tom Lasorda and Glenn Hoffman, respectively.
SPORTS
June 23, 1998 | JASON REID, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dodger players awoke Monday to learn that executive vice president Fred Claire and manager Bill Russell had been fired Sunday night. A season ago, such news would have stirred concern. But in the first year of the Fox Group's rule, the Dodgers approach every morning cautiously. "These days, you don't know what to expect when you wake up," second baseman Eric Young said Monday before the Dodgers' 6-5 loss to the Angels. "It's been one thing after another all season.
SPORTS
June 23, 1998 | JASON REID, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was yet another news conference Monday afternoon at Dodger Stadium to spin the latest dramatic move in the organization's season-long sideshow. It was the biggest and most intriguing to date under the Fox Group umbrella, but there's always tomorrow with this volatile bunch. New Dodger President Bob Graziano initiated the gathering by firing executive vice president Fred Claire and manager Bill Russell late Sunday night and replacing them with Tom Lasorda and Glenn Hoffman, respectively.
SPORTS
June 23, 1998
WINNER: Tom Lasorda spent two years with nose pressed against Dodger glass. Now he runs the joint. LOSER: Fred Claire spent years running from Lasorda's aura, but ultimately, he could not hide. * WINNER: And to think, two days ago, Glenn Hoffman was just another losing Albuquerque manager. LOSER: Bill Russell knows about replacing a legend . . . when legend doesn't want to be replaced. * WINNER: Bobby Valentine now has more bargaining power than any N.Y. manager since Casey Stengell.
SPORTS
June 22, 1998 | JASON REID, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In yet the most significant change in the reshaping of the Dodgers, Executive Vice President Fred Claire and Manager Bill Russell were fired late Sunday night when the team failed to meet expectations accompanying a $57-million payroll. Claire was succeeded by former manager Tom Lasorda and Glenn Hoffman, who managed the team's triple-A Albuquerque farm club, replaced Russell in the latest stunning move in the franchise's stormy season, its first under the Fox Group.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|