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Robert Greene

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OPINION
September 2, 2011 | By Robert Greene
On or about Sept. 3, 1592, Robert Greene died from eating too many pickled herrings and drinking too much Rhine wine, or Rhenish, as the English called it in those days. I learned this from a poetry anthology — a gift from my mother — containing some of Greene's poems along with a brief biography that relates how he spent his final days in agony, finishing his best-known work on his deathbed. The poet's final offering, "Greene's Groatsworth of Wit, Bought With a Million of Repentance," is less known for any repentance than it is for Greene's envious attack on a nobody, a non-university-trained actor who was getting some notice on the London theater scene.
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BUSINESS
December 23, 2012 | By Lucy Kellaway
We're all geniuses now. At least, we all could be geniuses if only we buckled down and spent an awfully long time working at it. That, roughly, is the thesis of "Mastery," the latest door stopper from Los Angeles author Robert Greene, whose books include "The 48 Laws of Power" and "The 50th Law," a management book co-authored with rapper 50 Cent. Readers may spot that his new thesis is the same as that put forward in Malcolm Gladwell's "Outliers," only Greene has improved it in three ways.
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BUSINESS
August 30, 2011 | By Andrea Chang, Los Angeles Times
When author Robert Greene wrote his bestselling book "The 48 Laws of Power," his win-at-all-costs message turned him into a cult hero with the hip-hop set, Hollywood elite and prison inmates alike. Crush your enemy totally, he wrote in Law 15. Play a sucker to catch a sucker, he said in another. Get others to do the work for you, but always take the credit. Greene's warrior-like take on the quest for power, written more than a decade ago, would eventually attract another devotee: Dov Charney, the provocative and sometimes impish chief executive of Los Angeles clothing company American Apparel Inc. The 52-year-old Greene — a former screenwriter who speaks five languages and worked 80 jobs before writing "The 48 Laws" — has become Charney's guru, a trusted confidant to the 42-year-old entrepreneur and, insiders say, a voice of reason on American Apparel's board of directors.
OPINION
September 2, 2011 | By Robert Greene
On or about Sept. 3, 1592, Robert Greene died from eating too many pickled herrings and drinking too much Rhine wine, or Rhenish, as the English called it in those days. I learned this from a poetry anthology — a gift from my mother — containing some of Greene's poems along with a brief biography that relates how he spent his final days in agony, finishing his best-known work on his deathbed. The poet's final offering, "Greene's Groatsworth of Wit, Bought With a Million of Repentance," is less known for any repentance than it is for Greene's envious attack on a nobody, a non-university-trained actor who was getting some notice on the London theater scene.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Robert W. Greene, 78, an investigative journalist who led reporters from across the country in an effort to uncover corruption in Arizona and who twice helped Newsday win the Pulitzer Prize for public service, died Thursday in a Smithtown, N.Y., hospital of problems including congestive heart failure, the Long Island newspaper reported. Greene, who spent 37 years as a reporter and editor at Newsday before retiring in 1993, had been ill for some time. He won his first Pulitzer in 1970 for exposing land scandals in a Long Island town.
NEWS
July 24, 1997
Robert Lamont Green, 79, fashion editor of Playboy in the 1960s and '70s, author and CBS network programmer. "I was a teacher of psychology and never intended to become involved in fashion," he once said. Green also was an Army colonel. In a 1970 interview, discussing changes in men in modern society, he said, "The most inhibited man in the world, in the privacy of his bathroom, has looked at himself in the mirror during a moment of narcissistic admiration and said, 'Sic 'em, tiger.'
SPORTS
June 12, 2010 | By Kevin Baxter
Reporting from Rustenburg, South Africa -- It was one of the best moments of Clint Dempsey's career. And one of the worst of Robert Green's life It made one a hero, the other a goat. Yet it all started rather normally with the ball leaving Dempsey's left foot, softly skipping off the grass as it headed toward Green's safe embrace. Even Dempsey turned away, knowing England's goalkeeper would make the easy save. Then both players' lives changed in an instant. Rather than rolling into Green's arms, the ball bounced off his hands and wobbled behind him, barely crossing the goal line but far enough to give the U.S. an improbable 1-1 tie with England in the World Cup opener for both teams Saturday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2010 | By Ann M. Simmons
Los Angeles Times editorial writer Robert Greene has been awarded this year's Walker Stone Award for "outstanding achievement in editorial writing," the Scripps Howard Foundation announced Friday. The award is one of several accolades presented by the foundation each year to honor "the best work in the communications industry and journalism education." Greene received the award for editorials he wrote in 2009. "I was very excited and I felt honored and humbled," Greene said after learning of the honor.
BUSINESS
December 23, 2012 | By Lucy Kellaway
We're all geniuses now. At least, we all could be geniuses if only we buckled down and spent an awfully long time working at it. That, roughly, is the thesis of "Mastery," the latest door stopper from Los Angeles author Robert Greene, whose books include "The 48 Laws of Power" and "The 50th Law," a management book co-authored with rapper 50 Cent. Readers may spot that his new thesis is the same as that put forward in Malcolm Gladwell's "Outliers," only Greene has improved it in three ways.
SPORTS
June 12, 2010 | By Grahame L. Jones
Reporting from Rustenburg, South Africa -- The bad news for Tim Howard arrived four minutes into Saturday's World Cup match between the U.S. and England at the Royal Bafokeng Stadium. That's when the American defense sprang a leak and England's Steven Gerrard slotted the ball past Howard in the U.S. goal. The bad news for Robert Green arrived five minutes before halftime. That's when Clint Dempsey double-faked Gerrard and hit a shot that Green somehow contrived to fumble into his own net. As far as goals go, that was it. The match ended in a 1-1 tie, which was a huge plus for the underdog U.S. and a huge blow to the ego of World Cup contender England and its fans.
BUSINESS
August 30, 2011 | By Andrea Chang, Los Angeles Times
When author Robert Greene wrote his bestselling book "The 48 Laws of Power," his win-at-all-costs message turned him into a cult hero with the hip-hop set, Hollywood elite and prison inmates alike. Crush your enemy totally, he wrote in Law 15. Play a sucker to catch a sucker, he said in another. Get others to do the work for you, but always take the credit. Greene's warrior-like take on the quest for power, written more than a decade ago, would eventually attract another devotee: Dov Charney, the provocative and sometimes impish chief executive of Los Angeles clothing company American Apparel Inc. The 52-year-old Greene — a former screenwriter who speaks five languages and worked 80 jobs before writing "The 48 Laws" — has become Charney's guru, a trusted confidant to the 42-year-old entrepreneur and, insiders say, a voice of reason on American Apparel's board of directors.
SPORTS
June 12, 2010 | By Grahame L. Jones
Reporting from Rustenburg, South Africa -- The bad news for Tim Howard arrived four minutes into Saturday's World Cup match between the U.S. and England at the Royal Bafokeng Stadium. That's when the American defense sprang a leak and England's Steven Gerrard slotted the ball past Howard in the U.S. goal. The bad news for Robert Green arrived five minutes before halftime. That's when Clint Dempsey double-faked Gerrard and hit a shot that Green somehow contrived to fumble into his own net. As far as goals go, that was it. The match ended in a 1-1 tie, which was a huge plus for the underdog U.S. and a huge blow to the ego of World Cup contender England and its fans.
SPORTS
June 12, 2010 | By Kevin Baxter
Reporting from Rustenburg, South Africa -- It was one of the best moments of Clint Dempsey's career. And one of the worst of Robert Green's life It made one a hero, the other a goat. Yet it all started rather normally with the ball leaving Dempsey's left foot, softly skipping off the grass as it headed toward Green's safe embrace. Even Dempsey turned away, knowing England's goalkeeper would make the easy save. Then both players' lives changed in an instant. Rather than rolling into Green's arms, the ball bounced off his hands and wobbled behind him, barely crossing the goal line but far enough to give the U.S. an improbable 1-1 tie with England in the World Cup opener for both teams Saturday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2010 | By Ann M. Simmons
Los Angeles Times editorial writer Robert Greene has been awarded this year's Walker Stone Award for "outstanding achievement in editorial writing," the Scripps Howard Foundation announced Friday. The award is one of several accolades presented by the foundation each year to honor "the best work in the communications industry and journalism education." Greene received the award for editorials he wrote in 2009. "I was very excited and I felt honored and humbled," Greene said after learning of the honor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Robert W. Greene, 78, an investigative journalist who led reporters from across the country in an effort to uncover corruption in Arizona and who twice helped Newsday win the Pulitzer Prize for public service, died Thursday in a Smithtown, N.Y., hospital of problems including congestive heart failure, the Long Island newspaper reported. Greene, who spent 37 years as a reporter and editor at Newsday before retiring in 1993, had been ill for some time. He won his first Pulitzer in 1970 for exposing land scandals in a Long Island town.
NEWS
July 24, 1997
Robert Lamont Green, 79, fashion editor of Playboy in the 1960s and '70s, author and CBS network programmer. "I was a teacher of psychology and never intended to become involved in fashion," he once said. Green also was an Army colonel. In a 1970 interview, discussing changes in men in modern society, he said, "The most inhibited man in the world, in the privacy of his bathroom, has looked at himself in the mirror during a moment of narcissistic admiration and said, 'Sic 'em, tiger.'
BUSINESS
December 10, 1987
First Interstate Bancorp has named Robert E. Greene executive vice president and senior credit officer.
NEWS
September 23, 2004 | David C. Nichols
The Winter's Tale: Ellen Geer's revival of William Shakespeare's 1611 tragicomedy is fluid and uncluttered. Shakespeare culled his narrative from Robert Greene's 1588 "Pandosto," in which a king's unfounded jealousy results in the death of his queen and son, the banishment of his daughter, near incest and suicide.
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