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Robert Grenier

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February 7, 2006 | Greg Miller, Times Staff Writer
The head of the CIA's counter-terrorism center was forced to step down Monday over concerns that he was not aggressive enough in leading the agency's pursuit of Al Qaeda and other terrorist organizations, current and former intelligence officials said. The sudden departure of Robert Grenier, who had held the position for about a year, was described by intelligence officials as part of an effort to reinvigorate counter-terrorism operations that have had mixed results during his tenure.
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NATIONAL
February 7, 2006 | Greg Miller, Times Staff Writer
The head of the CIA's counter-terrorism center was forced to step down Monday over concerns that he was not aggressive enough in leading the agency's pursuit of Al Qaeda and other terrorist organizations, current and former intelligence officials said. The sudden departure of Robert Grenier, who had held the position for about a year, was described by intelligence officials as part of an effort to reinvigorate counter-terrorism operations that have had mixed results during his tenure.
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TRAVEL
April 16, 1989
Robert Grenier's letter, "Good Russian Food" (April 2), claimed that after five trips to the Soviet Union he found the food to be satisfactory. In the second paragraph of the letter it stated that the foods of Uzbekistan, Armenia, Ukraine and other republics also were featured and sampled to satisfaction. Therefore, the line above the letter should not have called the food "Russian," because they are not. Ukrainian food is very different from Russian and I am certain that Ukrainians would not appreciate having their unique foods labeled "Russian."
WORLD
November 15, 2009 | Greg Miller
The CIA has funneled hundreds of millions of dollars to Pakistan's intelligence service since the Sept. 11 attacks, accounting for as much as one-third of the foreign spy agency's annual budget, current and former U.S. officials say. The Inter-Services Intelligence agency also has collected tens of millions of dollars through a classified CIA program that pays for the capture or killing of wanted militants, a clandestine counterpart to the rewards...
NATIONAL
September 24, 2006 | Greg Miller, Times Staff Writer
For an agency that ordinarily steers clear of major policy debates, the CIA played an unusually prominent role in the showdown between the White House and dissident Republicans over the treatment of detainees. To many outsiders, the CIA's position was puzzling. Why would an agency whose own overseas officers are vulnerable to capture -- and torture -- defend harsh interrogation methods?
WORLD
January 18, 2008 | Josh Meyer, Times Staff Writer
The CIA believes that Pakistani Taliban commander Baitullah Mahsud and his associates, some linked to Al Qaeda, were responsible for the assassination last month of former Pakistani Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto, a U.S. intelligence official said Thursday. "There are strong indications that Baitullah Mahsud was behind the Bhutto assassination," said the official, who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss the matter publicly.
NATIONAL
February 6, 2007 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby told a federal grand jury three years ago that he did not believe he had discussed the wife of an administration critic with officials from the CIA and the State Department, contradicting sworn testimony by the officials at Libby's perjury trial here. The revelation came Monday as prosecutors began playing audiotapes of Libby's eight hours of testimony before a grand jury investigating how the identity of CIA officer Valerie Plame became public.
NATIONAL
January 25, 2007 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby's defense against perjury charges, which rests in part on what he has described as innocent memory lapses, appeared to gain some ground Wednesday when his lawyers showed that two government witnesses in the case had memory issues of their own.
NATIONAL
September 7, 2006 | Josh Meyer and Greg Miller, Times Staff Writers
The United States has transferred 14 suspected top leaders of Al Qaeda from secret CIA prisons overseas to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to face justice before a proposed military commission, President Bush disclosed Wednesday. Among those being held in the prison at the U.S. naval base in Cuba are the self-proclaimed mastermind of the Sept. 11 attacks on New York and Washington five years ago, Khalid Shaikh Mohammed, and two of his alleged lieutenants.
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