Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRobert H Brom
IN THE NEWS

Robert H Brom

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 11, 1990 | RICHARD A. OPPEL JR. and LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Pope John Paul II on Tuesday accepted the resignation of ailing Bishop Leo T. Maher, who gained nationwide attention when he refused Communion to a political candidate because of her views on abortion, as head of the Catholic Diocese of San Diego. As expected, Bishop Robert H. Brom became the fourth leader of the diocese. It was also announced Tuesday that the Pope has accepted the resignation of the nation's highest-ranking black Roman Catholic clergyman, Archbishop Eugene A.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2007 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
The Catholic bishop of San Diego is set to testify today in the diocese's bankruptcy case in federal court. It is the kind of public appearance that Bishop Robert H. Brom largely has avoided in his 18 years here. The spiritual leader of a million Catholics in San Diego and Imperial counties has steadfastly kept a low profile, rarely speaking publicly outside of church and even more rarely answering questions.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1990 | RICHARD A. OPPEL JR., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bishop Robert H. Brom became the fourth bishop of the Catholic Diocese of San Diego Tuesday after the Pope accepted his predecessor's resignation letter earlier in the day in Rome. Brom, 51, appointed successor to the job in April 1989, replaces the ailing Bishop Leo T. Maher, 75. Maher, who is suffering from a malignant brain tumor, reached the church's mandatory retirement age July 1 and had been waiting for the Pope to accept his resignation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2007 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
Advocates for people who say they were sexually abused by Catholic priests here urged Bishop Robert Brom on Wednesday to try to settle their lawsuits rather than proceed with the diocese's bankruptcy case. "He should make one in-person stab at settling this," David Clohessy, national director of the Survivors Network of Those Abused by Priests, or SNAP, said at a news conference outside St. Joseph's Cathedral. "If he doesn't, his sincerity is questionable."
NEWS
May 10, 1989 | BARRY M. HORSTMAN, Times Staff Writer
Bishop Robert H. Brom of Minnesota, a theological moderate who says he believes that the Catholic Church's "objective truths" must be weighed against individuals' "subjective circumstances," on Tuesday was named coadjutor bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of San Diego and the future successor to Bishop Leo T. Maher. In a decision announced in Washington by Archbishop Pio Laghi, the apostolic delegateto the United States, Pope John Paul II appointed Brom to be coadjutor--an heir apparent who will share diocesan duties with Maher until he reaches the church's mandatory retirement age of 75 in July, 1990.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2007 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
The Catholic bishop of San Diego is set to testify today in the diocese's bankruptcy case in federal court. It is the kind of public appearance that Bishop Robert H. Brom largely has avoided in his 18 years here. The spiritual leader of a million Catholics in San Diego and Imperial counties has steadfastly kept a low profile, rarely speaking publicly outside of church and even more rarely answering questions.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1991 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here is Robert H. Brom, bishop of the Catholic Diocese of San Diego: To a classroom of first-, second- and third-graders at the St. Therese Academy in Del Cerro, he's explaining the significance of his formal wardrobe. "Sometimes I feel like a great big billboard," he says, adorned in the fancy black-and-red garments that reflect his clerical ranking. "When I was made bishop, I went to the bishop's store to get the things I would need.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2007 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
Advocates for people who say they were sexually abused by Catholic priests here urged Bishop Robert Brom on Wednesday to try to settle their lawsuits rather than proceed with the diocese's bankruptcy case. "He should make one in-person stab at settling this," David Clohessy, national director of the Survivors Network of Those Abused by Priests, or SNAP, said at a news conference outside St. Joseph's Cathedral. "If he doesn't, his sincerity is questionable."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 1990 | From staff and wire reports
San Diego Bishop Robert H. Brom has been selected by Pope John Paul II to serve on the 1990 Synod of Bishops, the San Diego Diocese has announced.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1991
The June 30 article, which draws a portrait of Bishop Robert H. Brom of the Catholic Diocese of San Diego ("Portrait of a Bishop"), is an appropriately upbeat and laudatory one. Since Bishop Brom arrived in San Diego, he has won the affection and support of many in the community, including the leaders of the Jewish community. The article, however, does not do what I would consider appropriate justice to the efforts of the late Bishop Leo Maher to bring about reconciliation between the Jewish and Catholic communities.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1991 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here is Robert H. Brom, bishop of the Catholic Diocese of San Diego: To a classroom of first-, second- and third-graders at the St. Therese Academy in Del Cerro, he's explaining the significance of his formal wardrobe. "Sometimes I feel like a great big billboard," he says, adorned in the fancy black-and-red garments that reflect his clerical ranking. "When I was made bishop, I went to the bishop's store to get the things I would need.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1990 | RICHARD A. OPPEL JR., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bishop Robert H. Brom became the fourth bishop of the Catholic Diocese of San Diego Tuesday after the Pope accepted his predecessor's resignation letter earlier in the day in Rome. Brom, 51, appointed successor to the job in April 1989, replaces the ailing Bishop Leo T. Maher, 75. Maher, who is suffering from a malignant brain tumor, reached the church's mandatory retirement age July 1 and had been waiting for the Pope to accept his resignation.
NEWS
July 11, 1990 | RICHARD A. OPPEL JR. and LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Pope John Paul II on Tuesday accepted the resignation of ailing Bishop Leo T. Maher, who gained nationwide attention when he refused Communion to a political candidate because of her views on abortion, as head of the Catholic Diocese of San Diego. As expected, Bishop Robert H. Brom became the fourth leader of the diocese. It was also announced Tuesday that the Pope has accepted the resignation of the nation's highest-ranking black Roman Catholic clergyman, Archbishop Eugene A.
NEWS
May 10, 1989 | BARRY M. HORSTMAN, Times Staff Writer
Bishop Robert H. Brom of Minnesota, a theological moderate who says he believes that the Catholic Church's "objective truths" must be weighed against individuals' "subjective circumstances," on Tuesday was named coadjutor bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of San Diego and the future successor to Bishop Leo T. Maher. In a decision announced in Washington by Archbishop Pio Laghi, the apostolic delegateto the United States, Pope John Paul II appointed Brom to be coadjutor--an heir apparent who will share diocesan duties with Maher until he reaches the church's mandatory retirement age of 75 in July, 1990.
NEWS
July 10, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Archbishop Eugene A. Marino, the nation's first black archbishop and its highest-ranking black Roman Catholic, resigned his position today, citing health reasons. Marino, who underwent treatment for alcoholism 12 years ago, said in a statement that he needs "an extended period of spiritual renewal, psychological therapy and medical supervision." He added that "the church of Atlanta needs a shepherd . . . who is healthy."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2007 | John Spano, Times Staff Writer
A judge Wednesday ordered Cardinal Roger M. Mahony to testify in a lawsuit alleging that he failed to protect parishioners from a pedophile teacher, but then granted the Los Angeles cleric's request for a trial delay. The lawsuit had been scheduled for trial Monday; Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Haley Fromholtz agreed to a two-month delay. Mary Grant, Western regional director of the Survivors Network of Those Abused by Priests, called the delay "a shame on the church."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|