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Robert H Gustafson

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2004 | From a Times Staff Writer
A 25-year veteran of the Orange Police Department was sworn in Monday as the chief of the 158-officer department. Robert H. Gustafson is the city's 33rd police chief. Gustafson, 49, joined the Orange department in 1979. He worked his way to captain of the patrol division by 1998. He has earned degrees from Cal State Pomona and Cal State Northridge. "It just seems like a natural step for me, and I'm very excited about the opportunity for the Police Department and the city," Gustafson said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2004 | From a Times Staff Writer
A 25-year veteran of the Orange Police Department was sworn in Monday as the chief of the 158-officer department. Robert H. Gustafson is the city's 33rd police chief. Gustafson, 49, joined the Orange department in 1979. He worked his way to captain of the patrol division by 1998. He has earned degrees from Cal State Pomona and Cal State Northridge. "It just seems like a natural step for me, and I'm very excited about the opportunity for the Police Department and the city," Gustafson said.
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NEWS
October 15, 1988 | GLENN F. BUNTING and DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, Times Staff Writers
Federal authorities are investigating the State Board of Equalization's pattern of awarding huge tax breaks to corporations that make thousands of dollars in political contributions to the board's members, The Times has learned. The U.S. attorney's office in Sacramento began looking into the board's activities in May, a Justice Department source said. On Friday, FBI agents spent two hours talking to Robert H.
NEWS
October 15, 1988 | GLENN F. BUNTING and DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, Times Staff Writers
Federal authorities are investigating the State Board of Equalization's pattern of awarding huge tax breaks to corporations that make thousands of dollars in political contributions to the board's members, The Times has learned. The U.S. attorney's office in Sacramento began looking into the board's activities in May, a Justice Department source said. On Friday, FBI agents spent two hours talking to Robert H.
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