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Robert H Hood

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BUSINESS
January 28, 1989 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
Douglas Aircraft President James E. Worsham, the hard-driving airplane salesman who is widely credited with the historic turnaround of McDonnell Douglas' commercial aircraft business in the 1980s, will step down May 1. McDonnell Douglas named Robert H. Hood Jr. to succeed Worsham, who will turn 65 in April and leave under the company's mandatory retirement policy.
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BUSINESS
January 28, 1989 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
Douglas Aircraft President James E. Worsham, the hard-driving airplane salesman who is widely credited with the historic turnaround of McDonnell Douglas' commercial aircraft business in the 1980s, will step down May 1. McDonnell Douglas named Robert H. Hood Jr. to succeed Worsham, who will turn 65 in April and leave under the company's mandatory retirement policy.
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BUSINESS
January 4, 1990 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN
In a move to modify its vast reorganization in 1989, McDonnell Douglas has named John P. Capellupo deputy president of its Douglas Aircraft unit in Long Beach. Capellupo, a veteran of McDonnell's operations in St. Louis for more than 30 years, will begin in the newly created position Monday. Douglas Aircraft underwent a tumultuous reorganization last year, in which all of the 5,200 members of management were forced to apply for new jobs.
BUSINESS
September 25, 1993 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
McDonnell Douglas Corp., anxious to secure part of Saudi Arabia's anticipated multibillion-dollar purchase of passenger jets, is offering to accept crude oil rather than cash for payment on McDonnell planes, a senior company executive said Friday. Robert H. Hood Jr., president of the company's Douglas Aircraft Co. subsidiary, which builds commercial jets in Long Beach, said the barter offer is among several financing alternatives in McDonnell's proposal to the Saudis.
BUSINESS
March 29, 1989 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
Douglas Aircraft has notified its commercial aircraft customers that delivery delays, which have plagued the McDonnell Douglas subsidiary for the past year, are expected to grow somewhat worse during 1989. The firm announced Tuesday that because of a record backlog of orders, problems with rapid employment growth and various management changes, deliveries of some MD-80 jetliners from its Long Beach complex will be delayed about five to 30 days this year. Robert H. Hood Jr.
BUSINESS
November 1, 1988 | DAVID OLMOS, Times Staff Writer
McDonnell Douglas said Monday that it will split up its astronautics company, which includes its 8,200-employee facility in Huntington Beach, into three separate units effective Dec. 1. Company officials said the move is intended to streamline the operations of the St. Louis-based astronautics division and better focus activities of its three primary businesses--space systems, missile systems and defense electronics.
BUSINESS
April 22, 1989 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
McDonnell Douglas posted a $10-million first-quarter loss Friday, the result of a stunning $66-million loss at its Douglas Aircraft operation in Long Beach. Douglas took a $31-million charge on the Navy T-45 trainer aircraft program, a development under a fixed-price contract. The project has encountered problems that the company will have to solve at its own expense. The balance of the losses at Douglas, $35 million, apparently occurred on its commercial aircraft business.
NEWS
February 29, 2000 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Again testing the frontiers in the war on drugs, the Supreme Court agreed Monday to decide whether public hospitals and police can work together to arrest pregnant women who have used cocaine. South Carolina is the only state that charges mothers with child abuse if their babies are born with traces of illegal drugs in their blood. To enforce the policy, nurses and doctors at a public hospital in Charleston, S.C.
NEWS
October 5, 2000 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court took up an unusual drug testing case Wednesday that pits the privacy rights of pregnant women against the government's power to protect unborn children from danger. Amid the "crack baby" crisis of the 1980s, a public hospital in Charleston, S.C., began working with police and prosecutors there to punish women who were using cocaine. Some were arrested and taken to jail just after giving birth.
BUSINESS
February 13, 1993 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the depths of a commercial aerospace bust, senior McDonnell Douglas executives Friday proclaimed the long-term viability of their Douglas Aircraft unit and laid out a detailed strategy to survive the next several years. The firm has trimmed $750 million in annual overhead costs at the Long Beach-based commercial aircraft unit and could remain profitable through 1995 based solely on existing orders for aircraft, they said. The unit has reported profits for the last nine quarters.
NEWS
February 17, 1994 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saudi Arabia's plan to buy about $6 billion worth of jetliners from McDonnell Douglas Corp. and Boeing Co. is likely to save the 11,000 remaining jobs at McDonnell's struggling Douglas Aircraft Co. division in Long Beach--and perhaps prevent Douglas from failing, industry experts said. The Saudi order announced Wednesday will help staunch the erosion of aerospace jobs not only at Douglas but also at dozens of Southern California aircraft-component makers--including Northrop Corp., Rohr Inc.
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