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Robert H Knight

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June 25, 1995
I am the author of the Heritage Foundation report on the National Endowment for the Arts to which Christopher Knight alludes in his June 11 review of Alice Marquis's book, "Art Lessons." As when he attacked the report in a 1991 Times column characterized by name calling and innuendo, he offers no evidence of inaccuracies on my part. On the other hand, he himself displays little regard for the truth when he mischaracterizes my current employer, Family Research Council, as a "fundamentalist Christian organization."
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June 25, 1995
I am the author of the Heritage Foundation report on the National Endowment for the Arts to which Christopher Knight alludes in his June 11 review of Alice Marquis's book, "Art Lessons." As when he attacked the report in a 1991 Times column characterized by name calling and innuendo, he offers no evidence of inaccuracies on my part. On the other hand, he himself displays little regard for the truth when he mischaracterizes my current employer, Family Research Council, as a "fundamentalist Christian organization."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 1991
Christopher Knight's column ("The Heritage Foundation Takes the Fight Over the Arts to Ignorant New Lows," Opinion, Feb. 24) was a parody, right? If Knight reads it aloud, surely he will get a government grant for performance art. It fits the current National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) standard, which, as I understand it, is a "cutting edge" work characterized by rage, name-calling and little substance. Bravo, Mr. Knight. On the other hand, the tone of his attack on my Heritage Foundation report on the NEA is so personal and ferocious there must be more to it. Did I run over Knight's dog or what?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 1991
Christopher Knight's column ("The Heritage Foundation Takes the Fight Over the Arts to Ignorant New Lows," Opinion, Feb. 24) was a parody, right? If Knight reads it aloud, surely he will get a government grant for performance art. It fits the current National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) standard, which, as I understand it, is a "cutting edge" work characterized by rage, name-calling and little substance. Bravo, Mr. Knight. On the other hand, the tone of his attack on my Heritage Foundation report on the NEA is so personal and ferocious there must be more to it. Did I run over Knight's dog or what?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 1991 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The National Endowment for the Arts faced new controversy Tuesday as a conservative Washington think tank released a political broadside directed against the agency, even as several in the arts community continued a protest over a rejected grant. In Washington, the Heritage Foundation called for specific restrictions on the kind of art the federal agency can support and leveled new accusations that the NEA has "censored" traditional art forms.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1991 | CATHY CURTIS
When Robert H. Knight worked on The Times' copy desk, he loved to buttonhole his colleagues and try to teach them the folly of their liberal ways. He is a smart, affable guy, and we enjoyed the opportunity to think on our feet and combat his right-wing volleys. Knight and I had a few conversations about art. He once told me his favorite artist was Norman Rockwell. I thought he was joking.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1991
Golly, here I am in Washington, trying to persuade people that the Los Angeles Times is superior to the local rag (which rhymes with toast and whose Style section specializes in politically correct profiles), when I notice a Calendar Page 1 personal attack on me by art critic Cathy Curtis ("Should the NEA Fund R&D?" Feb. 11). My crime was writing a Heritage Foundation report that criticizes the National Endowment for the Arts. Ms. Curtis begins by calling me "right-wing" (a term for anybody that progressives don't like, from Charlton Heston to anti-Gorbachev Communists)
NEWS
October 21, 1995 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton put himself on record Friday as the nation's first chief executive to support a federal measure that would outlaw job discrimination against gay men and lesbians, an idea that has growing support in Congress but is unlikely to win passage any time soon. Clinton's announcement likely will shore up his political backing among gays and lesbians, who say they were disappointed by the Administration's failure to repeal the military's ban on openly gay personnel.
NEWS
January 21, 1996 | BOB SIPCHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a colorful detour from this political season's bland campaign circuit, the front-running Republican presidential candidate, who has scolded the media for creating "nightmares of depravity," visited the original "Animal House" fraternity, then did a rolling, rock-style interview for the network that gave America Beavis and Butt-head.
OPINION
February 24, 1991 | Christopher Knight, Christopher Knight is an art critic for The Times. and
The politically motivated quarrels over artistic censorship during the past two years may have left the front pages, but they're far from over. At least one prominent Washington think-tank has decided to capitalize on the furor, apparently hoping to formalize the previously ad hoc brawl. The Heritage Foundation, which provided much of the ideological ammunition successfully deployed by the Reagan Administration, has added a "cultural policy studies office" to its operation.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1991 | CATHY CURTIS
When Robert H. Knight worked on The Times' copy desk, he loved to buttonhole his colleagues and try to teach them the folly of their liberal ways. He is a smart, affable guy, and we enjoyed the opportunity to think on our feet and combat his right-wing volleys. Knight and I had a few conversations about art. He once told me his favorite artist was Norman Rockwell. I thought he was joking.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 1991 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The National Endowment for the Arts faced new controversy Tuesday as a conservative Washington think tank released a political broadside directed against the agency, even as several in the arts community continued a protest over a rejected grant. In Washington, the Heritage Foundation called for specific restrictions on the kind of art the federal agency can support and leveled new accusations that the NEA has "censored" traditional art forms.
NEWS
December 4, 1996 | SUSAN ESSOYAN and BETTINA BOXALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hawaii, known for its progressive social streak, became the first state in the nation to legalize marriage between same-sex couples Tuesday when a judge ruled that banning such unions is unjustified discrimination. "We hope to get married in the next couple of days," said an elated Joseph Melillo, who brought suit with his partner, Patrick Lagon, and two lesbian couples. "It's a very strong decision." In his opinion, Hawaii Circuit Judge Kevin S.C.
NATIONAL
December 27, 2004 | Richard T. Cooper and Johanna Neuman, Times Staff Writers
Among the droves of conservative Christian lobbyists arguing their points of view in Washington, one relatively little-known group has a simple formula for setting itself apart from the crowd: Don't give an inch. Concerned Women for America always takes the most uncompromising positions. The group, founded 25 years ago in San Diego, almost never settles for half a loaf. And at the first hint of backsliding, it attacks its conservative comrades with the same fury it unleashes on liberals.
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