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Robert H Michel

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October 16, 1990 | Associated Press
For the second time in nine months, an angry constituent of House Minority Leader Robert H. Michel (R-Ill.) has used the lawmaker's house here as a billboard to express displeasure with federal tax policies and pay raises. "Cut Taxes, Deficit" and "Repeal--Stolen Pay Raise" were sprayed in green paint on the front of the house. A dollar sign was painted on the door. An aide said Michel was angry.
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NEWS
November 26, 1994 | From Associated Press
Republicans marching toward a majority in the House of Representatives got a stern warning from outgoing leader Robert H. Michel: Don't let it go to your heads. Michel, the top Republican in the House since 1981, also said in an interview published Friday in the Chicago Tribune that the "contract with America" Republicans campaigned on could actually worsen the federal budget deficit.
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NEWS
January 2, 1989
House Minority Leader Robert H. Michel (R-Ill.) said higher taxes probably will be part of a bipartisan compromise budget plan in 1989. Michel said he does not believe that spending can be cut enough to meet deficit limits set by law. "I don't know that there is that much flexibility," he said. "I suspect (tax increases) may be part of the answer." Senate Minority Leader Bob Dole (R-Kan.
NEWS
April 25, 1993 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The vote was three days past and the Democrats' battle lost, but President Clinton and a senior Republican kept up the argument Saturday over Clinton's defeated economic stimulus program--with the President accusing the Senate's GOP minority of playing "parliamentary games with our people's lives." House Minority Leader Robert H. Michel (R-Ill.
NEWS
April 25, 1993 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The vote was three days past and the Democrats' battle lost, but President Clinton and a senior Republican kept up the argument Saturday over Clinton's defeated economic stimulus program--with the President accusing the Senate's GOP minority of playing "parliamentary games with our people's lives." House Minority Leader Robert H. Michel (R-Ill.
NEWS
March 16, 1988 | Associated Press
Former Chicago Mayor Jane M. Byrne's bid for a political comeback ended in defeat in Illinois' primary election Tuesday, but House Minority Leader Robert H. Michel, President Reagan's point man in Congress, easily overcame his first GOP challenge in 32 years. Michel's victory could set the stage for a November rematch of the 1982 contest that almost cost him his 18th District seat. Partial returns gave Michel 89% of the vote over Tazewell County Board Chairman James E. Unsicker.
NEWS
November 24, 1990 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Democratic congressional leaders expressed strong reservations Friday about President Bush's discussion of the Persian Gulf crisis with Syrian President Hafez Assad, whose nation remains on the State Department's list of countries that support terrorism. While Republicans guardedly defended the President's meeting with Assad in Geneva, Democratic leaders of the House and Senate urged Bush to avoid forming a new alliance with Syria just because it opposes Iraq.
NEWS
November 26, 1994 | From Associated Press
Republicans marching toward a majority in the House of Representatives got a stern warning from outgoing leader Robert H. Michel: Don't let it go to your heads. Michel, the top Republican in the House since 1981, also said in an interview published Friday in the Chicago Tribune that the "contract with America" Republicans campaigned on could actually worsen the federal budget deficit.
NEWS
March 23, 1989 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
Frustrated by decades of Democratic domination, House Republicans Wednesday elected confrontational conservative Rep. Newt Gingrich of Georgia to their second-ranking leadership post over the opposition of House Republican leader Robert H. Michel of Illinois. Backers of Gingrich said that his 87-85 victory over the more traditional and less colorful Rep. Edward R. Madigan (R-Ill.) reflected a widespread demand for more aggressive tactics in dealing with the Democratic majority.
NEWS
June 7, 1989 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
In an unprecedented change of command, House Majority Leader Thomas S. Foley (D-Wash.) became House Speaker in mid-term of the congressional session Tuesday and immediately appealed for an end to recriminations stemming from predecessor Jim Wright's dramatic resignation from the post. Foley, picking up the gavel that symbolizes the enormous power of the presiding officer of the House, made his plea for a truce in political warfare even before taking the oath of office in the chamber.
NEWS
February 18, 1993 | From Associated Press
Here is the text of the response of House Minority Leader Robert H. Michel (R-Ill.) to President Clinton's address Wednesday night to Congress: Good evening. Tonight you and I witnessed a colorful ritual: a new President of the United States addressing a joint session of Congress for the first time. The great chamber of the House rang out with cheers for the President. It was, as always, a thrilling spectacle. But now the last echo of the final cheer has faded away. The ceremony is over.
NEWS
November 24, 1990 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Democratic congressional leaders expressed strong reservations Friday about President Bush's discussion of the Persian Gulf crisis with Syrian President Hafez Assad, whose nation remains on the State Department's list of countries that support terrorism. While Republicans guardedly defended the President's meeting with Assad in Geneva, Democratic leaders of the House and Senate urged Bush to avoid forming a new alliance with Syria just because it opposes Iraq.
NEWS
October 16, 1990 | Associated Press
For the second time in nine months, an angry constituent of House Minority Leader Robert H. Michel (R-Ill.) has used the lawmaker's house here as a billboard to express displeasure with federal tax policies and pay raises. "Cut Taxes, Deficit" and "Repeal--Stolen Pay Raise" were sprayed in green paint on the front of the house. A dollar sign was painted on the door. An aide said Michel was angry.
NEWS
June 7, 1989 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
In an unprecedented change of command, House Majority Leader Thomas S. Foley (D-Wash.) became House Speaker in mid-term of the congressional session Tuesday and immediately appealed for an end to recriminations stemming from predecessor Jim Wright's dramatic resignation from the post. Foley, picking up the gavel that symbolizes the enormous power of the presiding officer of the House, made his plea for a truce in political warfare even before taking the oath of office in the chamber.
NEWS
March 23, 1989 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
Frustrated by decades of Democratic domination, House Republicans Wednesday elected confrontational conservative Rep. Newt Gingrich of Georgia to their second-ranking leadership post over the opposition of House Republican leader Robert H. Michel of Illinois. Backers of Gingrich said that his 87-85 victory over the more traditional and less colorful Rep. Edward R. Madigan (R-Ill.) reflected a widespread demand for more aggressive tactics in dealing with the Democratic majority.
NEWS
January 2, 1989
House Minority Leader Robert H. Michel (R-Ill.) said higher taxes probably will be part of a bipartisan compromise budget plan in 1989. Michel said he does not believe that spending can be cut enough to meet deficit limits set by law. "I don't know that there is that much flexibility," he said. "I suspect (tax increases) may be part of the answer." Senate Minority Leader Bob Dole (R-Kan.
NEWS
February 18, 1993 | From Associated Press
Here is the text of the response of House Minority Leader Robert H. Michel (R-Ill.) to President Clinton's address Wednesday night to Congress: Good evening. Tonight you and I witnessed a colorful ritual: a new President of the United States addressing a joint session of Congress for the first time. The great chamber of the House rang out with cheers for the President. It was, as always, a thrilling spectacle. But now the last echo of the final cheer has faded away. The ceremony is over.
NEWS
March 16, 1988 | Associated Press
Former Chicago Mayor Jane M. Byrne's bid for a political comeback ended in defeat in Illinois' primary election Tuesday, but House Minority Leader Robert H. Michel, President Reagan's point man in Congress, easily overcame his first GOP challenge in 32 years. Michel's victory could set the stage for a November rematch of the 1982 contest that almost cost him his 18th District seat. Partial returns gave Michel 89% of the vote over Tazewell County Board Chairman James E. Unsicker.
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