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Robert H Sulnick

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1990
Oil, at the present rate of consumption, runs out in about 100 years. The vast reserves of the world's oil are in the Middle East. Even if we developed every ounce of Alaskan and offshore oil that the United States possesses, we would have created only a few years worth of energy. How then, in the face of the Middle East crisis, can the President and Congress justify a budget that gives $4-billion tax credit to the oil industry for development and exploration, while simultaneously cutting from the budget solar and renewable-energy tax credits?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1991
How many spills will it take before we realize that oil is a hazardous, toxic pollutant which destroys the environment and creates serious public health risks? The Mideast oil spill continues to decimate wildlife as it moves across the Persian Gulf, surfers continue to expose themselves to toxic insult at Huntington Beach and now oil is lapping up on the shores of Malibu. Oil in the environment is classified, by law, as a hazardous waste. Indeed the latest Chevron spill in Santa Monica Bay is a mixture of straight and ring chain hydrocarbons which contain such nasty chemical agents as hexane, pentane, benzene, xylene and toluene.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1991
How many spills will it take before we realize that oil is a hazardous, toxic pollutant which destroys the environment and creates serious public health risks? The Mideast oil spill continues to decimate wildlife as it moves across the Persian Gulf, surfers continue to expose themselves to toxic insult at Huntington Beach and now oil is lapping up on the shores of Malibu. Oil in the environment is classified, by law, as a hazardous waste. Indeed the latest Chevron spill in Santa Monica Bay is a mixture of straight and ring chain hydrocarbons which contain such nasty chemical agents as hexane, pentane, benzene, xylene and toluene.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1991
The Persian Gulf oil spill is the world's worst marine ecological disaster. The gulf, because it is a shallow (average depth 125 feet) virtually self-contained sea, cannot absorb over 100 million gallons of oil without wreaking havoc on its already fragile ecosystem. The Persian Gulf is home to a variety of exotic life forms. It has extensive coral reefs, salt marshes and sea grass beds. It supports populations of whales including the great blue whale, killer whale and minke whale as well as bottle nose, spinner, humpback and common dolphins.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1987
As president of No Oil Inc., I have come to know James Garner and Ted Danson as dedicated environmentalists who care about the future of California's Coast as a natural resource to be enjoyed by California residents and non-residents alike. Phyllis Genovese's letter, misstating Garner's and Danson's remarks was, therefore, very disturbing. Neither Ted Danson nor James Garner stated that the Occidental project involves drilling on the beach or in Santa Monica Bay. What they did say is that the oil field (of between 60 to 100 wells)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1991
The Persian Gulf oil spill is the world's worst marine ecological disaster. The gulf, because it is a shallow (average depth 125 feet) virtually self-contained sea, cannot absorb over 100 million gallons of oil without wreaking havoc on its already fragile ecosystem. The Persian Gulf is home to a variety of exotic life forms. It has extensive coral reefs, salt marshes and sea grass beds. It supports populations of whales including the great blue whale, killer whale and minke whale as well as bottle nose, spinner, humpback and common dolphins.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1988
Claims of a newly formed "citizens committee" financed by Occidental Petroleum Corp. supporting that company's proposed oil drilling project at Santa Monica Bay (Metro, Jan. 13) are ludicrous and totally unsupported by the facts. The Occidental drilling project is opposed not just by local environmentalists and Pacific Palisades homeowners. Scores of state and local environmental organizations and most of the elected officials from the Santa Monica Bay area also oppose it. The reasons for such opposition are simple, clear and decisive: First, the Occidental project is directly across from one of the most popular and widely-used beaches on Santa Monica Bay--Will Rogers State Beach.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1991
The pesticide spill once again proves that all of us do indeed live "downstream." Each of us, if only emotionally, will be affected by the disaster. We are a society addicted to toxics. The Sacramento River spill is killing an entire ecosystem. Plant, animal, and insect life is being annihilated. The toxic pesticide metam-sodium is sterilizing a habitat which will take a generation to recover. People and businesses dependent upon that habitat for both livelihood and pleasure will suffer greatly.
BUSINESS
June 23, 1990
Fifteen months after the worst oil tanker disaster in U.S. history at Valdez, Alaska, we discovered once again--this time in the Gulf of Mexico--that our government is still unprepared for major oil tanker accidents. Unbelievably, we lacked even proper firefighting equipment when the Mega Borg exploded in flames off the Texas coast. And oil spill emergency response teams, promised by the oil industry after the Exxon-Valdez spill, still haven't been formed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1990
In the wake of the defeat of Props. 128 and 130, it is clear that environmental politics must change. The environmental Establishment must reach out and attract to its cause, minorities, labor, religion, medicine, the women's movement and industries, such as the alternative fuels industries, the tourist, surf and fishing industries, all of which have a vested interest in a clean environment. Such an environmental coalition would have clout. The opposition to Props. 128 and 130, the oil, pesticide and petrochemical industries, spent in excess of $12 million to defeat the initiatives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1990
Oil, at the present rate of consumption, runs out in about 100 years. The vast reserves of the world's oil are in the Middle East. Even if we developed every ounce of Alaskan and offshore oil that the United States possesses, we would have created only a few years worth of energy. How then, in the face of the Middle East crisis, can the President and Congress justify a budget that gives $4-billion tax credit to the oil industry for development and exploration, while simultaneously cutting from the budget solar and renewable-energy tax credits?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1988
Claims of a newly formed "citizens committee" financed by Occidental Petroleum Corp. supporting that company's proposed oil drilling project at Santa Monica Bay (Metro, Jan. 13) are ludicrous and totally unsupported by the facts. The Occidental drilling project is opposed not just by local environmentalists and Pacific Palisades homeowners. Scores of state and local environmental organizations and most of the elected officials from the Santa Monica Bay area also oppose it. The reasons for such opposition are simple, clear and decisive: First, the Occidental project is directly across from one of the most popular and widely-used beaches on Santa Monica Bay--Will Rogers State Beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1987
As president of No Oil Inc., I have come to know James Garner and Ted Danson as dedicated environmentalists who care about the future of California's Coast as a natural resource to be enjoyed by California residents and non-residents alike. Phyllis Genovese's letter, misstating Garner's and Danson's remarks was, therefore, very disturbing. Neither Ted Danson nor James Garner stated that the Occidental project involves drilling on the beach or in Santa Monica Bay. What they did say is that the oil field (of between 60 to 100 wells)
NEWS
October 2, 1990 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A key congressional committee Monday approved another one-year extension of the ban on new offshore oil drilling in federal waters off the California coast. Despite concerns about domestic oil production prompted by Iraq's invasion of Kuwait, the vote "shows that we can still use this moratorium process to protect the coast of California," said Robert H. Sulnick, executive director of the Santa Monica-based American Oceans Campaign. Rep.
NEWS
September 29, 1985
Occidental Petroleum Corp. is offering residents up to $500 as a "prepayment incentive" to renew their oil lease agreements, according to spokesman Howard Collins. Robert H. Sulnick, president of No Oil Inc., said that the payments amount to "a bribe." Occidental is required to lease the oil rights of 75% of the land in the oil-drilling area as part of its controversial plan to drill at the base of the Palisades bluffs on Pacific Coast Highway.
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