Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRobert H Willis
IN THE NEWS

Robert H Willis

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
July 28, 1989 | SCOT J. PALTROW, Times Staff Writer
A Manhattan psychiatrist was indicted on criminal insider trading charges for allegedly having bought stock in BankAmerica Corp. after a patient, during the course of treatment, revealed confidential information involving the company. The psychiatrist, Robert H. Willis, 50, was named in a 46-count indictment on mail fraud and securities fraud charges stemming from the alleged insider trading. The indictment was returned late Wednesday by a federal grand jury in Manhattan.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
July 28, 1989 | SCOT J. PALTROW, Times Staff Writer
A Manhattan psychiatrist was indicted on criminal insider trading charges for allegedly having bought stock in BankAmerica Corp. after a patient, during the course of treatment, revealed confidential information involving the company. The psychiatrist, Robert H. Willis, 50, was named in a 46-count indictment on mail fraud and securities fraud charges stemming from the alleged insider trading. The indictment was returned late Wednesday by a federal grand jury in Manhattan.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
December 3, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Insider Trading Indictment Upheld: A federal judge refused to throw out the insider trading indictment against Dr. Robert H. Willis, a New York psychiatrist who allegedly played the stock market based on information obtained from patient Joan Weill, the wife of financier Sanford I. Weill.
BUSINESS
August 11, 1989 | From Reuters
A psychiatrist pleaded innocent Thursday to charges that he illegally traded on confidential information about BankAmerica Corp. that was revealed by a patient during therapy. The patient had learned from her husband about a 1986 attempt by Sanford I. Weill, former chief executive of Shearson Loeb Rhodes, to take the helm of BankAmerica Corp. and pump money into the company.
BUSINESS
November 19, 1991 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A psychiatrist who admitted that he played the stock market based on confidential information he learned from a patient is not necessarily guilty of insider trading, a U.S. District Court judge said in a ruling released Monday. The decision, by U.S. District Judge Miriam G. Cederbaum, was based on last month's landmark appellate court decision--United States vs. Chestman--that limits the ability of prosecutors to go after certain investors who trade on confidential information.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|