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Robert Haft

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BUSINESS
June 25, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Falling victim in the latest round of a corporate family's feud, Robert Haft--known nationwide for his televised commercial pitches for Crown Books--was removed Thursday from the company's board. Dart Group, a Landover, Md.-based firm that has controlling interest in Crown Books, said Haft, 40, was removed "pursuant to the chairman's authority to act by written consent under Delaware corporate law." Haft's 72-year-old father, Herbert H. Haft, is chairman of Dart Group.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2004 | From the Washington Post
Herbert H. Haft, the multimillionaire discount retailer whose business empire dissolved in a nasty and very public family feud in the 1990s, has died. He was 84. Haft, who had heart disease, died Wednesday at a Washington, D.C., hospital. Over a 30-year period, Haft built Dart Drugs from a single drugstore in Washington to a chain of 77 stores. He then expanded, creating Trak Auto, Crown Books, Shoppers Food Warehouse and Total Beverage.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2004 | From the Washington Post
Herbert H. Haft, the multimillionaire discount retailer whose business empire dissolved in a nasty and very public family feud in the 1990s, has died. He was 84. Haft, who had heart disease, died Wednesday at a Washington, D.C., hospital. Over a 30-year period, Haft built Dart Drugs from a single drugstore in Washington to a chain of 77 stores. He then expanded, creating Trak Auto, Crown Books, Shoppers Food Warehouse and Total Beverage.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2000 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One might think Robert and Herbert Haft--the son and father who led the big retailer Dart Group until their nasty public feud ultimately drove the business into the ground in the '90s--would quietly enjoy their remaining fortunes in welcome, tranquil obscurity. But that's not the Hafts. Robert Haft, 47, now runs a company called Vitamins.com that combines an Internet site, 10 bricks-and-mortar stores, a toll-free telephone number and a catalog to peddle vitamins and health supplements.
BUSINESS
September 21, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Robert Haft Wins $34.1-Million Award: Haft, 41, filed the suit against Dart Group Corp. and its operating companies, Crown Books Corp. and Trak Auto Corp., charging that he had been fired without cause as president of Dart last year by his father, Dart Chairman and founder Herbert Haft, in a struggle for succession. A U.S. District Court jury, after deliberating less than three hours, awarded Robert Haft damages of $18.8 million from Dart, $12.
BUSINESS
August 12, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Haft Family Legal Brawl Escalates Again: Robert Haft sued three companies controlled by his father, Herbert, seeking to recover millions of dollars in stock and long-term compensation he lost when the elder Haft fired him in June. Robert's breach-of-contract lawsuit, filed in a Delaware federal District Court, had none of the sensational charges of physical and financial abuse that were contained in the separation suit filed by his mother, Gloria, Tuesday in Washington.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2000 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One might think Robert and Herbert Haft--the son and father who led the big retailer Dart Group until their nasty public feud ultimately drove the business into the ground in the '90s--would quietly enjoy their remaining fortunes in welcome, tranquil obscurity. But that's not the Hafts. Robert Haft, 47, now runs a company called Vitamins.com that combines an Internet site, 10 bricks-and-mortar stores, a toll-free telephone number and a catalog to peddle vitamins and health supplements.
BUSINESS
December 21, 1987 | STEVE COLL and DAVID A. VISE, The Washington Post and
New York Stock Exchange investigators looking into possible manipulation of the stock of a midwestern food company by the investment firm Drexel Burnham Lambert last year concluded that Washington's Haft family was probably "acting on instructions" from Drexel when it purchased a large block of the food company's stock. The food firm, Chicago-based Staley Continental, had charged in a lawsuit that Drexel engineered heavy trading in its stock so that Staley would use Drexel's services.
BUSINESS
July 18, 1993 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is a battle mean and nasty enough to be soap opera--a tale of two generations struggling for the control of a billion-dollar retailing empire that encompasses such disparate chains as Crown Books and Trak Auto. The ongoing Haft family wars pit a street-smart father who amassed a fortune in real estate and discount drugstores against his Harvard Business School-educated son, whose genius is in marketing. At stake is ultimate control of Dart Group Corp.
BUSINESS
September 14, 1988 | Associated Press
Kroger Co. said Tuesday that it is considering a $3.77-billion restructuring plan but added that the proposal was not specifically designed to ward off a possible hostile takeover bid by Herbert and Robert Haft. Kroger, one of the nation's largest grocery chains, said it is asking its directors to approve a plan that would plunge the company into debt but keep it publicly owned. Kroger has 1,300 supermarkets and other operations in 29 states. The announcement sent Kroger stock soaring $11.
BUSINESS
August 30, 1995
Bankruptcy Court Confirms Phar-Mor Reorganization Plan: The Youngstown, Ohio-based deep-discount retailer said it will apply for its stock to be listed on the Nasdaq system within 10 days. Under the plan, an investment group led by Robert Haft will receive 31% of the company. Senior secured lenders will own 49% and the unsecured creditors will own 12%. Haft will become chairman and chief executive of the publicly traded company. Senior secured lenders will receive about $102.
BUSINESS
August 25, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Haft Family Feud Plays On: Lawyers for multimillionaire businessman Herbert Haft accused his wife and eldest son of violence against him and denied that Haft was trying to drive them from the family business. The attorneys indicated that in family disputes that followed eldest son Robert's attempt last spring to succeed Haft as head of Dart Group Corp.
BUSINESS
July 18, 1993 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is a battle mean and nasty enough to be soap opera--a tale of two generations struggling for the control of a billion-dollar retailing empire that encompasses such disparate chains as Crown Books and Trak Auto. The ongoing Haft family wars pit a street-smart father who amassed a fortune in real estate and discount drugstores against his Harvard Business School-educated son, whose genius is in marketing. At stake is ultimate control of Dart Group Corp.
BUSINESS
June 25, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Falling victim in the latest round of a corporate family's feud, Robert Haft--known nationwide for his televised commercial pitches for Crown Books--was removed Thursday from the company's board. Dart Group, a Landover, Md.-based firm that has controlling interest in Crown Books, said Haft, 40, was removed "pursuant to the chairman's authority to act by written consent under Delaware corporate law." Haft's 72-year-old father, Herbert H. Haft, is chairman of Dart Group.
BUSINESS
June 8, 1993 | KARA SWISHER, THE WASHINGTON POST
Herbert H. Haft removed his wife and son from the board of the family holding company Dart Group Corp. on Monday, making them casualties in the widening feud over the leadership of the Washington-area-based retail and real estate empire. Haft is the 72-year-old family patriarch and majority shareholder of Dart, the multimillion-dollar company that controls the Crown Books, Trak Auto and Shoppers Food Warehouse retail chains.
BUSINESS
July 5, 1991 | HAL FOSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First there were the Home Improvement Wars--Home Depot versus Home Club. Then came the Electronic Wars--Circuit City versus Silo. Now, the Battle of the Books has come to Southern California. Two national chains are going head-to-head in the lucrative Southland market with plans to open dozens of super bookstores--the latest wrinkle in retailing's superstore boom--over the next several years. Only three are open now. The big winners in the battle between Bookstar Inc. of Austin, Tex.
BUSINESS
October 13, 1988 | From the Washington Post
The Haft family of Washington, with one eye still on a possible merger with Kroger Co., now is seeking to buy $15 million of stock in Walgreen Co., the nation's largest drugstore operator. The Hafts' action is the latest in a series of forays against major retailing companies in recent years by the father-son team of Herbert and Robert Haft, who have gained a reputation on Wall Street as corporate raiders interested in profiting from the pursuit of companies rather than completing takeovers.
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