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Robert Hanssen

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2007 | Gina Piccalo, Times Staff Writer
AS a baby-faced undercover FBI operative, Eric O'Neill, at the time just 27, duped America's most notorious double agent, Robert Hanssen, a paranoid egomaniac and sexual deviant who kept a stash of automatic weapons in his trunk. By comparison, Hollywood's menagerie of control freaks was child's play. Pitch meetings didn't really challenge him, he said, because espionage and movie-making demand a similar skill set: nerves of steel, preternatural charm and a high pain threshold.
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NATIONAL
October 2, 2007 | Richard B.Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
Six years after one of its own agents was caught spying for Russia, the FBI remains vulnerable to espionage from its own ranks, according to a Justice Department report. Since the 2001 arrest of double agent Robert Hanssen, the agency has taken a number of steps to improve internal security. But its ability to track turncoats may work better in theory than in practice, according to the report that gives mixed grades to the agency and its handling of threats from within.
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OPINION
May 18, 2002
Re "FBI Spy Contrite, Gets Life Sentence," May 11: Convicted FBI spy Robert Hanssen's wife is allowed to keep the survivor's portion of his pension (a reported $40,000 a year), not to mention their nice house and three cars. Meanwhile, grandmas are being kicked out of projects if someone passes through with drugs (with or without their knowledge), and in the name of the drug war, rich and poor alike suffer their assets being seized by the government before even being convicted in court.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2007 | Choire Sicha, Special to The Times
BILLY RAY doesn't ever go to the Ivy. He lives in Los Angeles with his wife, Stacy Sherman. His second turn as director, "Breach," is the story of the takedown of FBI agent Robert Hanssen, who sold secrets to the Soviets for more than 20 years. It opened in theaters Friday. His writing credits include "Flightplan" and "Volcano." The FBI was of some assistance to you in your research on Robert Hanssen -- even passing along questions (that went unanswered) to him in prison.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2001
In Howard Rosenberg's Dec. 21 column ("Spy the Flaws as '60 Minutes' Tries to Peer Into the Mind of a Mole"), he asked the question: "How were [Norman] Mailer and [Lawrence] Schiller able to gain access to [Robert] Hanssen's mind...?" "60 Minutes" was provided with that answer; however the response did not make the final cut. Here is a complete answer. Interviews conducted by Mailer and myself began in March 2001 and are still going on as I finish the book that will be published in April 2002.
OPINION
July 8, 2001
Re "Accused Spy Cuts Deal to Save His Life," July 4: It is heartwarming, indeed, to read that Robert Hanssen's plea agreement with the Justice Department includes not only Justice's agreement to refrain from seeking the death penalty but also its acquiescence in payment of part of his pension to Hanssen's wife and children. It's nice to know that he's now concerned with the welfare of his family. And where was that concern when he was spying for Russia? His family was around then, but he apparently didn't consider the outcome of the course he chose.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2007 | Choire Sicha, Special to The Times
BILLY RAY doesn't ever go to the Ivy. He lives in Los Angeles with his wife, Stacy Sherman. His second turn as director, "Breach," is the story of the takedown of FBI agent Robert Hanssen, who sold secrets to the Soviets for more than 20 years. It opened in theaters Friday. His writing credits include "Flightplan" and "Volcano." The FBI was of some assistance to you in your research on Robert Hanssen -- even passing along questions (that went unanswered) to him in prison.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2007 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
FILLED with tension, deception and bravura acting, "Breach" is a crackling tale of real-life espionage that doubles as a compelling psychological drama. Its core is not the minutiae of spying but the push-pull complexities of intricate human relationships, and in Ryan Phillippe, Laura Linney and especially the formidable Chris Cooper, it has the cast to bring it all intensely alive. The title comes from a clip of a Feb. 19, 2001, news conference statement by John Ashcroft that opens the film.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2002 | Anthony Day, Special to The Times
'Spy' 'The Inside Story of How the FBI's Robert Hanssen Betrayed America' David Wise Random House; 310 pp., $24.95 * David Wise's "Spy" presents two conundrums: Why did Robert Hanssen, who long sat at or near the center of the FBI's counterintelligence operations, betray everything he knew -- about 6,000 pages of top-secret U.S. material -- to the Russians for 22 years? And why did the FBI and the rest of the U.S. intelligence apparatus fail to catch him for so long?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2002 | Howard Rosenberg, Times Staff Writer
John le Carre was probably on the mark when he called spies "a squalid procession of vain fools, traitors ... sadists and drunkards, people who play cowboys and Indians to brighten their rotten lives." Much of real-life espionage is surely James Bond-less, offering less excitement and glamour than tedium and drudgery.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2007 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
FILLED with tension, deception and bravura acting, "Breach" is a crackling tale of real-life espionage that doubles as a compelling psychological drama. Its core is not the minutiae of spying but the push-pull complexities of intricate human relationships, and in Ryan Phillippe, Laura Linney and especially the formidable Chris Cooper, it has the cast to bring it all intensely alive. The title comes from a clip of a Feb. 19, 2001, news conference statement by John Ashcroft that opens the film.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2007 | Gina Piccalo, Times Staff Writer
AS a baby-faced undercover FBI operative, Eric O'Neill, at the time just 27, duped America's most notorious double agent, Robert Hanssen, a paranoid egomaniac and sexual deviant who kept a stash of automatic weapons in his trunk. By comparison, Hollywood's menagerie of control freaks was child's play. Pitch meetings didn't really challenge him, he said, because espionage and movie-making demand a similar skill set: nerves of steel, preternatural charm and a high pain threshold.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2007 | Mary McNamara, Times Staff Writer
HERE is how Chris Cooper knows he is doing his job well: Someone approaches him in the grocery store, gives him that don't-I-know-you? squint and says, "Did we go to school together?" Probably not, Cooper says, but you might know me from films. "Nooo," is the invariable answer. "Are you sure we didn't go to school together?" "That's the whole point, isn't it?"
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2002 | Anthony Day, Special to The Times
'Spy' 'The Inside Story of How the FBI's Robert Hanssen Betrayed America' David Wise Random House; 310 pp., $24.95 * David Wise's "Spy" presents two conundrums: Why did Robert Hanssen, who long sat at or near the center of the FBI's counterintelligence operations, betray everything he knew -- about 6,000 pages of top-secret U.S. material -- to the Russians for 22 years? And why did the FBI and the rest of the U.S. intelligence apparatus fail to catch him for so long?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2002 | Howard Rosenberg, Times Staff Writer
John le Carre was probably on the mark when he called spies "a squalid procession of vain fools, traitors ... sadists and drunkards, people who play cowboys and Indians to brighten their rotten lives." Much of real-life espionage is surely James Bond-less, offering less excitement and glamour than tedium and drudgery.
OPINION
May 18, 2002
Re "FBI Spy Contrite, Gets Life Sentence," May 11: Convicted FBI spy Robert Hanssen's wife is allowed to keep the survivor's portion of his pension (a reported $40,000 a year), not to mention their nice house and three cars. Meanwhile, grandmas are being kicked out of projects if someone passes through with drugs (with or without their knowledge), and in the name of the drug war, rich and poor alike suffer their assets being seized by the government before even being convicted in court.
NATIONAL
October 2, 2007 | Richard B.Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
Six years after one of its own agents was caught spying for Russia, the FBI remains vulnerable to espionage from its own ranks, according to a Justice Department report. Since the 2001 arrest of double agent Robert Hanssen, the agency has taken a number of steps to improve internal security. But its ability to track turncoats may work better in theory than in practice, according to the report that gives mixed grades to the agency and its handling of threats from within.
NEWS
July 29, 2001 | JONATHAN DANN and J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At the same time he was selling U.S. secrets to the Soviet Union, former FBI special agent Robert Philip Hanssen was a key supervisor in a 1980s domestic-spying program questioning the loyalty of American citizens and monitoring their activities, newly obtained FBI documents show. Under this program, federal agents filed reports on teachers, clerics and political activists who primarily were affiliated with liberal causes.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2001
In Howard Rosenberg's Dec. 21 column ("Spy the Flaws as '60 Minutes' Tries to Peer Into the Mind of a Mole"), he asked the question: "How were [Norman] Mailer and [Lawrence] Schiller able to gain access to [Robert] Hanssen's mind...?" "60 Minutes" was provided with that answer; however the response did not make the final cut. Here is a complete answer. Interviews conducted by Mailer and myself began in March 2001 and are still going on as I finish the book that will be published in April 2002.
NEWS
July 29, 2001 | JONATHAN DANN and J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At the same time he was selling U.S. secrets to the Soviet Union, former FBI special agent Robert Philip Hanssen was a key supervisor in a 1980s domestic-spying program questioning the loyalty of American citizens and monitoring their activities, newly obtained FBI documents show. Under this program, federal agents filed reports on teachers, clerics and political activists who primarily were affiliated with liberal causes.
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