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Robert Harbrant

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BUSINESS
March 8, 1988 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
Even though the nation's pension funds lost a bundle in the market on Oct. 19, Black Monday, nearly $2 trillion is still left in reserves for money managers to handle, and they come up daily with ideas for investing those vast sums. The primary goal must be to manipulate the money so it will increase and thereby help ensure pensions for retirees.
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BUSINESS
March 8, 1988 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
Even though the nation's pension funds lost a bundle in the market on Oct. 19, Black Monday, nearly $2 trillion is still left in reserves for money managers to handle, and they come up daily with ideas for investing those vast sums. The primary goal must be to manipulate the money so it will increase and thereby help ensure pensions for retirees.
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NEWS
October 27, 1987 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
With the end of the Reagan era approaching, America's workers are "on the road again to a resurgent labor movement, with growing numbers, stronger organizations, deeper solidarity and a voice that will be heard," AFL-CIO President Lane Kirkland asserted here Monday. In his keynote address on the opening day of the 12.
BUSINESS
August 7, 1990 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
More unions in non-communist nations, including the United States, are adopting the old battle cry that Karl Marx promulgated in his 1848 Communist Manifesto: "Workers of the world, unite!" The latest call for unity arises this week from union leaders of 21 countries who are meeting in Washington to develop ways for dealing with the anti-labor, anti-union tactics of many giant multinational corporations.
NEWS
February 22, 1987 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
Throughout Ronald Reagan's tenure in the White House, the leaders of organized labor have gone to their annual meeting here facing unmitigated disaster. The crushing of the air traffic controllers' strike in 1981 was followed by hostile rulings from the National Labor Relations Board and a steady decline in union ranks. They adjourned this year's meeting Friday, however, in the most upbeat mood in several years.
NEWS
October 30, 1987 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
Facing federal prosecution and battling cancer, Teamsters President Jackie Presser received several standing ovations here Thursday as the union was welcomed back into the AFL-CIO after a 30-year exile. "Today, without question, is a historic event," said Presser, after flashing a thumbs up sign and thanking the delegates to the AFL-CIO convention for their enthusiastic welcome. "I believe the future will hold that the Teamsters Union being back in the AFL, joining forces together . . .
NEWS
February 25, 1985 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
These have not been easy times for Bill Bywater, the energetic, 64-year-old head of an organization once known as the International Union of Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers. Last year, Bywater told his staff that the union, whose membership had plunged from 360,000 to 180,000 since 1970, no longer had an appropriate name because it no longer represented any workers making radios. So Bywater took a step that he thought was long overdue and dropped "radio" from the title.
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