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Robert Harris

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2010 | By Nicholas A. Basbanes
As the second installment in British novelist Robert Harris' trilogy of cutthroat politics and intrigue during the late Roman Republic opens, Marcus Tullius Cicero is about to assume the consulship of Rome, the position of supreme authority he had secured against all odds in "Imperium," the first volume in the series. What should be, in "Conspirata," a time of great joy and satisfaction for the legendary politician of antiquity is jolted by the shocking discovery in the Tiber River of a young slave who appears to have been killed and mutilated as part of an ominous ritual.
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NATIONAL
September 20, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON -- Texas executed its eighth inmate this year on Thursday, a former Dallas-area car wash employee convicted of killing two co-workers a week after he was fired in 2000. Robert Wayne Harris, 40, was executed in Huntsville at 6:43 p.m. with a lethal dose of the sedative pentobarbital. His last statement: “I want to let y'all  know that I love you, Billy, I love you, English, Hart and Eloise.  Dwight, take care of Dwight.  I'm going home, I'm going home.  I'll be all right, don't worry, I love y'all.
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BOOKS
August 10, 1986 | Kenneth Reich, Reich is a Times staff writer who has written frequently on espionage
This is more than just the story of how newspaper tycoon Rupert Murdoch, renowned historian Hugh Trevor-Roper and the editors of one of West Germany's leading magazines, Stern, were taken in by a crude forgery, by humdrum chronicles written on postwar paper by a petty crook and passed off as the diaries of Adolf Hitler. It is also a depressing but fascinating account of how the traffic in Hitler and Nazi memorabilia has become big business in both the United States and Europe.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2010
Conspirata A Novel Robert Harris Simon & Schuster: 342 pp., $26
BOOKS
July 5, 1992 | Mark Horowitz, Horowitz has written for the New York Times, the Washington Post and Film Comment.
One of my favorite books growing up was a dog-eared paperback novel called, "If the South Had Won the Civil War." Those two magical words-- what if --shattered the aura of inevitability that always made the past seem so dead. They showed me that real history was something alive and unpredictable. "Fatherland," the first novel by Robert Harris, a political columnist for the London Sunday Times, is predicated on another historical travesty: What if the Nazis had won World War II?
NEWS
April 20, 1992 | LYN RIDDLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Like something from an American history text, Robert E. Harris saunters into town atop his steadfast steed, Sundance, carrying only a weathered Bible and some religious pamphlets. Except for his white shirt, he is adorned in black: frock coat, pants, string tie and a 10-gallon Stetson. Dismounting, he turns to several astonished folks and begins preaching a simple Christian message. He does this every day there is good weather here in the mountain towns of western North Carolina.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1990 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT and ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Gov. George Deukmejian announced Wednesday that he has canceled next week's clemency hearing for condemned killer Robert Alton Harris, saying he was merely carrying out the convicted murderer's wishes. Meanwhile, the celebrated champion of the poor and dying, Mother Teresa, jumped into the fight to save Harris' life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1992 | CHARLES M. SEVILLA, Charles M. Sevilla is one of the San Diego attorneys who has been handling appeals for Robert Alton Harris. and
Robert Alton Harris is scheduled to be executed by the state of California on the night after Easter, a Sunday when many will be recalling Christ's teachings of love, mercy and redemption. That we should be killing a man within hours of this holy day bespeaks of our collective numbness to our professed belief in his message: "Vengeance is mine saith the Lord." If it happens, it will be a sad and painful day for me as well as the many dedicated people who have worked in Robert Harris' behalf.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1992 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Relegated to phone contact only, lawyer Charles M. Sevilla dialed the holding cell where Robert Alton Harris was waiting to walk to his death at San Quentin's gas chamber. Warden Daniel Vasquez answered. The warden and the defense attorney had quarreled over differences in the past, Vasquez acknowledged, but the time for that was over. "This man will be treated right," Vasquez told the lawyer. "I promise you that." "The warden kept his promise," Sevilla wrote in his journal afterward.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1992 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sharron Mankins has this recurring vision of the day Robert Alton Harris snuffed the life out of her son, Michael Baker. "I can just see these terrified boys," she said. It's July 5, 1978. Harris abducts Michael Baker and his best friend, John Mayeski, both 16, from a fast-food restaurant. He needs their car for a bank robbery. He forces them in the car and drives them a few miles away, to a remote wash near a reservoir.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2010 | By Nicholas A. Basbanes
As the second installment in British novelist Robert Harris' trilogy of cutthroat politics and intrigue during the late Roman Republic opens, Marcus Tullius Cicero is about to assume the consulship of Rome, the position of supreme authority he had secured against all odds in "Imperium," the first volume in the series. What should be, in "Conspirata," a time of great joy and satisfaction for the legendary politician of antiquity is jolted by the shocking discovery in the Tiber River of a young slave who appears to have been killed and mutilated as part of an ominous ritual.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2009 | Carol J. Williams
Melvin Brunetti, a federal appeals court judge for the last 24 years whose opinions included upholding anti-hate crime legislation, broader Pentagon scrutiny of homosexuals' security clearances and the death penalty for Robert Alton Harris, has died. He was 75. Brunetti died Friday at his home in Reno after a long battle with cancer, his family told the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, to which he had been appointed by President Reagan in 1985. He had been on senior status with the appeals court since 1999, a semi-retirement in which a judge is replaced on the active roster but continues to handle a reduced caseload.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2008 | MARY McNAMARA, TELEVISION CRITIC
"Archangel," which premieres on Ion at 8 Saturday night, is a 3-year-old, three-hour-long BBC drama set in modern-day Russia. And oh, yeah, it stars Daniel Craig, he of the icy blue eyes and the James Bond franchise, which is about to send its latest installment, the remarkably titled "Quantum of Solace," into theaters everywhere. So if you're wondering why "Archangel," which no one has ever heard of, is suddenly popping up on American TV, there's your answer.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2006 | Nicholas A. Basbanes, Special to The Times
THE mark of a superior historical novel is not always an erudite rendering of the recorded past but what the author imagines could have happened within the framework of the known. Put in other words, it is the "what if" factor that often makes for a compelling story, a skill that has been mastered by British novelist Robert Harris, a onetime correspondent for the BBC and a former political columnist for the London Sunday Times and Daily Telegraph.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Robert Harry Smith, 73, a biblical scholar who was dean of a Lutheran seminary in exile in the early 1980s, died of complications from leukemia March 16 at his home in El Cerrito, Calif. Smith was one of 40 faculty members from the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod's Concordia Seminary in St. Louis who walked out in 1974 in a theological dispute that ended with the ousting of Concordia's president, the Rev. John Tietjen.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2010
Conspirata A Novel Robert Harris Simon & Schuster: 342 pp., $26
NEWS
April 21, 1992 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the life history of Robert Alton Harris, two facts stand out: The murders that put him on Death Row were heartless, and he seemed destined to die strapped down in an execution chamber somewhere. That life began at an Army hospital in Ft. Bragg, N. C., on Jan. 15, 1953, the day a drunken soldier named Kenneth Harris kicked his alcoholic wife in the gut, sending her into labor two months early. Sgt. Kenneth Harris had won a Silver Star and Purple Heart in World War II.
BOOKS
December 19, 1999 | CARI BEAUCHAMP, Cari Beauchamp is the author of "Without Lying Down: Frances Marion and the Powerful Women of Early Hollywood" (Scribner / UC Press) and is currently working on a documentary based on her book for Turner Classic Movies
There had been stage stars and eminent personalities before Mary Pickford, but they were assumed to be exceptional and inimitable. Mary Pickford not only radiated a universal feminine humanity, she also was accessible in a way no famous person had been before: You could feel you knew her, albeit through celluloid, by going around the corner to the neighborhood nickelodeon. Movies in their infancy were more than entertainment; they were a window on a new world.
BOOKS
February 21, 1999 | EUGEN WEBER, Eugen Weber is the Joan Palevsky professor of modern European history at UCLA. His column "L.A. Confidential" appears monthly and is devoted to mysteries and thrillers
Killings and killer catching are no longer enough to sell detective stories. "Been there, done that" calls for ever more imaginative settings. Travelogues, procedurals, craft guides, job descriptions and, not the least, explorations of the investigator's psyche proliferate until the luxuriant context, like a creeper, gobbles up the action. None of this is necessarily bad, as Patricia Cornwell's Dr. Kay Scarpetta reliably demonstrates.
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