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Robert Harth

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 1986
In his review of the Tom Stoppard-Andre Previn "Every Good Boy Deserves Favour," Albert Goldberg stated that "the orchestra never plays during the speaking," whereas the fact is that there are a full 17 minutes when the orchestra provides musical underpinning for spoken parts by the actors ("West Coast Premiere of 'Every Good Boy,' " Dec. 20). This represents a substantial amount of time that actors and orchestra are performing simultaneously--nearly one-quarter of the piece's 73 minutes.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2004 | From Associated Press
Months after his sudden death, Carnegie Hall's late director, Robert Harth, got a standing ovation -- at a concert in his memory Thursday in America's premier hall. Carnegie distributed free tickets to anyone who wanted to hear singer Audra McDonald, pianist Emanuel Ax, the Emerson String Quartet and conductor James Levine with his top Metropolitan Opera Orchestra players -- all of them appearing gratis.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1985 | DANIEL CARIAGA
Ernest Fleischmann, executive director of the Los Angeles Philharmonic and artistic director of Hollywood Bowl, will take a three-month sabbatical from his Bowl duties beginning in May. Fleischmann announced that his absence will be "a real vacation." However, the 60-year-old orchestra administrator would not reveal his vacation destination, but indicated that he "will be all over the place. "I will try to hear a lot of music. I want to see what is going on, beyond the area covered by smog.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2004 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
From the moment Robert J. Harth was found dead of an apparent heart attack in his New York apartment Friday night, the shock waves began reverberating through the music community. Harth was 47 and in his three years as executive director of Carnegie Hall had weathered several crises. He had also brought a fresh spirit to a venerable arts institution, especially in the wonderfully diverse programming of Zankel Hall, the 644-seat underground venue that opened last September.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2004 | From Associated Press
Months after his sudden death, Carnegie Hall's late director, Robert Harth, got a standing ovation -- at a concert in his memory Thursday in America's premier hall. Carnegie distributed free tickets to anyone who wanted to hear singer Audra McDonald, pianist Emanuel Ax, the Emerson String Quartet and conductor James Levine with his top Metropolitan Opera Orchestra players -- all of them appearing gratis.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1989 | DANIEL CARIAGA, Times Music Writer
For the past decade, Wayne Shilkret, performing-arts director of the Ambassador International Cultural Foundation, has been perceived as the chief impresarial rival of Los Angeles Philharmonic Managing Director Ernest Fleischmann. But now that Shilkret, 55, has been named new general manager of Hollywood Bowl, succeeding the outgoing Robert Harth on July 1 as second in command at the Philharmonic, Fleischmann will be his boss. In naming Shilkret to the newly created position, Fleischman commented he was following the dictum, "If you can't beat 'em, have 'em join you."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2004 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
From the moment Robert J. Harth was found dead of an apparent heart attack in his New York apartment Friday night, the shock waves began reverberating through the music community. Harth was 47 and in his three years as executive director of Carnegie Hall had weathered several crises. He had also brought a fresh spirit to a venerable arts institution, especially in the wonderfully diverse programming of Zankel Hall, the 644-seat underground venue that opened last September.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Robert Harth, who became head of New York City's prestigious Carnegie Hall days after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks and led America's premier classical music venue into an adventurous new era, has died. He was 47. Harth, who served as general manager of the Los Angeles Philharmonic from 1979 to 1989, second in command to former executive director Ernest Fleishmann, died Friday in his Manhattan apartment. The cause was a heart attack, Carnegie spokeswoman Ann Diebold said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1993 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Colorado-Bound: Ara Guzelimian, artistic administrator of the Los Angeles Philharmonic Assn. since 1986, has been appointed artistic administrator at the Aspen Music Festival and School in Colorado, effective Oct. 1. The announcement was made by Aspen Festival president Robert Harth, Guzelimian's former colleague at the Philharmonic, where he was general manager for 10 years (1979-1989). In Aspen, Guzelimian, 38, will work with another L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Robert Harth, general manager of the Los Angeles Philharmonic Assn., has accepted an appointment as president and chief executive officer of the Aspen Music Festival and School in Colorado, effective Oct. 1. He will replace longtime Aspen chief Gordon Hardy, who will retire from his post after 28 years. Harth formerly spent 12 summers working at Aspen (1963-74). He then worked in various capacities at the Ravinia Festival in Chicago before joining the L.A. Philharmonic in 1979.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Robert Harth, who became head of New York City's prestigious Carnegie Hall days after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks and led America's premier classical music venue into an adventurous new era, has died. He was 47. Harth, who served as general manager of the Los Angeles Philharmonic from 1979 to 1989, second in command to former executive director Ernest Fleishmann, died Friday in his Manhattan apartment. The cause was a heart attack, Carnegie spokeswoman Ann Diebold said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1989 | DANIEL CARIAGA, Times Music Writer
For the past decade, Wayne Shilkret, performing-arts director of the Ambassador International Cultural Foundation, has been perceived as the chief impresarial rival of Los Angeles Philharmonic Managing Director Ernest Fleischmann. But now that Shilkret, 55, has been named new general manager of Hollywood Bowl, succeeding the outgoing Robert Harth on July 1 as second in command at the Philharmonic, Fleischmann will be his boss. In naming Shilkret to the newly created position, Fleischman commented he was following the dictum, "If you can't beat 'em, have 'em join you."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 1986
In his review of the Tom Stoppard-Andre Previn "Every Good Boy Deserves Favour," Albert Goldberg stated that "the orchestra never plays during the speaking," whereas the fact is that there are a full 17 minutes when the orchestra provides musical underpinning for spoken parts by the actors ("West Coast Premiere of 'Every Good Boy,' " Dec. 20). This represents a substantial amount of time that actors and orchestra are performing simultaneously--nearly one-quarter of the piece's 73 minutes.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1985 | DANIEL CARIAGA
Ernest Fleischmann, executive director of the Los Angeles Philharmonic and artistic director of Hollywood Bowl, will take a three-month sabbatical from his Bowl duties beginning in May. Fleischmann announced that his absence will be "a real vacation." However, the 60-year-old orchestra administrator would not reveal his vacation destination, but indicated that he "will be all over the place. "I will try to hear a lot of music. I want to see what is going on, beyond the area covered by smog.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1985 | DANIEL CARIAGA, Times Staff Writer
Harassed by a single but noisy helicopter in the quiet opening section of Part II of Gustav Mahler's gargantuan Symphony No. 8, Tuesday night, Michael Tilson Thomas did not glower, or curse the skies, as some other conductors have done at Hollywood Bowl. He didn't halt the performance and give a speech, He didn't stop and wait for the intrusion to end. He simply left the stage. It was a dramatic gesture, coming as it did nearly a quarter-hour into the hourlong second movement.
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