Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRobert Hass
IN THE NEWS

Robert Hass

FEATURED ARTICLES
BOOKS
February 14, 1999
Many are making love. Up above, the angels in the unshaken ether and crystal of human longing are braiding one another's hair, which is strawberry blond and the texture of cold rivers. They glance down from time to time at the awkward ecstasy-- it must look to them like featherless birds splashing in the spring puddle of a bed-- and then one woman, she is about to come, peels back the man's shut eyelids and says, look at me, and he does.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg, This post has been corrected. See the note below.
A 688-page debut novel and a nonfiction book that has already racked up a shelf of prizes, including the National Book Award, led the PEN 2013 Awards, which were announced Wednesday. Sergio de la Pava's novel, "A Naked Singularity," will be awarded the $25,000 PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for first fiction. Katherine Boo will take home $10,000 for the PEN/John Kenneth Galbraith Award for Nonfiction for her book reporting on a Mumbai slum, "Behind the Beautiful Forevers. " Two other PEN awards come with $10,000 prizes: the PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay, which will go to Robert Hass for his collection "What Light Can Do," and PEN/E.O.
Advertisement
BOOKS
April 13, 1997 | FRANCES MAYES, Frances Mayes's latest book of poetry is "Ex Voto." Chronicle Books recently published her memoir, "Under the Tuscan Sun."
The "smiling public man" W. B. Yeats saw himself become after he was appointed to the Irish senate is an unfamiliar figure among American writers. In Latin America, writers in their mature years are chosen as ambassadors or run for elected offices, while American writers' public service tends toward the classroom. Robert Hass is the most active poet laureate of the United States we've ever had and he sets a standard for those who follow.
NEWS
August 21, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg, This post has been updated. Please see the note below for details.
San Francisco's Litquake announced the schedule for its eight-day literary festival, which takes place in several venues during October, on Tuesday. Eight-hundred and forty local and international authors will be reading and talking about books. Some of the notable authors scheduled to appear are former U.S. poet laureate Robert Hass, humorist Merrill Markoe, Kenyan exile Ngugi wa Thiong'o, mystery writer Zoe Ferraris, satirist Will Self, California poet laureate Juan Felipe Herrera, writer Michelle Tea, Zyzzyva editor Oscar Villalon, poet Matthew Zapruder, fantasist Karen Joy Fowler, comedian Michael Ian Black, essayist Rebecca Solnit, underground publisher Adam Parfrey, novelist Andrew Sean Greer, poet D.A. Powell, thriller writer David Corbett, actor Chris Elliott, novelist Joshua Mohr and Salon.com founder David Talbot.
BOOKS
July 1, 2001
The fog has hovered off the coast for weeks And given us a succession of sunlit days you wouldn't recognize who've grumbled eloquently about the cool, grey summers up on Grizzly Peak. Unless they put you in mind of the puppet pageants your poems remember from Lithuanian market towns before the First World War. Here's more theater: a mule-tail doe gave birth to a pair of fawns just outside your study window one morning a few weeks ago, in the oxalis under the redwoods. I didn't see it happen.
BOOKS
March 3, 2002
Some believe the end will come in the form of a mathematical equation. Others believe it will descend as a shining horse. I calculate the probabilities to be even at fifty percent: Either a thing will happen or it won't. I open a window, I unmake the bed, Somehow, I am moving close to the equation or to the horse with everything I do. Death comes in the form of a horse covered in shining equations. There will be no further clues, I see. I begin to read my horse.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2007 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
Bay AREA poet Robert Hass resembles a West Coast cross between William Wordsworth and Wallace Stevens. Hass sees with the eyes of the English romantic but speaks in the sensuous, philosophical tones of the burgher of Hartford. And he sets his poems neither in the Lake District nor wintry New England but alongside the rugged coastline and golden landscape of Northern California. Hass' patented combination has drawn acclaim in the past -- he served, for instance, as U.S. poet laureate in the mid-'90s.
BOOKS
October 14, 2001 | Linda Gregg
No one really dies in the myths. No world is lost in the stories. Everything is lost in the retelling, in being wondered at. We grow up and grow old in our land of grass and blood moons, birth and goneness. A place of absolutes. Of returning. We live our myth in the recurrence, pretending we will return another day. Like the morning coming every morning. The truth is we come back as a choir. Otherwise Eurydice would be forever in the dark. Our singing brings her back. Our dying keeps her alive.
BOOKS
July 1, 2001 | SEAMUS HEANEY, Seamus Heaney was awarded the Nobel Prize for literature in 1995. His most recent book is "Electric Light."
There was a time when only wise books were read, helping us to bear our pain and misery. This, after all, is not quite the same as leafing through a thousand works fresh from psychiatric clinics. -- from "Ars Poetica?" As ever in Milosz, the yearning is shot through with irony; he does believe in the rightness of expecting wisdom from books, but he is too self-inculpating to allow himself a jeremiad.
NEWS
August 21, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg, This post has been updated. Please see the note below for details.
San Francisco's Litquake announced the schedule for its eight-day literary festival, which takes place in several venues during October, on Tuesday. Eight-hundred and forty local and international authors will be reading and talking about books. Some of the notable authors scheduled to appear are former U.S. poet laureate Robert Hass, humorist Merrill Markoe, Kenyan exile Ngugi wa Thiong'o, mystery writer Zoe Ferraris, satirist Will Self, California poet laureate Juan Felipe Herrera, writer Michelle Tea, Zyzzyva editor Oscar Villalon, poet Matthew Zapruder, fantasist Karen Joy Fowler, comedian Michael Ian Black, essayist Rebecca Solnit, underground publisher Adam Parfrey, novelist Andrew Sean Greer, poet D.A. Powell, thriller writer David Corbett, actor Chris Elliott, novelist Joshua Mohr and Salon.com founder David Talbot.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2011 | By Elizabeth Hoover, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Fall Higher Dean Young Copper Canyon Press: 105 pp., $22 "All the new thinking is about loss," Robert Hass begins his 1979 poem "Meditation at Lagunitas. " Structuralism had put poets in a bind by arguing that words are meaningless symbols assigned random significance by culture. "A word is elegy to what it signifies," Hass muses, insisting on making connections where theory argues there are none. In "Fall Higher," his 13th collection of poetry, Dean Young uses a different tactic: "All the new thinking / was about collision," he writes with a wink to Hass.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2007 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
Bay AREA poet Robert Hass resembles a West Coast cross between William Wordsworth and Wallace Stevens. Hass sees with the eyes of the English romantic but speaks in the sensuous, philosophical tones of the burgher of Hartford. And he sets his poems neither in the Lake District nor wintry New England but alongside the rugged coastline and golden landscape of Northern California. Hass' patented combination has drawn acclaim in the past -- he served, for instance, as U.S. poet laureate in the mid-'90s.
BOOKS
October 10, 2004 | Richard Eder, Richard Eder, former book critic for The Times, was awarded a Pulitzer Prize for criticism in 1987.
Approaching 90, Czeslaw Milosz wrote in the poem "Late Ripeness": I felt a door opening in me and I entered the clarity of early morning. One after another my former lives were departing like ships, together with their sorrows. And the countries, cities, gardens, the bays of seas assigned to my brush came closer, ready now to be described better than they were before. For years the Polish poet, who died in August at 93, had been fashioning a serenely youthful vision out of his old age.
BOOKS
March 3, 2002
Some believe the end will come in the form of a mathematical equation. Others believe it will descend as a shining horse. I calculate the probabilities to be even at fifty percent: Either a thing will happen or it won't. I open a window, I unmake the bed, Somehow, I am moving close to the equation or to the horse with everything I do. Death comes in the form of a horse covered in shining equations. There will be no further clues, I see. I begin to read my horse.
BOOKS
October 14, 2001 | Linda Gregg
No one really dies in the myths. No world is lost in the stories. Everything is lost in the retelling, in being wondered at. We grow up and grow old in our land of grass and blood moons, birth and goneness. A place of absolutes. Of returning. We live our myth in the recurrence, pretending we will return another day. Like the morning coming every morning. The truth is we come back as a choir. Otherwise Eurydice would be forever in the dark. Our singing brings her back. Our dying keeps her alive.
BOOKS
July 1, 2001 | SEAMUS HEANEY, Seamus Heaney was awarded the Nobel Prize for literature in 1995. His most recent book is "Electric Light."
There was a time when only wise books were read, helping us to bear our pain and misery. This, after all, is not quite the same as leafing through a thousand works fresh from psychiatric clinics. -- from "Ars Poetica?" As ever in Milosz, the yearning is shot through with irony; he does believe in the rightness of expecting wisdom from books, but he is too self-inculpating to allow himself a jeremiad.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2011 | By Elizabeth Hoover, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Fall Higher Dean Young Copper Canyon Press: 105 pp., $22 "All the new thinking is about loss," Robert Hass begins his 1979 poem "Meditation at Lagunitas. " Structuralism had put poets in a bind by arguing that words are meaningless symbols assigned random significance by culture. "A word is elegy to what it signifies," Hass muses, insisting on making connections where theory argues there are none. In "Fall Higher," his 13th collection of poetry, Dean Young uses a different tactic: "All the new thinking / was about collision," he writes with a wink to Hass.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg, This post has been corrected. See the note below.
A 688-page debut novel and a nonfiction book that has already racked up a shelf of prizes, including the National Book Award, led the PEN 2013 Awards, which were announced Wednesday. Sergio de la Pava's novel, "A Naked Singularity," will be awarded the $25,000 PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for first fiction. Katherine Boo will take home $10,000 for the PEN/John Kenneth Galbraith Award for Nonfiction for her book reporting on a Mumbai slum, "Behind the Beautiful Forevers. " Two other PEN awards come with $10,000 prizes: the PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay, which will go to Robert Hass for his collection "What Light Can Do," and PEN/E.O.
BOOKS
July 1, 2001
The fog has hovered off the coast for weeks And given us a succession of sunlit days you wouldn't recognize who've grumbled eloquently about the cool, grey summers up on Grizzly Peak. Unless they put you in mind of the puppet pageants your poems remember from Lithuanian market towns before the First World War. Here's more theater: a mule-tail doe gave birth to a pair of fawns just outside your study window one morning a few weeks ago, in the oxalis under the redwoods. I didn't see it happen.
BOOKS
February 14, 1999
Many are making love. Up above, the angels in the unshaken ether and crystal of human longing are braiding one another's hair, which is strawberry blond and the texture of cold rivers. They glance down from time to time at the awkward ecstasy-- it must look to them like featherless birds splashing in the spring puddle of a bed-- and then one woman, she is about to come, peels back the man's shut eyelids and says, look at me, and he does.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|