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Robert Heinecken

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 2006 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
Robert Heinecken, an artist who was instrumental in changing the way photographs are considered in the American cultural landscape, died Friday at a nursing home in Albuquerque, N.M. He was 74. Heinecken, who had relocated to New Mexico after living and working principally in Los Angeles for more than 50 years, had suffered from the effects of Alzheimer's disease since 1994, according to his wife, Joyce Neimanas.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times art critic
Artist Robert Heinecken (1931-2006) is best-known for cleverly manipulating found photographs plucked from mass media, which meant to undermine their authority in America's exploding image-culture. He's not included among the 36 artists in the historical group exhibition "Take It or Leave It" currently at the UCLA Hammer Museum, but he probably should be. A self-styled "para-photographer," Heinecken made pictures that crossed appropriation art with institutional critique, the Hammer show's theme.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2000 | HUNTER DROHOJOWSKA-PHILP, Hunter Drohojowska-Philp is a regular contributor to Calendar
Robert Heinecken founded the photography department at UCLA in 1966, but he has rarely used a camera. He employed the postmodern methods of appropriation and deconstruction decades before such terms were used to describe contemporary art. He used photographs to make sculpture, culled magazines for advertising images to use in his art, and combined Polaroids with his handwritten texts. As such, he is a "photographist," a term coined by art critic Arthur C.
MAGAZINE
August 6, 2006 | Colin Westerbeck
A memorial service for Robert Heinecken will be held Aug. 12 from 10 a.m. to noon in UCLA's Kerckhoff Hall. * Robert Heinecken could never decide what to call himself. Settling first on "paraphotographer," he later opted for "photographist." Really, though, he was a premature postmodernist. That movement, coming into its own during the '80s in the work of Richard Prince and others, appropriated images from mass media as its subject matter. But Heinecken was already doing that 20 years earlier.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2000
I am intrigued by artist Robert Heinecken's use of others' creativity (i.e. advertising images) to produce his "photographist" montages ("The Photo, Redeveloped," by Hunter Drohojowska-Philp, Feb. 13). Doesn't that make him a plagiarist, or at the least in violation of trademark and copyright laws? JOSEPH DENKER Studio City
MAGAZINE
August 6, 2006 | Colin Westerbeck
A memorial service for Robert Heinecken will be held Aug. 12 from 10 a.m. to noon in UCLA's Kerckhoff Hall. * Robert Heinecken could never decide what to call himself. Settling first on "paraphotographer," he later opted for "photographist." Really, though, he was a premature postmodernist. That movement, coming into its own during the '80s in the work of Richard Prince and others, appropriated images from mass media as its subject matter. But Heinecken was already doing that 20 years earlier.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2000
* Art. "Stiffs," right, the new light-and-sound installation Jennifer Steinkamp made in collaboration with sound engineer Jimmy Johnson, closes Sunday at Williamson Gallery, Art Center College of Design, 1700 Lida St., Pasadena. Today-Sunday, noon-5 p.m.; Saturday, noon-9 p.m. (626) 396-2397. * Museums. Two shows will exit LACMA this week as "Mastery & Elegance: Two Centuries of French Drawings From the Collection of Jeffrey E.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1987 | COLIN GARDNER
Robert Heinecken rightly calls himself a "Paraphotographer." Although he manipulates mechanically reproduced imagery, he rarely uses a camera, preferring to synthesize existing material with a computer or video monitor. His current exhibit presents three separate bodies of work, dealing largely with media manipulation of women's images. A recurring theme in Heinecken's work since the '60s, it seems all the more pertinent in this era of MTV alienation and subliminal seduction.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2000 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
In 1978 Robert Heinecken made two large portraits of Susan Sontag, the New York intellectual whose new book "On Photography" was causing a stir in literary and artistic circles. The pair of black-and-white portraits hangs near the entrance to the 35-year retrospective of Heinecken's work, now at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and they throw down an inescapable gauntlet.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 1993 | BARBARA ISENBERG, Barbara Isenberg is a Times staff writer
On two Sunday afternoons each year, photographer Edmund Teske would open his studio to his students and models, their families and friends. Beer and wine flowed freely, the place was packed, and for $35 or less, you could walk away with one of Teske's photographs. Sometimes the images would be traditional, sometimes far more mysterious. You never knew what you were getting, since Teske would hide each print in tissue. And it could be a long, long wait before the artist would finish reciting his poetry and telling stories and get around to the photographs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 2006 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
Robert Heinecken, an artist who was instrumental in changing the way photographs are considered in the American cultural landscape, died Friday at a nursing home in Albuquerque, N.M. He was 74. Heinecken, who had relocated to New Mexico after living and working principally in Los Angeles for more than 50 years, had suffered from the effects of Alzheimer's disease since 1994, according to his wife, Joyce Neimanas.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2000
* Art. "Stiffs," right, the new light-and-sound installation Jennifer Steinkamp made in collaboration with sound engineer Jimmy Johnson, closes Sunday at Williamson Gallery, Art Center College of Design, 1700 Lida St., Pasadena. Today-Sunday, noon-5 p.m.; Saturday, noon-9 p.m. (626) 396-2397. * Museums. Two shows will exit LACMA this week as "Mastery & Elegance: Two Centuries of French Drawings From the Collection of Jeffrey E.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2000
I am intrigued by artist Robert Heinecken's use of others' creativity (i.e. advertising images) to produce his "photographist" montages ("The Photo, Redeveloped," by Hunter Drohojowska-Philp, Feb. 13). Doesn't that make him a plagiarist, or at the least in violation of trademark and copyright laws? JOSEPH DENKER Studio City
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2000 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
In 1978 Robert Heinecken made two large portraits of Susan Sontag, the New York intellectual whose new book "On Photography" was causing a stir in literary and artistic circles. The pair of black-and-white portraits hangs near the entrance to the 35-year retrospective of Heinecken's work, now at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and they throw down an inescapable gauntlet.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2000 | HUNTER DROHOJOWSKA-PHILP, Hunter Drohojowska-Philp is a regular contributor to Calendar
Robert Heinecken founded the photography department at UCLA in 1966, but he has rarely used a camera. He employed the postmodern methods of appropriation and deconstruction decades before such terms were used to describe contemporary art. He used photographs to make sculpture, culled magazines for advertising images to use in his art, and combined Polaroids with his handwritten texts. As such, he is a "photographist," a term coined by art critic Arthur C.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 1993 | BARBARA ISENBERG, Barbara Isenberg is a Times staff writer
On two Sunday afternoons each year, photographer Edmund Teske would open his studio to his students and models, their families and friends. Beer and wine flowed freely, the place was packed, and for $35 or less, you could walk away with one of Teske's photographs. Sometimes the images would be traditional, sometimes far more mysterious. You never knew what you were getting, since Teske would hide each print in tissue. And it could be a long, long wait before the artist would finish reciting his poetry and telling stories and get around to the photographs.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times art critic
Artist Robert Heinecken (1931-2006) is best-known for cleverly manipulating found photographs plucked from mass media, which meant to undermine their authority in America's exploding image-culture. He's not included among the 36 artists in the historical group exhibition "Take It or Leave It" currently at the UCLA Hammer Museum, but he probably should be. A self-styled "para-photographer," Heinecken made pictures that crossed appropriation art with institutional critique, the Hammer show's theme.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2013 | By Jori Finkel
The brain drain continues: Rebecca Morse is leaving her job as associate curator at MOCA for a post with the same title within LACMA's photography department. She will start her new position on Feb. 1, replacing Edward Robinson and reporting to photography head Britt Salvesen. Her departure leaves only two curators at MOCA (Alma Ruiz and Bennett Simpson), down from a high of seven curators in early 2009. That year the museum implemented various cost-cutting measures and layoffs, following a financial crisis and bailout by trustee Eli Broad.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1987 | COLIN GARDNER
Robert Heinecken rightly calls himself a "Paraphotographer." Although he manipulates mechanically reproduced imagery, he rarely uses a camera, preferring to synthesize existing material with a computer or video monitor. His current exhibit presents three separate bodies of work, dealing largely with media manipulation of women's images. A recurring theme in Heinecken's work since the '60s, it seems all the more pertinent in this era of MTV alienation and subliminal seduction.
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