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BUSINESS
November 9, 1994 | From Reuters
On the eve of launching a $100-million advertising campaign, Microsoft Corp. on Tuesday lured a top executive from consumer products firm Procter & Gamble Co. to become chief operating officer. Robert Herbold, 52, a senior vice president at P&G who has been in the forefront of the advertising industry's movement to interactive television, will join Microsoft's three-member Office of the President with a mandate to help develop corporate strategy.
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BUSINESS
November 9, 1994 | From Reuters
On the eve of launching a $100-million advertising campaign, Microsoft Corp. on Tuesday lured a top executive from consumer products firm Procter & Gamble Co. to become chief operating officer. Robert Herbold, 52, a senior vice president at P&G who has been in the forefront of the advertising industry's movement to interactive television, will join Microsoft's three-member Office of the President with a mandate to help develop corporate strategy.
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BUSINESS
June 17, 2000 | Reuters
Executives at Microsoft Corp., including co-founder Paul Allen, filed to sell millions of shares of the software giant in the days leading up to a judge's ruling ordering the company split. Allen sold 35.6 million common shares worth more than $3 billion from March 1 to June 5, according to filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. He filed to sell an additional 2 million shares worth more than $138 million on June 6, the day before U.S.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1999 | From Reuters
Highlighting mounting concern about privacy in online shopping, Microsoft Corp. on Wednesday warned that it will yank its advertising from sites that fail to state their policy on consumer privacy. In a speech at the PC Expo trade show in New York City, Robert Herbold, Microsoft's chief operating officer, said that as of Jan. 1, 2000, Redmond, Wash.-based Microsoft, the No. 1 online advertiser, will buy advertising space only on Web sites that have posted comprehensive privacy policies.
BUSINESS
May 15, 1995 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A key Microsoft Inc. executive in the management tier just below the software giant's chairman and co-founder, Bill Gates, is expected to announce today that he will retire, a computer industry trade publication reported. Mike Maples, 52, an executive vice president and member of the three-person office of the president, is expected to stay on long enough at Microsoft to help break in a successor or successors, according to Computer Reseller News in an article for publication today.
BUSINESS
February 15, 2001 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Justice Department is investigating Microsoft Corp.'s $135-million investment in Canadian rival Corel Corp., raising a new antitrust issue for the beleaguered software giant. The Justice Department is examining whether Microsoft's stake in Corel could thwart competition in key business software products--such as text editors and spreadsheets--that Microsoft dominates with a market share of more than 90%.
BUSINESS
September 26, 1995 | From Associated Press
Bill Gates. World's richest guy? Maybe so, but he isn't Microsoft Corp.'s top wage earner, according to company records released Monday. That honor went to Robert J. Herbold, Microsoft's new executive vice president and chief operating officer, who pulled down $740,133 in salary and bonuses last year. That's more than the $415,580 in annual salary and bonus for Gates, according to Microsoft's annual proxy statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.
BUSINESS
May 16, 1995 | JULIE PITTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I'm having my first grandkid in July," said Michael Maples, Microsoft Corp.'s executive vice president. "Microsoft is no place for a grandfather." Thus the popular 52-year-old Maples on Monday announced his retirement from the software giant, as expected, saying he is ready to do other things with his life.
BUSINESS
June 28, 1999 | JOSEPH MENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Random notes from last week's PC Expo trade show here, one of the year's biggest bashes for the wired industry: Teaching Aid: Teaching assistant Yonald Chery saw his students taking lousy notes. If he'd been an instructor at a military academy, maybe he would have yelled at them. But because he was at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, he decided to turn his own notes into everyone else's--in real time.
BUSINESS
March 10, 1987 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
The 15-second beer is here. That's not how long you drink it. It's how long you think it. But starting next month, Miller Brewing Co. and its ad agency Backer & Spielvogel will try to pack more punch into some 15-second commercials by turning them into parts of a continuing series. In the past, the short time frame has forced most advertisers to use 15-second spots purely for product name identification.
BUSINESS
August 26, 1995 | DENISE GELLENE and LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
He's nerdy-looking, awkward, often unshaven and has been known to spray you when he talks. Hardly the kind of guy you'd choose to do lunch with. Except his name is Bill Gates. And in spite of his quirks, or perhaps because of them, the youthful chairman of mighty Microsoft Corp. has become the stuff of corporate legend, a cultural figure so closely watched that his 1987 breakup with a girlfriend was emblazoned across the supermarket tabloid the Star.
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