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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1989 | CAROL McGRAW, Times Staff Writer
In the end, like Adam and Eve, school principal Dennis Duylea lost out because of a snake. The beleaguered principal of Robert Hill Lane Elementary School, who has been at the center of a controversy over his administrative practices and alleged acts of racism, has been transferred to another school. But even as he starts his new job as principal of 15th Street Elementary School in San Pedro, parents who support him are planning to petition the school board to have him reinstated at Lane.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1989 | CAROL McGRAW, Times Staff Writer
In the end, like Adam and Eve, school principal Dennis Duylea lost out because of a snake. The beleaguered principal of Robert Hill Lane Elementary School, who has been at the center of a controversy over his administrative practices and alleged acts of racism, has been transferred to another school. But even as he starts his new job as principal of 15th Street Elementary School in San Pedro, parents who support him are planning to petition the school board to have him reinstated at Lane.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
A 19-year-old Santa Monica College student who allegedly threatened to “shoot up” a local school Thursday turned himself in to psychological services, where police arrested him, authorities said. The student, who authorities did not immediately identify, was arrested  about 9:30 a.m. Thursday after police used his phone number to confirm that he was the person who called 911 hours earlier, said Santa Monica College Police Chief Albert Vasquez. Police said the man was near East Los Angeles College when he called the California Highway Patrol sometime before 8 a.m. saying he had a gun and was going to shoot up a school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2000 | BOBBY CUZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Norwood Street Elementary School is in many ways a typical inner-city school facing typical inner-city problems: high poverty, low parental education levels and students who speak little or no English. Most parents are immigrants from Mexico, El Salvador and Guatemala. Ninety-seven percent of students qualify for free and reduced lunches. What's extraordinary is the measures the school has taken to help students overcome their obstacles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2013 | By Rosanna Xia and Joseph Serna, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
Eunice Rivas was riding the bus to class at East Los Angeles College on Thursday when she received a frantic call from her mother. The news was swamped with reports of a gunman threatening her school or others in Monterey Park. Rivas' nieces and nephews go to a school in the Alhambra school district, where some campuses had been placed on lockdown because of the threat. Police said they found the caller across town, in class at Santa Monica College. The caller, described as a 19-year-old male, was detained for questioning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2001 | DAVID KLEIN, David Klein (david.klein@csun.edu) is a professor of mathematics at Cal State Northridge
Schools with low-income students tend to have low test scores. Low academic achievement, especially in mathematics, is often one of the consequences of poverty. Nevertheless, some schools beat the odds. Bennett-Kew Elementary School in Inglewood is an example. At Bennett-Kew 51% of the students are African American, 48% are Latino, 29% are not fluent in English and 77% of all students qualify for free or reduced-price lunch, a standard measure of poverty in schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2006 | Garrett Therolf, Times Staff Writer
A prominent educational psychologist who provided counseling to students in Los Angeles Unified schools was suspended by the district Friday after a woman alleged that he molested her son more than a hundred times two decades ago in Colorado. An attorney for psychologist Peter J. Ruthenbeck said last month that his client was cooperating with an investigation by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences, which licenses educational psychologists, but declined to comment on the allegations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1987 | IRIS SCHNEIDER, Times Staff Writer
Thirteen-year-old Anibal knows a lot about grown-up things, but it wasn't until the other day that he finally discovered ice cream. Anibal's days have been full of discoveries since he arrived in Los Angeles two weeks ago from his native El Salvador. There was the Halloween party, the pizza, the ring of the telephone ("Where does the conversation come from?" he wondered).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1987 | IRIS SCHNEIDER, Times Staff Writer
Thirteen-year-old Anibal knows a lot about grown-up things, but it wasn't until the other day that he finally discovered ice cream. Anibal's days have been full of discoveries since he arrived in Los Angeles recently from his native El Salvador. There was the Halloween party, the pizza, the ring of the telephone ("Where does the conversation come from?" he wondered).
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