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Robert Hofstadter

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November 20, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Robert Hofstadter, who won the Nobel Prize in physics in 1961 for his research into the nuclear particles that are the building blocks of the universe, has died at his home on the Stanford University campus, it was learned Monday. Hofstadter, who said his most important discovery was made outside the public spotlight, was 75 when he died Saturday of heart failure at the university where he had worked since 1950.
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NEWS
November 20, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Robert Hofstadter, who won the Nobel Prize in physics in 1961 for his research into the nuclear particles that are the building blocks of the universe, has died at his home on the Stanford University campus, it was learned Monday. Hofstadter, who said his most important discovery was made outside the public spotlight, was 75 when he died Saturday of heart failure at the university where he had worked since 1950.
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NEWS
March 15, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
President Reagan got some unexpected advice from a California engineer who was one of 26 scientists honored in Washington this week with the nation's highest awards for achievements in science and technology.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 2007 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Wolfgang "Pief" Panofsky, the nuclear physicist and brilliant administrator who was the driving force for the creation of Stanford University's 2-mile-long linear electron accelerator, made crucial discoveries about the nature of the neutral pi meson, advised three presidents about science and was a powerful proponent of nuclear arms control, died of a heart attack Monday at his home in Los Altos, Calif. He was 88.
MAGAZINE
December 2, 2001
On the 100th anniversary of the Nobel Prize, the government of Sweden and more than a dozen California educational institutions remind us that a disproportionate number of laureates have ties to the state--ties, it must be admitted, that in some cases seem comparable to an innkeeper's boast that George Washington slept there. So be it. The Golden State is nothing if not inclusive.
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