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Robert Hughes

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2011 | By Suzanne Muchnic
Robert Hughes wastes no time luring readers into his love affair with Rome. After tracking the infatuation to his youth in Australia, he's off and running in the Eternal City. At his favorite piazza, the Campo Dei Fiori, he expounds upon its bronze statue of Giordano Bruno, a Renaissance hero burned alive as a heretic, then quickly moves on to glorify fountains, analyze an equestrian sculpture of emperor Marcus Aurelius and offer tips on cooking fried salt cod and Jewish-style artichokes.
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NEWS
August 6, 2012 | By Jori Finkel
Robert Hughes, a giant of 20th-century art criticism who first became known in the U.S. through his reviews for Time magazine, has died at age 74. The Australian writer was famous for writing big books on big subjects -- from the early history of Australia ("The Fatal Shore" of 1987) to the pioneers of modern art ("The Shock of the New" of 1981).  Both books were bestsellers for his publisher Random House, which confirmed that Hughes died Monday in New York after a long illness.
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NEWS
May 10, 1992 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 22 years, Robert Hughes has been dishing out praise and punishment from his platform as art critic for Time magazine. Marvelously witty, acerbic and shrewd, Hughes has won a hearty following with his astute lampooning and delightful knack for turning a phrase. The Australian-born writer has also published several award-winning books, including a highly acclaimed history of his homeland, "The Fatal Shore."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2011 | By Suzanne Muchnic
Robert Hughes wastes no time luring readers into his love affair with Rome. After tracking the infatuation to his youth in Australia, he's off and running in the Eternal City. At his favorite piazza, the Campo Dei Fiori, he expounds upon its bronze statue of Giordano Bruno, a Renaissance hero burned alive as a heretic, then quickly moves on to glorify fountains, analyze an equestrian sculpture of emperor Marcus Aurelius and offer tips on cooking fried salt cod and Jewish-style artichokes.
BOOKS
May 10, 1992 | CHARLES SOLOMON
Although Hughes writes eloquently about the Old Masters in this collection of articles, his most striking essays describe the '80s art scene and the grisly spectacle of art being reduced to just one more commodity that can be bought and sold by the nouveaux riches. Hughes maintains that the real break in 20th-Century art came not with Cubism or Abstract Expressionism, but with the arrival of the post-Warhol generation of artists who never really learned how to draw.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1985
Robert Hughes, a former Thousand Oaks teacher who has been twice convicted of murdering his wife in Delaware in 1976, will ask Wednesday to be released on bail. Hughes is in prison in Delaware. Both of his convictions have been overturned by the Delaware Supreme Court, the last in February. Hughes has received more than $500,000 in support from fellow Lutherans and others around the nation since his arrest in 1979.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1987 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON
This is Calendar's third annual listing of Taste Makers, individuals who have brought a distinct focus to 1987 and who we feel will continue to influence the world of arts and entertainment long after this year passes. They were selected not so much for specific contributions in their respective fields but because they are clearly creative forces who move and shape taste. They were interviewed to find out what kinds of influences have moved and shaped them.
BOOKS
February 23, 1992 | Jan Morris, Morris' next book, on Sydney, Australia, will be published by Random House in August
In any other year one might wonder why this long, flawed but truly majestic book should have been launched upon a mass American market. Why Barcelona? It is certainly not, as the book's blurb suggests, "one of Europe's most powerful and least-known cities." Nor would many people call it "entrancing"--about the last adjective I myself would use for a tough port city that suffered 13,000 traffic casualties in a single recent year.
BOOKS
October 1, 2006 | Richard Eder, Richard Eder, former book critic of The Times, was awarded a Pulitzer Prize for criticism in 1987.
SOME memoirs convey the past, others struggle with it, and sometimes against it. Some evoke, others judge. That is grossly simplistic, of course, since no memoir could possibly do entirely one or the other. "Things I Didn't Know" by Robert Hughes tends to fall into the struggle-and-judge category.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2003 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
"Sometimes you are just scared of writing about the objects in your deepest affection," said Robert Hughes, reflecting on the 50-year artistic love affair that finally produced his latest book, on Spanish painter Francisco Jose de Goya y Lucientes. "I had a crisis in confidence in my abilities as a writer. I thought I probably wasn't good enough to carry this one off, to really handle him, to do justice to him. If you do a book about Goya and you screw it up, you can hear him laughing."
SPORTS
October 4, 2009 | Associated Press
Robert Hughes scored on a one-yard run in overtime, safeties Harrison Smith and Kyle McCarthy jarred the ball loose from Washington receiver D'Andre Goodwin near the goal line on fourth and 19, and Notre Dame defeated Washington, 37-30, Saturday. It was the fourth consecutive game decided in the last 60 seconds for the Fighting Irish, the last three of which were victories. The Irish (4-1) stayed in it with two goal-line stands in the second half. The first was late in the third quarter when the Irish stopped the Huskies (2-3)
BOOKS
October 1, 2006 | Richard Eder, Richard Eder, former book critic of The Times, was awarded a Pulitzer Prize for criticism in 1987.
SOME memoirs convey the past, others struggle with it, and sometimes against it. Some evoke, others judge. That is grossly simplistic, of course, since no memoir could possibly do entirely one or the other. "Things I Didn't Know" by Robert Hughes tends to fall into the struggle-and-judge category.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2005 | Matt Lait and Scott Glover, Times Staff Writers
Robert Hughes was a Vietnam veteran with a long criminal record and a history of heroin addiction. He was also the prosecution's star witness at the trial of Bruce Lisker, a San Fernando Valley teenager accused of beating and stabbing his mother to death. Hughes told the jury in the fall of 1985 that Lisker had been in the cell next to his at the Los Angeles County Jail, and that the two had spoken through a 4-inch hole in the wall.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2003 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
"Sometimes you are just scared of writing about the objects in your deepest affection," said Robert Hughes, reflecting on the 50-year artistic love affair that finally produced his latest book, on Spanish painter Francisco Jose de Goya y Lucientes. "I had a crisis in confidence in my abilities as a writer. I thought I probably wasn't good enough to carry this one off, to really handle him, to do justice to him. If you do a book about Goya and you screw it up, you can hear him laughing."
BOOKS
November 9, 2003 | Michael Bracewell, Michael Bracewell is an author of such works as "England Is Mine: Pop Life in Albion From Wilde to Goldie" and "When Surface Was Depth."
Spanish artist Francisco Jose de Goya y Lucientes, born in 1746, is one of the supreme anatomists of human struggle, daily event and indiscriminate suffering. As concerned with the eloquence of detail -- a dropped shoe, a bottle of wine, a sidelong glance -- as he is with the deepest psychology of horror, madness and the supernatural, he is in many ways the ultimate realist.
TRAVEL
November 24, 2002 | Christopher Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
Here come the holidays, and with them the season's usual bounty from the publishing industry: coffee-table books. Here are four new travel-related volumes that might make worthy gifts. "Planet Earth" is a book that strikes you between the eyes. Its lures are many, from the richness of the colors in these pictures taken from space to the thrill of spotting a familiar continental profile.
NEWS
April 15, 1993 | RICHARD EDER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
To the debate over culture and the university waged between our intellectual Left and Right, what does Robert Hughes have to contribute? Exuberance in a deadly dry season, a sane wit and a splash of polychrome in a battle usually fought under the whited colors of its sepulchral extremes. And, finally, an unhesitating pleasure in making points for and against both sides. Should the Western classics, the dead-white-male stuff, be universally taught in our schools and colleges?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2000 | HARRIET WINSLOW, WASHINGTON POST
Time magazine art critic Robert Hughes nearly died in a head-on collision last May. He was on a fishing trip in his native Australia and had started filming a documentary on how the nation had evolved in the more than 30 years since he'd moved away. The accident changed everything. Hughes' film was supposed to be a historical treatise on how Australia has evolved since the 18th century, when it was a British penal colony. But it became much more personal.
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