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Robert Irsay

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January 15, 1997 | From Associated Press
Robert Irsay, who in 1984 sneaked the Colts out of Baltimore in the middle of the night to Indianapolis, died today, more than a year after suffering a stroke. He was 73. Irsay, owner of the Indianapolis Colts, died at Indiana University Medical Center. He had been in and out of hospitals since suffering the stroke Nov. 29, 1995.
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SPORTS
November 22, 2009 | By sam farmer
Years before his Indianapolis Colts established themselves among the elite NFL teams, owner Jim Irsay engaged in his own brand of fantasy football. It was 1997, and Irsay's team was in the midst of its first of consecutive 3-13 seasons. Trying to drum up support for them -- not the easiest thing to do in a basketball state -- he barnstormed around Indiana and spoke to dispirited fans far and near. Irsay talked about his vision for a "golden age" of the franchise, about the possibility of Peyton Manning, then a star quarterback at Tennessee, leading the way. That was a prescient forecast, as the Colts would make Manning the No. 1 overall pick the following spring.
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SPORTS
January 13, 2007 | Bill Dwyre
Friday was Purple Day at the Woodbrook Early Education Center. Children age 2 to 5 came dressed in the color of Baltimore's pro football team, the Ravens, who have an NFL playoff game here today against the Indianapolis Colts. One of the teachers at Woodbrook, Chris Bollinger, said, "We don't say the Ravens are playing the Colts. We say they are playing Indianapolis." Bollinger is a mother of four and a grandmother of four.
SPORTS
November 20, 1990 | Associated Press
Indianapolis Colt owner Robert Irsay apologized for referring to a television analyst as a "little Jewish boy." ESPN's Fred Edelstein reported that Colt Coach Ron Meyer would be fired at the end of the season and replaced by Raider assistant Mike White. Asked to comment on the report, Irsay said, "Edelstein's a little Jewish boy and he doesn't know what he's talking about."
SPORTS
March 31, 1985 | United Press International
General Manager Jim Irsay's most vivid memory of the first year in the history of the Indianapolis Colts was the moment the moving trucks arrived to take the team from Baltimore. "Probably the most unbelievable moment--it brought chills to my spine--was in the chill of the night, the fog in the distance, in the dark," Irsay said. "Probably the most striking memory is that first truck pulling up. I remember thinking, 'My God, all of Maryland can hear these things pull up.'
SPORTS
September 16, 1989 | JOHN STEADMAN, Baltimore Evening Sun
That anyone would, as alleged, threaten the life of Robert Irsay because, according to him, he won't give the name "Colts" back to Baltimore--where it rightfully belongs--defies believability. Then Irsay, via the course of conversation, brings the FBI into the proceedings, except for one extremely vital detail. The Bureau doesn't know anything about it.
SPORTS
November 30, 1995 | Associated Press
Indianapolis Colt owner Robert Irsay was taken to a hospital emergency room Wednesday night in Indianapolis. St. Vincent's Hospital spokeswoman Tenna Boone refused to say why Irsay, 72, was there. WTHR-TV in Indianapolis reported he possibly had suffered a stroke. The station also quoted unidentified hospital sources as saying Irsay was conscious. Colt spokesman Craig Kelley said he had no information on Irsay's condition or why he was hospitalized.
SPORTS
October 19, 1986 | Associated Press
The Baltimore Colts Marching Band refuses to disband, even though its team belongs to another city. They still strike up the Colts' fight song, and last Sunday the 160-member troupe entertained the crowd at the NFL game between the Kansas City Chiefs and the Browns at Cleveland. "They're coming on one condition," Browns' General Manager Ernie Accorsi said before the appearance. "I told them they have to play the song, 'Let's Go, You Baltimore Colts', and not the 'Ohio State Buckeye Battle Cry.'
SPORTS
November 22, 2009 | By sam farmer
Years before his Indianapolis Colts established themselves among the elite NFL teams, owner Jim Irsay engaged in his own brand of fantasy football. It was 1997, and Irsay's team was in the midst of its first of consecutive 3-13 seasons. Trying to drum up support for them -- not the easiest thing to do in a basketball state -- he barnstormed around Indiana and spoke to dispirited fans far and near. Irsay talked about his vision for a "golden age" of the franchise, about the possibility of Peyton Manning, then a star quarterback at Tennessee, leading the way. That was a prescient forecast, as the Colts would make Manning the No. 1 overall pick the following spring.
SPORTS
June 24, 2001 | ROSS NEWHAN
What we have is the image of Robert Irsay at the head of a battalion of moving vans sweeping into Baltimore under the cover of darkness to relocate his Colts to Indianapolis. OK, baseball isn't being quite as clandestine. Industry executives aren't talking about a night operation.
SPORTS
January 15, 1997 | From Associated Press
Robert Irsay, who in 1984 sneaked the Colts out of Baltimore in the middle of the night to Indianapolis, died today, more than a year after suffering a stroke. He was 73. Irsay, owner of the Indianapolis Colts, died at Indiana University Medical Center. He had been in and out of hospitals since suffering the stroke Nov. 29, 1995.
SPORTS
November 30, 1995 | Associated Press
Indianapolis Colt owner Robert Irsay was taken to a hospital emergency room Wednesday night in Indianapolis. St. Vincent's Hospital spokeswoman Tenna Boone refused to say why Irsay, 72, was there. WTHR-TV in Indianapolis reported he possibly had suffered a stroke. The station also quoted unidentified hospital sources as saying Irsay was conscious. Colt spokesman Craig Kelley said he had no information on Irsay's condition or why he was hospitalized.
NEWS
January 19, 1992 | STEVE HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bumbling teams--such as the Los Angeles Lambs (3-13) and the Ruins of Troy (3-8)--weren't the only sources of humor in 1991. Television and radio coverage also yielded numerous odd moments and unintentional laughs.
SPORTS
December 22, 1990 | Associated Press
Indianapolis Colt owner Robert Irsay said that Coach Ron Meyer will return for the 1991 season, the last year of his contract, but other changes in the coaching staff will be made. "Ron has done a good job of coaching, so we just have to fix up some damages we have at the other end," Irsay told the Indianapolis News. Irsay said he wouldn't know until after Jan. 1 specifically what the changes would be, but say they would not be "massive."
SPORTS
September 16, 1989 | JOHN STEADMAN, Baltimore Evening Sun
That anyone would, as alleged, threaten the life of Robert Irsay because, according to him, he won't give the name "Colts" back to Baltimore--where it rightfully belongs--defies believability. Then Irsay, via the course of conversation, brings the FBI into the proceedings, except for one extremely vital detail. The Bureau doesn't know anything about it.
SPORTS
June 24, 2001 | ROSS NEWHAN
What we have is the image of Robert Irsay at the head of a battalion of moving vans sweeping into Baltimore under the cover of darkness to relocate his Colts to Indianapolis. OK, baseball isn't being quite as clandestine. Industry executives aren't talking about a night operation.
SPORTS
June 21, 1987 | GARY POMERANTZ, Washington Post
The marriage is off. --EDDIE SIMMONS, in the movie "Diner," after his fiancee failed to pass a 1959 quiz on his local passion, the Baltimore Colts. It's been more than three years since the Midnight Ride of Robert Irsay. That pack-'em-up-and-move-'em-out expedition put the Colts in Indianapolis and put Baltimore in such a state of shock you half expected the reverberations to make the rowhouses tumble like dominoes.
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