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Robert Irwin

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2010
Robert Irwin installation Where: Quint Contemporary Art, 7739 Drury Lane, La Jolla When: Through May 1 Contact: (858) 454-3409; www.quintgallery.com
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
"Everything Loose Will Land" has landed. And its timing could hardly be better. The exhibition at the MAK Center in West Hollywood, curated by UCLA architectural historian and critic Sylvia Lavin, is a wry study of the ways Los Angeles artists and architects worked with, leaned on, stole from and influenced one another in the 1970s. In a larger sense, it charts the way Southern California architects threw off the influence of establishmen Modernism and helped remake the profession in that decade.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2010 | By Leah Ollman
No one seems more tickled than Robert Irwin himself by where the artist, at 81, has landed. "It's fairly humorous," he says with a smile. Whatever the unsavory circumstances, "I come up smelling like a rose. I like what I'm doing." In his customary jeans and baseball cap, he sits among his newly installed work at Quint Contemporary Art in La Jolla, not exactly smug but clearly satisfied. This is his first commercial gallery show in California in 30 years, the result of several significant shifts in his working process.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2010
Robert Irwin installation Where: Quint Contemporary Art, 7739 Drury Lane, La Jolla When: Through May 1 Contact: (858) 454-3409; www.quintgallery.com
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2007 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
Lots of artists extend established traditions in their work, adding to what came before. Some artists overturn them. A few begin new ones, starting from scratch. Then there's the rarest artist of all -- the one who manages to extend, overturn and radically innovate simultaneously. These are artists who set the culture on its ear. Their art conjures previously unsuspected possibilities, energizing other artists by changing art's terms. Robert Irwin is such an artist.
MAGAZINE
January 6, 2008 | Susan Heeger, Susan Heeger is a staff writer for Martha Stewart Living. Contact her at magazine@latimes.com.
Forget what you know about the palm, that topknot-on-a-pole that punctuates much of Los Angeles. Come Feb. 16, when the Renzo Piano-designed Broad Contemporary Art Museum opens at LACMA, you're going to be reacquainted with the tree. Your impressions will never be the same. Over the last year, artist Robert Irwin and landscape architect Paul Comstock have been "curating" a collection of palms that will function as a living LACMA display--an ever-changing exhibition of botanical sculpture that introduces Piano's addition and links the elements of the museum's campus.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2007 | Leah Ollman, Special to The Times
DASHES of white light flicked on one by one as the installation crew at the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego worked its way across an expansive wall, mounting custom-built fluorescent fixtures in a syncopated, fragmented diagonal grid. On the eve of the museum's Robert Irwin exhibition, the largest since MoCA's retrospective in 1993, the 79-year-old artist, in trademark baseball cap and jeans, paced the space with barely tempered eagerness. A birth was imminent.
HOME & GARDEN
July 24, 2008 | Paula Panich, Special to The Times
ARTIST Robert Irwin, designer of the Central Garden at the Getty Center, sits on a small curved bench in the dappled shade of London plane trees he chose. In the 10 years since the garden opened, the trees haven't quite created the canopy Irwin envisioned, but they will -- just without him around.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1996 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a regular contributor to Calendar
At the beginning of the 20th century, nature was so much everywhere, one couldn't pinpoint it as existing anywhere in particular. As the century crawls to a close, however, things have changed dramatically. Nature's displays of power still have the last word--any Californian can attest to that--but in the short run, man has reduced the natural environment to something we preserve when we care to, destroy when we don't.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1991 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Robert Irwin is widely regarded as the theoretical godfather of California Light and Space art, arguably Los Angeles' most original contribution to the lexicon of contemporary styles. No conversation ranking local artists gets very far before Irwin is nominated for the imaginary "most important artist of his generation" award. He's already received the real and much-coveted MacArthur fellowship, the so-called genius grant.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2010 | By Leah Ollman
No one seems more tickled than Robert Irwin himself by where the artist, at 81, has landed. "It's fairly humorous," he says with a smile. Whatever the unsavory circumstances, "I come up smelling like a rose. I like what I'm doing." In his customary jeans and baseball cap, he sits among his newly installed work at Quint Contemporary Art in La Jolla, not exactly smug but clearly satisfied. This is his first commercial gallery show in California in 30 years, the result of several significant shifts in his working process.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2009 | David L. Ulin
Here's how Lawrence Weschler sees it: "The world as it is," he writes in his 2004 collection of essays and reportage, "Vermeer in Bosnia," "is overdetermined: the web of all those interrelationships is dense to the point of saturation. . . . If I were somehow to be forced to write a fiction about, say, a make-believe Caribbean island, I wouldn't know where to put it, because the Caribbean as it is is already full -- there's no room in it for any fictional islands.
HOME & GARDEN
July 24, 2008 | Paula Panich, Special to The Times
ARTIST Robert Irwin, designer of the Central Garden at the Getty Center, sits on a small curved bench in the dappled shade of London plane trees he chose. In the 10 years since the garden opened, the trees haven't quite created the canopy Irwin envisioned, but they will -- just without him around.
REAL ESTATE
February 17, 2008 | Frank Nelson, Special to The Times
IF you've written more than 60 books on real estate investing, as Robert Irwin has, the question must be asked: Is there really anything new left to say on the subject? The answer, judging by "The Armchair Real Estate Investor," the latest book from this prolific author, investor, landlord, broker and consultant, is yes . . . and no.
MAGAZINE
January 6, 2008 | Susan Heeger, Susan Heeger is a staff writer for Martha Stewart Living. Contact her at magazine@latimes.com.
Forget what you know about the palm, that topknot-on-a-pole that punctuates much of Los Angeles. Come Feb. 16, when the Renzo Piano-designed Broad Contemporary Art Museum opens at LACMA, you're going to be reacquainted with the tree. Your impressions will never be the same. Over the last year, artist Robert Irwin and landscape architect Paul Comstock have been "curating" a collection of palms that will function as a living LACMA display--an ever-changing exhibition of botanical sculpture that introduces Piano's addition and links the elements of the museum's campus.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2007 | Leah Ollman, Special to The Times
DASHES of white light flicked on one by one as the installation crew at the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego worked its way across an expansive wall, mounting custom-built fluorescent fixtures in a syncopated, fragmented diagonal grid. On the eve of the museum's Robert Irwin exhibition, the largest since MoCA's retrospective in 1993, the 79-year-old artist, in trademark baseball cap and jeans, paced the space with barely tempered eagerness. A birth was imminent.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1993 | KRISTINE McKENNA, Kristine McKenna is a frequent contributor to Calendar.
The full arc of artist Robert Irwin's career is something to behold. Irwin started out in the '50s painting landscapes, then, says Walter Hopps--the dealer often credited with "discovering" him--"he used painting as a springboard into a vision as broad as the Earth itself." As will be seen in the retrospective of Irwin's work opening next Sunday at the Museum of Contemporary Art, the distance he's covered over the course of his 35-year career is vast, indeed.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2007 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
Lots of artists extend established traditions in their work, adding to what came before. Some artists overturn them. A few begin new ones, starting from scratch. Then there's the rarest artist of all -- the one who manages to extend, overturn and radically innovate simultaneously. These are artists who set the culture on its ear. Their art conjures previously unsuspected possibilities, energizing other artists by changing art's terms. Robert Irwin is such an artist.
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