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Robert Irwin Greenberg

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NEWS
November 18, 1996 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was nothing Cari Magnan enjoyed more than reclining in the Jacuzzi bathtub with a glass of champagne while gazing at the Pacific through the picture window of the plush three-bedroom home. The carpet was teal, the floors marble, and best of all for the unemployed Magnan, it was practically free. The Dana Point house, like tens of thousands in California, was in the limbo that precedes foreclosure. The owner had walked away, the home was empty and the mortgage holder had not yet taken over.
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NEWS
November 18, 1996 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was nothing Cari Magnan enjoyed more than reclining in the Jacuzzi bathtub with a glass of champagne while gazing at the Pacific through the picture window of the plush three-bedroom home. The carpet was teal, the floors marble, and best of all for the unemployed Magnan, it was practically free. The Dana Point house, like tens of thousands in California, was in the limbo that precedes foreclosure. The owner had walked away, the home was empty and the mortgage holder had not yet taken over.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 1990
An man who allegedly fraudulently obtained the financial histories of his father and another man and forged their signatures to lease two new cars has been arrested, authorities said Friday. Robert Irwin Greenberg, 39, of Lake Vista Drive, allegedly intended to sublease two new Nissan Maximas leased in the names of his father, a 66-year-old Monterey Park resident, and another man from El Toro, according to Sheriff's Department spokesman Richard J. Olson.
BUSINESS
November 10, 1996 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prosecutors in four California counties are using millions of dollars from a recent state law to fight real estate fraud, and more plan to take advantage of the statute. Orange County, however, isn't one of them. The county could pick up as much as $600,000 under the law, which allows county supervisors to tack a $2 fee on most real estate documents filed with local recorder's offices. The proceeds are strictly dedicated for combating real estate fraud.
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