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Robert Israel

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May 4, 1990 | DAVID SWEET, Sweet is a Los Angeles free-lance writer.
After Robert Israel played the organ for five silent movie comedies at a UCLA film class this spring, a sophomore confided her initial surprise to him. "I was expecting an old man to be sitting there," she said. "I was shocked to see how young you are." In a business that peaked in the 1920s and fell apart when sound pictures became dominant during the Depression, the 27-year-old Israel is an anomaly.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2004 | Matt Hurwitz, Special to The Times
"Isn't it terrific to see this many people coming out to see silent movies?" asked Playboy founder Hugh Hefner, looking out at the packed house in downtown's beautifully restored Orpheum Theater not long ago. Hefner was sponsoring, as he has for the last several years, an evening of the Los Angeles Conservancy's "Last Remaining Seats" series, which highlights the almost-forgotten downtown L.A. movie palaces by bringing them to life once each year.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1990 | ROBERT KOEHLER
If recent pop culture can be succinctly described, it might be called the Age of the Designer. It started with designer jeans, and now it's extended all the way to designer hand vacuums. The demand for designed goods, cars and living spaces are all telling signs of an ever-growing interest in how things look, and diminished interest in what's inside the package. We have all heard the dangers of form over substance in many areas of society, and it's also discussed in the theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1999 | JAN BRESLAUER, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
The wooden riverboat El Dorado sails slowly toward its destiny, carrying a cargo of yearning souls floating in a realm unmoored from space and time. The stoic vessel is a spare and geometric craft, void of unnecessary detail, formidable yet fragile. A crescent moon in a square box hangs by visible wires in the sky. There is no foliage to be seen, and yet the fecund jungle feels dangerously near. We are on the Amazon, of course, or perhaps any mythical river anywhere.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1999 | JAN BRESLAUER, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
The wooden riverboat El Dorado sails slowly toward its destiny, carrying a cargo of yearning souls floating in a realm unmoored from space and time. The stoic vessel is a spare and geometric craft, void of unnecessary detail, formidable yet fragile. A crescent moon in a square box hangs by visible wires in the sky. There is no foliage to be seen, and yet the fecund jungle feels dangerously near. We are on the Amazon, of course, or perhaps any mythical river anywhere.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2004 | Matt Hurwitz, Special to The Times
"Isn't it terrific to see this many people coming out to see silent movies?" asked Playboy founder Hugh Hefner, looking out at the packed house in downtown's beautifully restored Orpheum Theater not long ago. Hefner was sponsoring, as he has for the last several years, an evening of the Los Angeles Conservancy's "Last Remaining Seats" series, which highlights the almost-forgotten downtown L.A. movie palaces by bringing them to life once each year.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1987 | DONNA PERLMUTTER
Ambling along a corridor of the blocklong design shop operated by the Center Theater Group, Robert Israel doesn't cut the controversial figure his reputation suggests. Unassuming and impishly good-natured, the Obie award winner gives little hint of the post-modern maverick whose 1986 designs for Wagner's "Ring" in Seattle brought him volleys of both cheers and jeers; or even the controversial "Vienna: Lusthaus," which he did with theatrical innovator Martha Clarke the same year in New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1996
"The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari" (1919) and "Orlacs Hande" (1924), two silent films, will screen tonight at 7 at the Goethe-Institut, 5700 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 110. Pianist Robert Israel will accompany the films. Tickets for the double feature are $10 and refreshments will be provided. Reservations: (213) 525-3388.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1992
"Another Evening at the Silent Cinema," at 7 tonight, at Temple Beth Torah, will be composed of the Charlie Chaplin short "The Adventurer" (1917), Laurel & Hardy's 1928 short "You're Darn Tootin' " and the Buster Keaton feature "Neighbors" (1920). There will be live musical accompaniment by Robert Israel. The temple choir will also perform. Hot dogs, beverages and snacks will be included in the price of admission. Information: (818) 831-0835.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
"The Cure" and "Film Is Evil, Radio Is Good," two plays by Richard Foreman, won Obie awards Monday as the best new American plays produced Off Broadway or Off Off Broadway in the past year. The 32nd annual awards, with Morgan Freeman and Christine Lahti acting as hosts at the Ritz nightclub, were presented by the Village Voice. "The Hunger Artist" won four Obies, for Rob Besserer and Anthony Holland as performers, Paul Gallo for lighting design and Robert Israel for set and costume design.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1990 | ROBERT KOEHLER
If recent pop culture can be succinctly described, it might be called the Age of the Designer. It started with designer jeans, and now it's extended all the way to designer hand vacuums. The demand for designed goods, cars and living spaces are all telling signs of an ever-growing interest in how things look, and diminished interest in what's inside the package. We have all heard the dangers of form over substance in many areas of society, and it's also discussed in the theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1990 | DAVID SWEET, Sweet is a Los Angeles free-lance writer.
After Robert Israel played the organ for five silent movie comedies at a UCLA film class this spring, a sophomore confided her initial surprise to him. "I was expecting an old man to be sitting there," she said. "I was shocked to see how young you are." In a business that peaked in the 1920s and fell apart when sound pictures became dominant during the Depression, the 27-year-old Israel is an anomaly.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1987 | DONNA PERLMUTTER
Ambling along a corridor of the blocklong design shop operated by the Center Theater Group, Robert Israel doesn't cut the controversial figure his reputation suggests. Unassuming and impishly good-natured, the Obie award winner gives little hint of the post-modern maverick whose 1986 designs for Wagner's "Ring" in Seattle brought him volleys of both cheers and jeers; or even the controversial "Vienna: Lusthaus," which he did with theatrical innovator Martha Clarke the same year in New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1992 | KEVIN THOMAS
"Classics of the Italian Silent Cinema" continues tonight at 8 at LACMA's Bing Theater with Enrico Guazzoni's 1913 "Anthony and Cleopatra," which is nowhere near as complex as the remarkable "Cabiria." Nevertheless, it is entertaining, easy to follow and boasts stupendous sets, an eloquent sense of movement and a Queen of the Nile (Gianna Terribili Gonzalez) huskier than her handsome leading man (Amleto Novelli).
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2000 | SUSAN KING
Robert Israel, who composes and arranges music for silent films, has arranged a new score for the academy screening of "The Lost World." "I am arranging an original score, much how scores were done in the '20s," says Israel, who composed a new score last year for a restored four-hour version of "Greed." "Back then tons of music was being written for all different kinds of mood pieces that would last anywhere from a minute to five minutes even 10 minutes," he explains.
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