Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRobert J Corry
IN THE NEWS

Robert J Corry

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1996
Re "College Officials in the Hot Seat," Oct. 17: By putting Cal State Northridge President Blenda J. Wilson and another higher education official under oath and asking them if they were under the influence of drugs in testimony before an Oct. 16 Assembly budget subcommittee on education finance hearing, Chairman Bernie Richter (R-Chico) and subcommittee counsel Robert J. Corry conjured up disturbing parallels to the reprehensible tactics of Sen. Joseph McCarthy and Roy Cohn. Richter and Corry, who conducted the hearing on race and gender preferences in a thinly veiled attempt to promote Prop.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1996
Re "College Officials in the Hot Seat," Oct. 17: By putting Cal State Northridge President Blenda J. Wilson and another higher education official under oath and asking them if they were under the influence of drugs in testimony before an Oct. 16 Assembly budget subcommittee on education finance hearing, Chairman Bernie Richter (R-Chico) and subcommittee counsel Robert J. Corry conjured up disturbing parallels to the reprehensible tactics of Sen. Joseph McCarthy and Roy Cohn. Richter and Corry, who conducted the hearing on race and gender preferences in a thinly veiled attempt to promote Prop.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 17, 1996 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Even before anyone testified Wednesday, it was clear that Assemblyman Bernie Richter (R-Chico) wanted his "investigative" hearing on race and gender preferences to be unlike any other. For starters, the first witness, Cal State Northridge President Blenda J. Wilson, was sworn to tell the truth--a formality rarely employed in legislative hearings. Then, in a stunning departure from the norm, Wilson was asked whether she was on drugs.
NEWS
October 17, 1996 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Even before anyone testified Wednesday, it was clear that Assemblyman Bernie Richter (R-Chico) wanted his "investigative" hearing on race and gender preferences to be unlike any other. For starters, the first witness, Cal State Northridge President Blenda J. Wilson, was sworn to tell the truth--a formality rarely employed in legislative hearings. Then, in a stunning departure from the norm, Wilson was asked whether she was on drugs.
NEWS
October 24, 1996 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
In many ways, the hearing that Assemblyman Bernie Richter held Wednesday in Burbank was similar to those he chaired last week in Sacramento. Affirmative action was again the topic, particularly how the state's public colleges use race and gender in admissions and hiring. And again witnesses were sworn in and asked whether they were on drugs--a query that prompted one educator to confess: "I have Kleenex, a cough drop and I took a Claritan [antihistamine] this morning."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1995 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dealing another setback to government affirmative action programs, a Los Angeles judge has struck down a Metropolitan Transportation Authority policy of setting aside millions of dollars in contracts for minority- and women-owned firms. In declaring the policy unconstitutional, Superior Court Judge Dzintra I. Janavs cited the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling in June that government may not use "racial classifications" to award funds except to remedy proven past discrimination.
NEWS
March 17, 1995 | MAX VANZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Charging racial discrimination, a white student represented by a conservative legal foundation filed suit Thursday demanding that California's community college system open its special assistance classes designed for African Americans and Latinos to all students. Janice Camarena said at a Capitol news conference that she was ordered out of an English class at San Bernardino Valley College only because she was not an African American.
NEWS
October 23, 1996 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Led by Assembly Minority Leader Richard Katz, 25 Democratic lawmakers called Tuesday for Republican Assemblyman Bernie Richter to be censured for his "McCarthy-like tactics" and "disgusting, inexcusable behavior" during last week's hearings on affirmative action in higher education. In a letter to Speaker Curt Pringle, the Democrats said Richter was wrong to ask Cal State Northridge President Blenda J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1996 | Scott Harris
If you happened to be inside the Burbank City Council chambers Wednesday and heard Assemblyman Bernie Richter (R-Chico) assert that each and every witness to his committee hearing had been asked if they were under the influence of medication or drugs, I hereby testify that Richter is wrong. I have seen the video. Janine Jacinto wasn't asked that question. But everybody makes mistakes. I made one just the other day. It wasn't that I began a column by asking: "Is Bernie Richter on drugs?"
NATIONAL
November 16, 2008 | DeeDee Correll, Correll is a Times staff writer.
The first wave of trials for protesters arrested during the Democratic National Convention has resulted in a stream of acquittals in what the defendants are calling an embarrassment to Denver and proof that prosecutors ought to drop the rest of the cases. In trials for the first nine of 106 people arrested during the convention, all but two defendants have won acquittals on charges that they participated in anarchist demonstrations on the opening night of the convention.
NEWS
October 4, 1987 | MARCIA DUNN, Associated Press
They have the same disease, need the same transplant and know the frustrations of the same three-year wait, yet Frank Rowe questions a new national system for allocating precious organs and Terri Patrizio does not. The two, who need healthy hearts and lungs, and thousands who need other organs, have no choice but to wait, their futures on hold and their lives on the line. "My wife has the best line.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1996 | SCOTT HARRIS
If you happened to be inside the Burbank City Council chambers Wednesday morning and heard Assemblyman Bernie Richter assert that each and every witness at his committee hearing had been asked if they were under the influence of medication or drugs, I hereby testify that Richter is wrong. I have seen the video. Janine Jacinto wasn't asked that question. But everybody makes mistakes. I made one just the other day. It wasn't that I began a column by asking: "Is Bernie Richter on drugs?"
Los Angeles Times Articles
|