Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRobert J Dalley
IN THE NEWS

Robert J Dalley

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1989 | Mike Boehm
Robert J. Dalley was hooked in an instant when he heard the surf rock instrumental "Pipeline" barreling over the radio one day in 1963. Dalley, 15 at the time, bought an electric guitar with his paper route money and set out to become part of the instrumental surf music scene that crested during the early '60s, then ebbed with the arrival of the Beatles. But it was with a typewriter, rather than with a Fender Stratocaster, that Dalley ultimately wound up writing his chapter in surf rock history.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1989 | Mike Boehm
Robert J. Dalley was hooked in an instant when he heard the surf rock instrumental "Pipeline" barreling over the radio one day in 1963. Dalley, 15 at the time, bought an electric guitar with his paper route money and set out to become part of the instrumental surf music scene that crested during the early '60s, then ebbed with the arrival of the Beatles. But it was with a typewriter, rather than with a Fender Stratocaster, that Dalley ultimately wound up writing his chapter in surf rock history.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 8, 1989 | GERALD FARIS, Times Staff Writer
These days, Dave Stadler owns a company in Long Beach that finds new homes for people displaced by redevelopment projects. But as a 19-year-old in the early 1960s, the Manhattan Beach resident played bass guitar with the Vibrants, one of several South Bay teen surf bands that created a pulsating style of instrumental music that celebrated riding the waves from Ventura to San Diego County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1989 | GERALD FARIS, Times Staff Writer
These days, Dave Stadler owns a company in Long Beach that finds new homes for people displaced by redevelopment projects. But as a 19-year-old in the early 1960s, the Manhattan Beach resident played bass guitar with the Vibrants, one of several South Bay teen surf bands that created a pulsating style of instrumental music that celebrated riding the waves from Ventura to San Diego County.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1995 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
By day, Will Glover runs his own construction/demolition business, tearing out kitchens and the like. By night, he's spending his day money recording an album of country songs. A couple of times a month, he hits the country bars to perform or compete in talent contests. He's black and is trying to gain entry to a field that is almost exclusively white. That doesn't especially bother Glover. He's been there, done that.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1993 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dick Dale isn't the sort of person one would expect to cherish silence. Dale took the electric guitar, an already-raucous instrument as wielded by '50s blues men and rockabillys, and turned it into a noise machine that shrieked and sputtered, skidded and crashed. That was in the late 1950s and early '60s.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|