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Robert J Fitzpatrick

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1987 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, Times Staff Writer
More than anyone else, Robert J. Fitzpatrick created the Los Angeles Festival. To learn what motivates this high-energy, fast-moving arts impresario, The Times spent a 14-hour day trailing him June 11. It turned out to be one of the last typical full days Fitzpatrick spent putting the festival together, before going off to Paris for several weeks on his Euro Disneyland project. That day provided an inside look at the festival, which opens Thursday .
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BUSINESS
January 16, 1993 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Euro Disney, the Walt Disney Co. theme park near Paris that has struggled with softer than expected attendance and some anti-American backlash, on Friday announced that a French executive will take over the operation. Philippe Bourguignon, 45, previously second in command as Euro Disney's president, was named to succeed Robert Fitzpatrick as chairman effective April 12.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 1987 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, Times Staff Writer
From his office at the Walt Disney Studios in Burbank on Thursday, Robert J. Fitzpatrick, director of the Los Angeles Festival, confessed to being "a little battle weary. The festival is less than 10 days old, and it feels more like 10 weeks." The canceling of last Saturday night's performance of Michael Clark & Co. after the 25-year-old British choreographer and dancer came down with a high fever was a downer, Fitzpatrick acknowledged.
NEWS
October 21, 1989 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A French television journalist called it "The War of the Theme Parks." Actually, it is more like a massacre. An overweight giant, a barbarian wild boar hunter, a colony of blue elves and a clown all ganged up against a mouse. So far, the mouse is winning, without even striking a blow. When Walt Disney Co. announced plans to build its new $2.5-billion Euro Disneyland outside Paris for opening in 1992, it sparked a wild scramble of imitators all over France.
NEWS
March 30, 1985 | CATHLEEN DECKER, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles Olympic officials have taken the first step toward turning over part of the Games' massive surplus to help fund a permanent cultural fair patterned after the widely praised Olympic Arts Festival. The Los Angeles Olympic Organizing Committee's charitable foundation asked the state attorney general's office this week to allow it to provide money for future arts festivals, which are now under discussion by a blue-ribbon city committee.
NEWS
October 21, 1989 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A French television journalist called it "The War of the Theme Parks." Actually, it is more like a massacre. An overweight giant, a barbarian wild boar hunter, a colony of blue elves and a clown all ganged up against a mouse. So far, the mouse is winning, without even striking a blow. When Walt Disney Co. announced plans to build its new $2.5-billion Euro Disneyland outside Paris for opening in 1992, it sparked a wild scramble of imitators all over France.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1993 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Euro Disney, the Walt Disney Co. theme park near Paris that has struggled with softer than expected attendance and some anti-American backlash, on Friday announced that a French executive will take over the operation. Philippe Bourguignon, 45, previously second in command as Euro Disney's president, was named to succeed Robert Fitzpatrick as chairman effective April 12.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1996 | RANDY HARVEY and PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The lingering symbol of the 1984 Los Angeles Olympic Games--the statues of two nude, headless athletes at the peristyle entrance of the Coliseum--will remain undraped during the start of the Olympic torch relay Saturday morning.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
A gift of $3 million to California Institute of the Arts in Valencia from Roy and Patricia Disney and the Roy Disney Family Foundation was to be announced at a reception in the Modular Theatre at CalArts on Sunday night. Honoring a number of major donors to the arts conservatory, CalArts President Robert J. Fitzpatrick said $2 million of the Disney gift would go to CalArts' endowment fund and $1 million would be spent for operations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1987
California Institute of the Arts is a private university specializing in professional education in contemporary visual and performing arts. It is known for its unconventional graduation ceremonies. The school's African music dance ensemble led the graduation procession at 4 p.m. in the Graduation Courtyard on campus, 24700 W. McBean Parkway, Valencia. The graduation was the last for Robert J. Fitzpatrick, CalArts president since 1975, who has resigned to become president of Euro Disneyland.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 1987 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, Times Staff Writer
From his office at the Walt Disney Studios in Burbank on Thursday, Robert J. Fitzpatrick, director of the Los Angeles Festival, confessed to being "a little battle weary. The festival is less than 10 days old, and it feels more like 10 weeks." The canceling of last Saturday night's performance of Michael Clark & Co. after the 25-year-old British choreographer and dancer came down with a high fever was a downer, Fitzpatrick acknowledged.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1987 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, Times Staff Writer
More than anyone else, Robert J. Fitzpatrick created the Los Angeles Festival. To learn what motivates this high-energy, fast-moving arts impresario, The Times spent a 14-hour day trailing him June 11. It turned out to be one of the last typical full days Fitzpatrick spent putting the festival together, before going off to Paris for several weeks on his Euro Disneyland project. That day provided an inside look at the festival, which opens Thursday .
NEWS
March 30, 1985 | CATHLEEN DECKER, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles Olympic officials have taken the first step toward turning over part of the Games' massive surplus to help fund a permanent cultural fair patterned after the widely praised Olympic Arts Festival. The Los Angeles Olympic Organizing Committee's charitable foundation asked the state attorney general's office this week to allow it to provide money for future arts festivals, which are now under discussion by a blue-ribbon city committee.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1987
A Cirque du Soleil clown squirts a patron with his camera. His acrobatic friends dazzle with strength, agility and theatricality. Mimi, as one of our reporters wrote, dies on schedule in "La Boheme." A South African policeman confronts the injustice of the system that he serves. The theater-goer savors ancient epics in the Mahabharata, and new music and dance at venues all over town. The Los Angeles Arts Festival and its offspring, the Fringe Festival, are well under way.
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