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Robert J Irsay

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SPORTS
January 15, 1997 | From Associated Press
Robert Irsay, who in 1984 sneaked the Colts out of Baltimore in the middle of the night to Indianapolis, died today, more than a year after suffering a stroke. He was 73. Irsay, owner of the Indianapolis Colts, died at Indiana University Medical Center. He had been in and out of hospitals since suffering the stroke Nov. 29, 1995.
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SPORTS
October 9, 1990 | Times Wire Services
The NFL players' union Monday suggested all members of the news media, male and female, be barred from locker rooms and separate interview areas be set up to assure privacy for the players. "NFL players should be afforded absolute privacy in their locker rooms," Gene Upshaw, executive director of the NFL Players Assn., said in a statement from his union's headquarters in Washington, D.C. "They should not be expected or required to participate in media interviews unless fully clothed."
SPORTS
November 20, 1990 | Associated Press
Indianapolis Colt owner Robert Irsay apologized for referring to a television analyst as a "little Jewish boy." ESPN's Fred Edelstein reported that Colt Coach Ron Meyer would be fired at the end of the season and replaced by Raider assistant Mike White. Asked to comment on the report, Irsay said, "Edelstein's a little Jewish boy and he doesn't know what he's talking about."
SPORTS
July 1, 1990 | JIM MURRAY
When you're the general manager of a professional football team, you might have to work for an owner who is a woman, a corporation, a general partner, even a town. Or, if you're Jim Irsay, you might have to work for someone who is harder to please than any of them--your father. The Indianapolis Colts aren't so much a team as a migration. Their genealogy is harder to trace than the Hopi Indians'. Their origins are as obscure as an international spy's. They died twice. As the Baltimore Colts.
SPORTS
January 15, 1997 | From Associated Press
Robert Irsay, who in 1984 sneaked the Colts out of Baltimore in the middle of the night to Indianapolis, died today, more than a year after suffering a stroke. He was 73. Irsay, owner of the Indianapolis Colts, died at Indiana University Medical Center. He had been in and out of hospitals since suffering the stroke Nov. 29, 1995.
OPINION
December 27, 1987 | Doug Bandow, Doug Bandow is a senior fellow at the Cato Institute.
The nation's founders conceived of government as a night watchman, to do little more than protect life, liberty and property. Then, with the New Deal, government became a fiscal Santa Claus, redistributing income. Now, government is becoming a sports promoter. Rather like the ancient Roman empire, many states and localities entertain their citizens, guaranteeing the show will go on. Over the last 20 years governments have built or rebuilt 50 stadiums at a cost of $6 billion.
SPORTS
July 1, 1990 | JIM MURRAY
When you're the general manager of a professional football team, you might have to work for an owner who is a woman, a corporation, a general partner, even a town. Or, if you're Jim Irsay, you might have to work for someone who is harder to please than any of them--your father. The Indianapolis Colts aren't so much a team as a migration. Their genealogy is harder to trace than the Hopi Indians'. Their origins are as obscure as an international spy's. They died twice. As the Baltimore Colts.
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