Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRobert J Kelleher
IN THE NEWS

Robert J Kelleher

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2012 | By Claire Noland, Los Angeles Times
Robert J. Kelleher, who helped lead tennis into the modern open era while serving as president of the U.S. Lawn Tennis Assn. and who later became a U.S. District Court judge based in Los Angeles, has died. He was 99. Kelleher, who was also captain of the U.S. Davis Cup team in 1962 and 1963, died Wednesday at his Los Angeles home after a long illness, said his lifelong friend, former Mayor Richard Riordan. Before 1968, only players classified as amateurs were allowed to enter the major international tennis tournaments.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2012 | By Claire Noland, Los Angeles Times
Robert J. Kelleher, who helped lead tennis into the modern open era while serving as president of the U.S. Lawn Tennis Assn. and who later became a U.S. District Court judge based in Los Angeles, has died. He was 99. Kelleher, who was also captain of the U.S. Davis Cup team in 1962 and 1963, died Wednesday at his Los Angeles home after a long illness, said his lifelong friend, former Mayor Richard Riordan. Before 1968, only players classified as amateurs were allowed to enter the major international tennis tournaments.
Advertisement
SPORTS
January 26, 2000 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He spotted inherent hypocrisy and broke from the establishment, denouncing the "crooked" operations in his beloved sport. This could easily be about the present-day International Olympic Committee scandal. But it's about another momentous shift, in tennis more than 30 years ago, as one of its mavericks was honored Tuesday in New York. Robert J. Kelleher, a U.S. District Court judge in Los Angeles, former Davis Cup captain and former president of what is now the U.S. Tennis Assn.
SPORTS
January 26, 2000 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He spotted inherent hypocrisy and broke from the establishment, denouncing the "crooked" operations in his beloved sport. This could easily be about the present-day International Olympic Committee scandal. But it's about another momentous shift, in tennis more than 30 years ago, as one of its mavericks was honored Tuesday in New York. Robert J. Kelleher, a U.S. District Court judge in Los Angeles, former Davis Cup captain and former president of what is now the U.S. Tennis Assn.
NEWS
May 27, 1985 | WILLIAM OVEREND, Times Staff Writer
This isn't Burger King. We don't do it your way here. --Judge Manuel L. Real's favorite saying. The courtroom confrontation took place more than 30 years ago, but the most controversial federal judge in Los Angeles remembers it today as an early lesson in judicial style. Chief U.S. District Judge Manuel L. Real, then a young prosecutor, had decided that his only chance of winning a conviction before an unsympathetic judge was to demand a jury trial. But U.S. District Judge Pierson M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1990 | KIM KASH
A 25-year-old Oxnard resident has been sentenced to four years and three months in federal prison for robbing three area banks, FBI officials said. U.S. District Judge Robert J. Kelleher this week also sentenced Bruno Gilbert Torres to three years probation for robbing the three banks in Oxnard, Camarillo and Goleta. Torres pleaded guilty March 22 to three of nine federal bank robbery charges, said Gary Auer, FBI supervisory special agent. The remaining six charges were dropped.
NEWS
September 23, 1986
A Los Angeles federal judge Monday denied a request for a temporary injunction to block the trapping of red foxes at a national wildlife refuge within the Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station. The ruling cleared the way for resumption of a trapping program aimed at saving the endangered least tern and light-footed clapper rails, birds who live in a 1,100-acre salt marsh inside the 5,000-acre military base.
NEWS
April 14, 1989
Red foxes are fair game for government trappers at a national wildlife refuge in Orange County, a Los Angeles federal judge declared in finding that the foxes can be killed because they pose a significant threat to two endangered bird species. U.S. District Judge Robert J. Kelleher refused an animal rights' group's request for an injunction, pending a trial on the trapping program at the Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station. The Navy and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service had ordered the trapping and killing of several hundred of the non-native foxes since 1986 in an effort they say is essential to preserve two species of birds that nest in the 1,100-acre refuge on the naval base.
NEWS
December 2, 1986
The Pasadena-based Paracelsus Healthcare Corp. pleaded guilty to mail fraud before U.S. District Judge Robert J. Kelleher in connection with Medicare cost reports that failed to disclose business activities with related companies, U.S. Atty. Robert C. Bonner announced. The cost reports also included claims for expenses in acquiring new hospitals and other items not related to servicing patients, according to Assistant U.S. Atty. Brian J. Hennigan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1993 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The owner of a video store was given two weeks by a judge to shut down his business after federal marshals confiscated 1,387 pirated videotapes, authorities said Friday. Rene Gonzalez, owner of Odalys Video at 896 S. Harbor Blvd., has until Jan. 3 to sell his business. If he does not, it will be shut down by authorities, according to an order handed down Thursday by U.S. District Judge Robert J. Kelleher.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1988
A judge delayed sentencing Monday for a Vietnamese immigrant convicted of burning her money-losing Stanton restaurant to collect insurance benefits and gave her another month to try to prove she deserves a new trial. Nga Tuyet Nguyen, 49, has consistently maintained her innocence of mail fraud, arson and conspiracy charges. Last month, federal jurors convicted Nguyen, largely on the testimony of a former boyfriend, of burning her Au Bon Temps de Saigon restaurant in January.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1988
A Los Angeles federal judge has ruled that the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service can no longer require that children held in government custody be released only to their parents, relatives or guardians, a requirement viewed as a trap by INS critics. U.S. District Judge Robert J. Kelleher held in the windup of a 3-year-old case that the INS must now release an eligible minor to his parents, guardian, custodian, conservator or "other responsible party."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|