Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRobert Jarvik
IN THE NEWS

Robert Jarvik

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
April 27, 1987
Jarvik was chairman and chief executive of the Salt Lake City-based firm that manufactures and markets the artificial hearts he designed. In a release, the company said: "The board sincerely appreciates his many contributions to the company and recognizes his outstanding scientific accomplishments. The board wishes to emphasize that Jarvik's termination did not result from the recent tender offer for the company's common shares." E. M. Warburg Pincus & Co.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1987 | JENIFER WARREN
An Escondido man who earlier this month became the first patient in California to receive a Jarvik-7 mechanical heart was given a new human heart Sunday afternoon in a transplant at Sharp Memorial Hospital. Officials called the operation "very successful." Randy Dunlap, 34, was listed in critical condition after the six-hour surgical procedure, but hospital spokeswoman Cindy Cohagen said that "all signs are optimistic." "This is really a medical marvel," Cohagen said.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 10, 1985
A 52-year-old Swede, in a 10-hour operation at Karolinska Hospital in Stockholm, became the first person outside the United States to receive an artificial heart. The patient, who was not named, is "off the respirator, awake and talking," his doctors said. He received a metal and plastic Jarvik 7 artificial heart, named after its U.S. inventor, Robert Jarvik, who was present during the operation.
BUSINESS
April 27, 1987
Jarvik was chairman and chief executive of the Salt Lake City-based firm that manufactures and markets the artificial hearts he designed. In a release, the company said: "The board sincerely appreciates his many contributions to the company and recognizes his outstanding scientific accomplishments. The board wishes to emphasize that Jarvik's termination did not result from the recent tender offer for the company's common shares." E. M. Warburg Pincus & Co.
NEWS
November 3, 1986 | Associated Press
A 40-year-old man dying of heart failure received Britain's first artificial heart on Sunday to keep him alive until a human donor organ can be found, a hospital spokesman said. "The patient is reported to be stable and his immediate postoperative condition is satisfactory," said John Edwards, spokesman for Papworth Hospital in Cambridgeshire, north of London. The man, who was not identified, is the first person in Britain to receive a completely artificial heart.
NEWS
January 9, 1986 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
Artificial heart implants must comply with new monitoring and reporting restrictions that allow them to continue only with case-by-case approval from the government, the Food and Drug Administration announced Wednesday. In adopting the recommendations of a government advisory panel, the FDA imposed the restrictions because of a history of strokes and other complications among patients who have received the controversial Jarvik-7 artificial heart.
NEWS
January 4, 1987 | JANNY SCOTT, Times Staff Writer
Dr. Robert Jarvik's offices at Symbion Inc. are a monument to Robert Jarvik. The walls are decorated with glossy magazine covers about the man-made heart that bears his name. There he is on Italian men's Vogue--hair tousled, crooked smile, hand curled around "the Jarvik." But next door, in a funky building owned by the University of Utah, a smudged display case traces the artificial heart's bloodline. A dozen crude prototypes line the cupboard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1987 | JENIFER WARREN
An Escondido man who earlier this month became the first patient in California to receive a Jarvik-7 mechanical heart was given a new human heart Sunday afternoon in a transplant at Sharp Memorial Hospital. Officials called the operation "very successful." Randy Dunlap, 34, was listed in critical condition after the six-hour surgical procedure, but hospital spokeswoman Cindy Cohagen said that "all signs are optimistic." "This is really a medical marvel," Cohagen said.
BUSINESS
April 16, 1987 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., Times Staff Writer
Robert K. Jarvik, who once battled Washington to test the artificial heart, is fighting on another front. This time, it's a battle on Wall Street for control of Jarvik's company. Jarvik is chairman of Symbion Inc. of Salt Lake City, which makes the Jarvik-7 artificial heart and artificial ears. On Wednesday, he disclosed that he is opposed to an $8.8-million offer for control of Symbion by the New York City venture capital firm Warburg, Pincus Capital Co.
NEWS
January 4, 1987
1937: Soviet scientists implant the first artificial heart in a dog. 1957: Dr. Willem Kolff, in Cleveland, does the first dog implant in the Western world. 1960s: Numerous artificial hearts developed and implanted in calves and sheep, including a silicone rubber heart in Utah and a Teflon-coated steel heart in Cleveland. 1965: U.S. government begins funding artificial heart research, hoping for human implantation by 1970. 1967: Dr. Christiaan Barnard transplants the first human heart.
BUSINESS
April 16, 1987 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., Times Staff Writer
Robert K. Jarvik, who once battled Washington to test the artificial heart, is fighting on another front. This time, it's a battle on Wall Street for control of Jarvik's company. Jarvik is chairman of Symbion Inc. of Salt Lake City, which makes the Jarvik-7 artificial heart and artificial ears. On Wednesday, he disclosed that he is opposed to an $8.8-million offer for control of Symbion by the New York City venture capital firm Warburg, Pincus Capital Co.
NEWS
January 4, 1987 | JANNY SCOTT, Times Staff Writer
Dr. Robert Jarvik's offices at Symbion Inc. are a monument to Robert Jarvik. The walls are decorated with glossy magazine covers about the man-made heart that bears his name. There he is on Italian men's Vogue--hair tousled, crooked smile, hand curled around "the Jarvik." But next door, in a funky building owned by the University of Utah, a smudged display case traces the artificial heart's bloodline. A dozen crude prototypes line the cupboard.
NEWS
November 3, 1986 | Associated Press
A 40-year-old man dying of heart failure received Britain's first artificial heart on Sunday to keep him alive until a human donor organ can be found, a hospital spokesman said. "The patient is reported to be stable and his immediate postoperative condition is satisfactory," said John Edwards, spokesman for Papworth Hospital in Cambridgeshire, north of London. The man, who was not identified, is the first person in Britain to receive a completely artificial heart.
NEWS
January 9, 1986 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
Artificial heart implants must comply with new monitoring and reporting restrictions that allow them to continue only with case-by-case approval from the government, the Food and Drug Administration announced Wednesday. In adopting the recommendations of a government advisory panel, the FDA imposed the restrictions because of a history of strokes and other complications among patients who have received the controversial Jarvik-7 artificial heart.
NEWS
April 10, 1985
A 52-year-old Swede, in a 10-hour operation at Karolinska Hospital in Stockholm, became the first person outside the United States to receive an artificial heart. The patient, who was not named, is "off the respirator, awake and talking," his doctors said. He received a metal and plastic Jarvik 7 artificial heart, named after its U.S. inventor, Robert Jarvik, who was present during the operation.
BUSINESS
February 26, 2008 | From Reuters
Pfizer Inc. said Monday that it was voluntarily withdrawing advertising for its Lipitor cholesterol drug featuring Robert Jarvik, inventor of the Jarvik artificial heart, because its ads led to "misimpressions." The ads involving Jarvik had come under scrutiny, including from a House committee as part of an investigation into celebrity endorsements of prescription medicines.
NEWS
June 18, 1987 | United Press International
The Jarvik-7 artificial heart that saved the life of a Phoenix man two years ago was presented Wednesday to the Smithsonian Institution, and the former patient said he is glad people will be able to see "something that kept me alive." The $15,000 plastic-and-metal blood pump replaced the diseased heart of Michael Drummond, who was 25 when he underwent the operation on Aug. 29, 1985, at the University of Arizona Health Sciences Center in Tucson.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|