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Robert Jay Lifton

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October 12, 1986 | RICHARD EDER
There was a time when the world was widely regarded as flat, and it was thought dangerous to sail to its extremities for fear of falling off into some dreadful chasm. Nowadays, with round certainty, we go pretty much where we please and manage to come back. In terms of moral rather than physical geography, the roundness of our planet was thrown seriously into question by the Nazi Holocaust.
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NEWS
December 15, 2000 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Despite some surveys suggesting that the death penalty still enjoys a fair amount of support in America, Robert Jay Lifton and Greg Mitchell argue in "Who Owns Death?" that this ultimate form of punishment is on its way out. Laying out "the fact of actual executions" is the main point of "Who Owns Death?"
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NEWS
December 15, 2000 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Despite some surveys suggesting that the death penalty still enjoys a fair amount of support in America, Robert Jay Lifton and Greg Mitchell argue in "Who Owns Death?" that this ultimate form of punishment is on its way out. Laying out "the fact of actual executions" is the main point of "Who Owns Death?"
BOOKS
November 14, 1999 | ANTHONY DAY, Anthony Day is a contributing writer to Book Review
Walter Laqueur's "The New Terrorism" is gruesomely timely. Buford O. Furrow Jr., the angry, unemployed white supremacist who shot five people at a Los Angeles Jewish community center in August, is exactly the kind of terrorist Laqueur predicts the world will see more of. "Terrorism has taken some odd turns in the last couple of decades," Laqueur writes, "and the future will see it assume an even odder and more pathological complexion.
BOOKS
November 14, 1999 | ANTHONY DAY, Anthony Day is a contributing writer to Book Review
Walter Laqueur's "The New Terrorism" is gruesomely timely. Buford O. Furrow Jr., the angry, unemployed white supremacist who shot five people at a Los Angeles Jewish community center in August, is exactly the kind of terrorist Laqueur predicts the world will see more of. "Terrorism has taken some odd turns in the last couple of decades," Laqueur writes, "and the future will see it assume an even odder and more pathological complexion.
BOOKS
August 6, 1995 | Jonathan Kwitny, Jonathan Kwitny's latest book is "Acceptable Risks" (Simon & Schuster)
Twice in history, Aug. 6 and 9, 1945, cities were hit with bombs that killed hundreds of thousands of people. The United States dropped both bombs. We did it, we have been told, to save lives by bringing an unyielding Japan to its knees and ending World War II abruptly. But what if Gen. Eisenhower, Gen. MacArthur, Adm. Leahy, Gen. Bradley, and Adm. Nimitz--the top American brass in World War II--had all believed Japan would surrender in mid-1945 without our dropping atom bombs, and without an American invasion of Japan?
BOOKS
October 18, 1987
Physicians, trained as healers, became murderers in Nazi Germany as they "healed" the body of the German nation by eliminating the crippled, the insane and the racially "diseased." In Auschwitz, Nazi doctors presided over the murder of most of the one million victims of that camp. Doctors performed selections--both on the ramp among arriving transports of prisoners and later in the camps and on the medical blocks. Doctors supervised the killing in the gas chambers and decided when the victims were dead.
BOOKS
November 8, 1987
The winners of this year's Los Angeles Times Book Prizes write about irreconcilable differences--the difference between Blackfoot and White Man (James Welch), between Anglo and Latino (Paul Horgan), between German and Jew (Robert Jay Lifton), between Life and Non-life (Richard Dawkins), between Male and Female in a writer's mind (Kenneth S. Lynn), between Art and Nature in a painter's career (William Meredith).
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1995
I'm sorry, but the revisionists have got it wrong once again ("Fifty Years of Fallout," by Robert Jay Lifton and Greg Mitchell, July 30). They keep saying that Truman was incorrect in his decision to drop the atomic bomb. There weren't a million Americans that could have possibly been killed landing on Japan's beaches but only 100,000. Ask the mothers of those potential 100,000 victims what they think about the bomb. And what about the 250,000 Japanese who would have been killed in an invasion?
BOOKS
August 6, 1995 | Jonathan Kwitny, Jonathan Kwitny's latest book is "Acceptable Risks" (Simon & Schuster)
Twice in history, Aug. 6 and 9, 1945, cities were hit with bombs that killed hundreds of thousands of people. The United States dropped both bombs. We did it, we have been told, to save lives by bringing an unyielding Japan to its knees and ending World War II abruptly. But what if Gen. Eisenhower, Gen. MacArthur, Adm. Leahy, Gen. Bradley, and Adm. Nimitz--the top American brass in World War II--had all believed Japan would surrender in mid-1945 without our dropping atom bombs, and without an American invasion of Japan?
BOOKS
October 18, 1987
Physicians, trained as healers, became murderers in Nazi Germany as they "healed" the body of the German nation by eliminating the crippled, the insane and the racially "diseased." In Auschwitz, Nazi doctors presided over the murder of most of the one million victims of that camp. Doctors performed selections--both on the ramp among arriving transports of prisoners and later in the camps and on the medical blocks. Doctors supervised the killing in the gas chambers and decided when the victims were dead.
BOOKS
October 12, 1986 | RICHARD EDER
There was a time when the world was widely regarded as flat, and it was thought dangerous to sail to its extremities for fear of falling off into some dreadful chasm. Nowadays, with round certainty, we go pretty much where we please and manage to come back. In terms of moral rather than physical geography, the roundness of our planet was thrown seriously into question by the Nazi Holocaust.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1995
I was delighted to read "After Kobe, Healing the Psyche of Japan," on efforts being made to deal with post-traumatic stress disorder in Japan (June 20). I would like to bring to your attention, however, that these doctors were sent to Kobe by American Jewish World Service, a non-sectarian humanitarian aid and relief organization. At the request of Kwansei Gakuin University, we used a portion of the $85,000, raised from the Jewish American community in response to the earthquake to send specialists to train local psychologists and social workers working with the victims of the Kobe earthquake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1996
You carried a commentary ("The Presidents Have No Regrets," Aug. 4), by the apologists Robert Jay Lifton and Greg Mitchell, once again crying over our collective guilt in the dropping of two A-bombs on Japan. By coincidence, Book Review carried a review of "History Wars," a book of essays which helps to set the record straight. In my view, Hiroshima was not a "payback" for anything. War is hell, and the U.S. found the way to create a hell on Earth for its enemy before they could do the same to us. At least a million Japanese casualties had already resulted from the firebombing night raids of U.S. B-29s, which destroyed Tokyo, Osaka, Nagoya and Kobe.
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