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Robert Jr Morris

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NEWS
November 9, 1988 | PAUL DEAN, Times Staff Writer
John Killan Brunner would like to invite Robert Tappan Morris to England and pastoral Somerset and dinner at his country cottage. "I would serve him an excellent meal," Brunner promised. "Then I would pump him about computers."
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NEWS
November 9, 1988 | PAUL DEAN, Times Staff Writer
John Killan Brunner would like to invite Robert Tappan Morris to England and pastoral Somerset and dinner at his country cottage. "I would serve him an excellent meal," Brunner promised. "Then I would pump him about computers."
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1991 | JOHN GODFREY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
During Act II of Southeast Community Theatre's "Black Nativity," cast member Yolanda Kelker lets loose with a splendid exaltation: "This (church) may be leaking," she shouts, "but--Hallelujah!--it's still standing!" Kelker's celebratory emotional outburst captures the essence of Langston Hughes' gospel musical. So, too, does Southeast Community Theatre's production. "Black Nativity," directed by Floyd Gaffney, is a heartfelt, visceral and stunningly simple celebration of the Christmas story.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1992 | NANCY CHURNIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Five years ago, when director Floyd Gaffney debuted "Black Nativity" at the now-defunct Progressive Stage Company, the piece was extraordinary--in a raw and primitive way. There was no set, not much staging or, indeed, anything in the way of production values. But at a time when everyone else in San Diego was producing "white" Christmases, Langston Hughes' retelling of the birth of Christ through the music of black gospel singers was a refreshing and inspirational novelty.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1991 | JOHN GODFREY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
During Act II of Southeast Community Theatre's "Black Nativity," cast member Yolanda Kelker lets loose with a splendid exaltation: "This (church) may be leaking," she shouts, "but--Hallelujah!--it's still standing!" Kelker's celebratory emotional outburst captures the essence of Langston Hughes' gospel musical. So, too, does Southeast Community Theatre's production. "Black Nativity," directed by Floyd Gaffney, is a heartfelt, visceral and stunningly simple celebration of the Christmas story.
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