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Robert K Best

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NEWS
February 2, 1989
On a unanimous 5-0 vote, a Senate committee voted Wednesday to confirm Gov. George Deukmejian's appointment of Robert K. Best as new director of the state Department of Transportation. The Senate Rules Committee vote sent the 49-year-old Best's nomination to the floor of the Senate, where final confirmation is expected to be nothing more than a formality.
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NEWS
May 4, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Robert K. Best, director of the State Department of Transportation, will step down from his $99,805-a-year job. Best, 51, who has held his post since 1988, will be temporarily replaced by A. A. (Del) Pierce, undersecretary of the state Business, Transportation and Housing Agency. A nationwide search will be conducted to find a successor.
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NEWS
May 4, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Robert K. Best, director of the State Department of Transportation, will step down from his $99,805-a-year job. Best, 51, who has held his post since 1988, will be temporarily replaced by A. A. (Del) Pierce, undersecretary of the state Business, Transportation and Housing Agency. A nationwide search will be conducted to find a successor.
NEWS
February 2, 1989
On a unanimous 5-0 vote, a Senate committee voted Wednesday to confirm Gov. George Deukmejian's appointment of Robert K. Best as new director of the state Department of Transportation. The Senate Rules Committee vote sent the 49-year-old Best's nomination to the floor of the Senate, where final confirmation is expected to be nothing more than a formality.
NEWS
January 19, 1989 | DOUGLAS SHUIT and VIRGINIA ELLIS, Times Staff Writers
California Transportation Director Robert K. Best acknowledged Wednesday that political leaders have no coordinated vision of how the state's transportation system should be developed to meet the monumental traffic congestion problems of the present and future.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1989
Caltrans officials this week unveiled a billboard campaign warning drivers that highway crews will be working on extensive freeway widenings in Orange County during the next few years. During a ceremony this week, a billboard was unveiled near John Wayne Airport that contains a photograph of a highway crew at work with the slogan, "Give 'em a brake." About 500 of the billboards will be installed around the state this year, donated by a Los Angeles billboard advertising firm.
NEWS
July 26, 1990 | From the Associated Press
Two quake-damaged freeways that were scheduled to reopen this fall will not be ready for traffic for at least six more months, Caltrans officials said Wednesday. Caltrans Director Robert K. Best said there was no possibility the Central and Interstate 280 freeways--elevated roadways that carry 250,000 vehicles a day--could be reopened in October as promised only two weeks ago. The problem, he said, is that the work--expected to safely survive a magnitude 8.
REAL ESTATE
September 25, 1988
Current trends and solutions to problems in the industrial real estate field will be explored Tuesday at the 1988 Industrial Real Estate Conference at the Los Angeles Airport Marriott Hotel, 5855 W. Century Blvd. Among the speakers at the event sponsored by the American Industrial Real Estate Assn. are: Allen Moore, under secretary of commerce for international trade; Martha R. Seger, governor of the Federal Reserve System; Peter F. Allgeier, assistant U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 1988
Your editorial "Wrong Road: No on 74" (May 16) presented an inaccurate picture of the use of bonds to pay for improvements to our transportation facilities as authorized by Proposition 74 on the June ballot. Your comment that the bonds are expensive suggests that nothing is gained for the interest charges paid. The truth is that substantial benefits in saved lives, reduced accidents, and less congestion are achieved. Bonds allow critical projects to be built in advance of the receipt of funds and, therefore, to provide these benefits to the public many years earlier.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1988 | DOUGLAS SHUIT, Times Staff Writer
Deukmejian Administration officials Wednesday unveiled the prototype of a computer-equipped car that they hope ultimately will be part of the solution to California's traffic congestion problems. Tests of the car will begin on the Santa Monica Freeway this summer and continue into 1991. The experimental car shown here comes equipped with a dashboard-mounted console that displays an electronic map of Los Angeles city streets warning the driver of accidents and other congestion problems.
NEWS
January 19, 1989 | DOUGLAS SHUIT and VIRGINIA ELLIS, Times Staff Writers
California Transportation Director Robert K. Best acknowledged Wednesday that political leaders have no coordinated vision of how the state's transportation system should be developed to meet the monumental traffic congestion problems of the present and future.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1990 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN
Keith E. McKean, the first full-fledged director of the California Department of Transportation office in Orange County, has announced that he will retire Dec. 1. McKean, 65, said he had always intended to retire this year but was waiting for passage of Proposition 111, the gasoline tax hike approved by California voters in the June 5 primary. McKean has headed the Orange County District since 1988, following Robert H.
NEWS
October 26, 1989 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A top Caltrans engineer said Wednesday that he was exaggerating in an effort to win funding when he wrote in 1987 that a severe earthquake in the Los Angeles area could topple many bridges, killing more than 100 people. The memo written by James E. Roberts, chief of the department's structures division, did not contemplate the collapse of the Nimitz Freeway in Oakland or other structures of that kind, which are supported by multiple concrete columns.
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