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Robert K Bob Kerlan

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NEWS
September 14, 1992 | GARY LIBMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Elgin Baylor's first appointment with Dr. Robert Kerlan ended before it started. Waiting in Kerlan's lobby in the early 1960s, Baylor peered through a doorway and saw the orthopedist hunched over, apparently in severe pain. "He seemed to have a problem and couldn't even help himself," says the former Laker star. "I told the receptionist I was there for a cold and had come to the wrong doctor. And I left." When other doctors could not free his knees of pain, Baylor returned.
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NEWS
September 14, 1992 | GARY LIBMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Elgin Baylor's first appointment with Dr. Robert Kerlan ended before it started. Waiting in Kerlan's lobby in the early 1960s, Baylor peered through a doorway and saw the orthopedist hunched over, apparently in severe pain. "He seemed to have a problem and couldn't even help himself," says the former Laker star. "I told the receptionist I was there for a cold and had come to the wrong doctor. And I left." When other doctors could not free his knees of pain, Baylor returned.
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NEWS
February 15, 1990 | ANNE C. ROARK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's 5 p.m. at Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center, the hour when trouble begins. Gunfire on the streets and rush hour on the freeways mean the emergency room is filling up. In a crowded hallway no bigger than a closet, Dr. John Paul Harvey stands studying "the board," a brightly illuminated wall displaying the X-rays of children whose bones have been shattered by bullets and smashed between cars. As chief of pediatric orthopedics, it is Harvey's task to rebuild these fragile skeletons.
SPORTS
June 30, 1991 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He was 19 and sleeping in a foxhole near Bastogne, Belgium, when he was awakened by the rumble of German tanks. He was a soldier, but not a fighter. He was a country boy who would write letters to his parents about being scared to death. But there he was, looking up at German soldiers who had climbed out of those tanks and pointed their weapons at his head. He was captured. He and a buddy huddled together and watched as the rest of their platoon was captured as well. They stared at one another.
SPORTS
June 30, 1991 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He was 19 and sleeping in a foxhole near Bastogne, Belgium, when he was awakened by the rumble of German tanks. He was a soldier, but not a fighter. He was a country boy who would write letters to his parents about being scared to death. But there he was, looking up at German soldiers who had climbed out of those tanks and pointed their weapons at his head. He was captured. He and a buddy huddled together and watched as the rest of their platoon was captured as well. They stared at one another.
NEWS
February 15, 1990 | ANNE C. ROARK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's 5 p.m. at Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center, the hour when trouble begins. Gunfire on the streets and rush hour on the freeways mean the emergency room is filling up. In a crowded hallway no bigger than a closet, Dr. John Paul Harvey stands studying "the board," a brightly illuminated wall displaying the X-rays of children whose bones have been shattered by bullets and smashed between cars. As chief of pediatric orthopedics, it is Harvey's task to rebuild these fragile skeletons.
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