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Robert K Dole

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November 7, 1996
Although Bill Clinton hoped to win a majority of the popular vote, that goal eluded him as it had in 1992. Nevertheless, he did well enough among certain swing voters to carry him to victory--capturing moderates and independents. He also won all age groups and most education levels. Conservatives overwhelmingly went for Bob Dole, as did white born-again Christians.
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NEWS
November 23, 1996 | Associated Press
Defeated Republican presidential nominee Bob Dole met Friday with representatives of New York's IMG Inc. about possible deals for speeches, writing and product endorsement. "IMG is one of many entities seeking the honor and opportunity of representing Senator Dole," said Joyce Campbell, a Dole spokeswoman. "He is certainly keeping all options open about his future." Since the Nov. 5 election, Dole has appeared on CBS' "Late Night With David Letterman" and on NBC's "Saturday Night Live."
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NEWS
November 23, 1996 | Associated Press
Defeated Republican presidential nominee Bob Dole met Friday with representatives of New York's IMG Inc. about possible deals for speeches, writing and product endorsement. "IMG is one of many entities seeking the honor and opportunity of representing Senator Dole," said Joyce Campbell, a Dole spokeswoman. "He is certainly keeping all options open about his future." Since the Nov. 5 election, Dole has appeared on CBS' "Late Night With David Letterman" and on NBC's "Saturday Night Live."
NEWS
November 7, 1996
Although Bill Clinton hoped to win a majority of the popular vote, that goal eluded him as it had in 1992. Nevertheless, he did well enough among certain swing voters to carry him to victory--capturing moderates and independents. He also won all age groups and most education levels. Conservatives overwhelmingly went for Bob Dole, as did white born-again Christians.
NEWS
July 15, 1994 | DAVID LAUTER and EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Clinton Administration on Thursday unveiled its strategy for the next crucial phase of the battle over health care reform--attack Senate Minority Leader Bob Dole (R-Kan.). For months, White House officials have writhed in frustration as the "Clinton plan" became a label that a majority of Americans reject, even as polls show many continue to support key elements of what Clinton has proposed: universal coverage, requirements that companies provide insurance to workers and cost controls.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1986 | HEIDI EVANS, Times Staff Writer
Senate Majority Leader Robert K. Dole (R-Kansas), in Orange County last month to stump for fellow Republicans, was chatting with a handful of reporters and local congressmen when he turned to Rep. Robert E. Badham (R-Newport Beach) and inquired about his reelection bid. The 57-year-old, five-term incumbent shrugged off the question, telling Dole with a smile that he did not have much of race on his hands.
NEWS
July 15, 1994 | DAVID LAUTER and EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Clinton Administration on Thursday unveiled its strategy for the next crucial phase of the battle over health care reform--attack Senate Minority Leader Bob Dole (R-Kan.). For months, White House officials have writhed in frustration as the "Clinton plan" became a label that a majority of Americans reject, even as polls show many continue to support key elements of what Clinton has proposed: universal coverage, requirements that companies provide insurance to workers and cost controls.
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