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Robert Kidder

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BUSINESS
May 21, 2009 | Ken Bensinger
Chrysler is not yet out of bankruptcy, but it already has a new boss lined up. The automaker, which filed for Chapter 11 three weeks ago, said Wednesday that Robert Kidder would become its chairman once it emerges as a new company merged with Italian automaker Fiat. Kidder, the former chairman and chief of Borden Chemical and current head of investment firm 3Stone Advisors, will succeed current Chrysler Chairman and Chief Executive Robert Nardelli.
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BUSINESS
May 21, 2009 | Ken Bensinger
Chrysler is not yet out of bankruptcy, but it already has a new boss lined up. The automaker, which filed for Chapter 11 three weeks ago, said Wednesday that Robert Kidder would become its chairman once it emerges as a new company merged with Italian automaker Fiat. Kidder, the former chairman and chief of Borden Chemical and current head of investment firm 3Stone Advisors, will succeed current Chrysler Chairman and Chief Executive Robert Nardelli.
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BUSINESS
April 15, 1994
The $203.1 million that Walt Disney Co. Chairman Michael Eisner pulled down last year was the highest pay ever for a chief executive of a public corporation, Business Week magazine reported Thursday. He earned nearly four times more than the second-highest-paid executive in 1993, Sanford Weill, head of Travelers Corp., who earned $52.8 million. Eisner, long among the highest-paid executives, earned the amount despite the fact that Disney's profit fell last year.
BUSINESS
November 5, 2009 | Peter Whoriskey, Whoriskey writes for the Washington Post.
AUBURN HILLS, Mich. -- Chrysler, the U.S. automaker that has come closer to annihilation than any of its rivals, rolled out its new five-year business plan Wednesday, saying it intends to become "a great public company once again." Now managed by and partly owned by Fiat, the Italian automaker, Chrysler desperately needs new cars to build its laggard sales, according to a number of analysts. So far this year, its sales are down nearly 40%. "The top priority is to invest to create a compelling brand and product offering," C. Robert Kidder, Chrysler's board chairman, said in remarks prepared for a six-hour presentation to industry analysts and reporters.
NEWS
May 11, 1990
Even though Mother's Day is Sunday, good ol' mom isn't the only one on the minds of teen-agers when they search for heroes and role models. Hot Topics asks, "What person do you most admire and why?" "Women everywhere who have kids and either work or volunteer and still maintain an image of being sane--specifically my mother." Sunny Winkler, 17, senior, Connelly "What person do I admire? I think I admire everyone I like--doesn't everybody?
BUSINESS
May 30, 2009 | Jerry Hirsch
You own an auto company. What do you do now? The Obama administration -- and by default, taxpayers -- must answer that question now that the federal government is about to take big stakes in two of the nation's storied industrial companies and their joint financing arm. Based on the latest bankruptcy and bailout plans, the government will hold 72.5% of General Motors Corp., 8% of Chrysler Corp. and 35% or more of GMAC Financial Services, the car loan business.
BUSINESS
May 15, 1987 | DEBRA WHITEFIELD, Times Staff Writer
Ralph D. DeNunzio announced Thursday that he will resign as chief executive of the major investment firm Kidder, Peabody & Co. and that the second-ranking official will leave the company altogether in a shake-up that marks the latest casualty of Wall Street's insider trading scandal. DeNunzio, who will stay on as chairman to oversee the management transition, will be replaced as chief executive by Silas S.
FOOD
October 19, 2005 | Russ Parsons, Times Staff Writer
WHEN his fellow Santa Rita Hills winegrowers gather later this month to honor Richard Sanford with a big tribute dinner, the question on everyone's lips will almost surely be: "What the heck happened?" Sanford is a seminal figure in California wine. He pioneered the red-hot Santa Rita Hills growing area just north of Santa Barbara 35 years ago, planting the legendary Sanford and Benedict vineyard when it was surrounded by nothing but cattle and cabbage.
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