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ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1993
Re the TV review " 'J. Edgar Hoover': Dirt Shown Out of Context," by Robert Koehler (Feb. 9): Koehler refers to me as "Hoover pal Luisa Stuart." I was never a "pal" of Hoover! LUISA STUART-HYUN Oxnard
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1996
In order of preference: 1. "A Bright Room Called Day," Cypress College (March). A rare staging of Tony Kushner's superb early play about Weimar Germany was college theater-making at the highest level. 2. "Tartuffe," Shakespeare Orange County, Orange (August). Ron Campbell was a brilliant amalgam of Rasputin and a coyote-trickster in one of this company's wiliest and smoothest productions. 3. "La Posada Magica," South Coast Repertory, Costa Mesa (December). The L.A.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1988
In his article on Greta Scacchi (" 'Mischief's' Scacchi Likes Good Roles as Bad Girls," May 10), Robert Koehler mentions Scacchi conjuring ". . . an image George Hurrell would have wanted to photograph." From his use of tense here, one would guess that Koehler thinks that Hurrell is no longer with us. Not only is Hurrell alive and well, but guess what?--he's still working. I would imagine that if Scacchi wanted to be photographed by Hurrell, she could contact him and arrange for a session.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1995
How disappointing that Robert Koehler finds comfort in the treatment of Thomas Jefferson's relationship with his slave, Sally Hemings, as a "rumored affair" ("Doblmeier Sticks to the Facts in 'Thomas Jefferson,' " Calendar, April 28). I suppose--in Koehler's mind--Jefferson would need to be different in some way from the preponderance of male slaveholders who forcibly used/coerced their female chattel sexually. What is really priceless is that--in his relief that Jefferson only owned slaves (but couldn't possibly have forced them to sleep with him)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1992
I was surprised to read Robert Koehler's review of the play "Nothing Human Disgusts Me" (April 24) without any reference to the origin of the title. The title is derived from Terence, "Heauton Timoroumenos," Act 1, Scene 1, Line 25: "( Homo sum: ) Humani nihil a me alienum puto ." Either this information was edited out, or Koehler does not know his classics. Incidentally, the Latin words " Humani nihil a me alienum puto " are used as a motto by the Devereux Foundation, an organization in Devon, Pa., for helping retarded children.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1995
How disappointing that Robert Koehler finds comfort in the treatment of Thomas Jefferson's relationship with his slave, Sally Hemings, as a "rumored affair" ("Doblmeier Sticks to the Facts in 'Thomas Jefferson,' " Calendar, April 28). I suppose--in Koehler's mind--Jefferson would need to be different in some way from the preponderance of male slaveholders who forcibly used/coerced their female chattel sexually. What is really priceless is that--in his relief that Jefferson only owned slaves (but couldn't possibly have forced them to sleep with him)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1988
How sad it is to wake up on a Sunday morning, pick up The Times and find the front pages filled with violence around the world, the Metro section filled with violence in our neighborhoods and the Calendar pages filled with the violence of a critic's tongue ("Land of the Blockbuster," by Robert Koehler, Feb. 7). I didn't realize until that morning that my three visits to see "Daddy's Dying" were such an awful thing to do. How could I have subjected myself and my friends to such a retrograde experience?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1992
In response to Robert Koehler's review of Golden West College's production of "Verdict" ("Golden West Finishes Off a Sickly 'Verdict'," Calendar July 1), I have a few comments on the role of the critic. Throughout the history of art, the artist and critic have had a complex relationship. While the artist struggles to create, to build something from nothing, the critic stands back and judges the creation, dismantling it piece by piece. In a sense, it could be said that the critic is a parasite of the artist, for while the critic cannot survive without the artist--without the art there is no critique--the artist can survive very well, and in fact flourish without the critic.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1996
In order of preference: 1. "A Bright Room Called Day," Cypress College (March). A rare staging of Tony Kushner's superb early play about Weimar Germany was college theater-making at the highest level. 2. "Tartuffe," Shakespeare Orange County, Orange (August). Ron Campbell was a brilliant amalgam of Rasputin and a coyote-trickster in one of this company's wiliest and smoothest productions. 3. "La Posada Magica," South Coast Repertory, Costa Mesa (December). The L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1993
Although it's their appellation, "The Way Off Players" doesn't fully do justice to the resident comedy sketch group at Way Off Broadway Playhouse in Santa Ana. "Waaaaaay Off" is more like it. And although its the title of the group's latest evening of sketches, "In Search of Love" doesn't cut it either. "In Search of a Show" rings much, much truer. Now, if director Tony Reverditto and his would-be merry band were doing their act in a living room for friends, no one would object.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1993 | ROBERT KOEHLER
Ah, there's nothing quite like that ever-unpredictable, topsy-turvy, will-'o-the-wisp phenomenon known as Garden Grove theater. The "serious" theater in town, GroveShakespeare, does a light Noel Coward ("Private Lives") that only a few people liked, runs out of cash and time, and dies as it is preparing "King Lear." The "not-so-serious" theater in town, the Garden Grove Community Theatre, does a chestnut ("Ten Little Indians") in a subversive manner, and is filling the house.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1993
Although it's their appellation, "The Way Off Players" doesn't fully do justice to the resident comedy sketch group at Way Off Broadway Playhouse in Santa Ana. "Waaaaaay Off" is more like it. And although its the title of the group's latest evening of sketches, "In Search of Love" doesn't cut it either. "In Search of a Show" rings much, much truer. Now, if director Tony Reverditto and his would-be merry band were doing their act in a living room for friends, no one would object.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1993
Re the TV review " 'J. Edgar Hoover': Dirt Shown Out of Context," by Robert Koehler (Feb. 9): Koehler refers to me as "Hoover pal Luisa Stuart." I was never a "pal" of Hoover! LUISA STUART-HYUN Oxnard
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1993 | ROBERT KOEHLER
Almost from the moment we sat down, we started to worry about the Laguna Playhouse production of Sam Shepard's "True West." Jacquie Moffett's suburban kitchen set looks awfully big for an older home in Duarte--roughly the area of the play (and where Shepard spent a lot of time growing up). And the opening line--this corner's pick for funniest of any post-'60s play ("So Mom took off for Alaska, huh?")--was pretty much lost. Bad signs.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1992
In response to Robert Koehler's review of Golden West College's production of "Verdict" ("Golden West Finishes Off a Sickly 'Verdict'," Calendar July 1), I have a few comments on the role of the critic. Throughout the history of art, the artist and critic have had a complex relationship. While the artist struggles to create, to build something from nothing, the critic stands back and judges the creation, dismantling it piece by piece. In a sense, it could be said that the critic is a parasite of the artist, for while the critic cannot survive without the artist--without the art there is no critique--the artist can survive very well, and in fact flourish without the critic.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1992
I was surprised to read Robert Koehler's review of the play "Nothing Human Disgusts Me" (April 24) without any reference to the origin of the title. The title is derived from Terence, "Heauton Timoroumenos," Act 1, Scene 1, Line 25: "( Homo sum: ) Humani nihil a me alienum puto ." Either this information was edited out, or Koehler does not know his classics. Incidentally, the Latin words " Humani nihil a me alienum puto " are used as a motto by the Devereux Foundation, an organization in Devon, Pa., for helping retarded children.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1993 | ROBERT KOEHLER
Almost from the moment we sat down, we started to worry about the Laguna Playhouse production of Sam Shepard's "True West." Jacquie Moffett's suburban kitchen set looks awfully big for an older home in Duarte--roughly the area of the play (and where Shepard spent a lot of time growing up). And the opening line--this corner's pick for funniest of any post-'60s play ("So Mom took off for Alaska, huh?")--was pretty much lost. Bad signs.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1988
In his article on Greta Scacchi (" 'Mischief's' Scacchi Likes Good Roles as Bad Girls," May 10), Robert Koehler mentions Scacchi conjuring ". . . an image George Hurrell would have wanted to photograph." From his use of tense here, one would guess that Koehler thinks that Hurrell is no longer with us. Not only is Hurrell alive and well, but guess what?--he's still working. I would imagine that if Scacchi wanted to be photographed by Hurrell, she could contact him and arrange for a session.
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