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Robert Kourik

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1991 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Pacific Palisades resident Barbara Edelman does the family laundry, the 35 gallons of water used to wash and rinse each load is not allowed to simply gurgle away down the drain. Instead, she diverts the used water from her washing machine to a white plastic tank in her laundry room. And by plugging in a pump connected to her garden hose, she can make the sudsy, grayish liquid do double duty.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1991 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Pacific Palisades resident Barbara Edelman does the family laundry, the 35 gallons of water used to wash and rinse each load is not allowed to simply gurgle away down the drain. Instead, she diverts the used water from her washing machine to a white plastic tank in her laundry room. And by plugging in a pump connected to her garden hose, she can make the sudsy, grayish liquid do double duty.
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NEWS
March 16, 2000 | ROBERT SMAUS, TIMES GARDEN EDITOR
Question: What can I do about the green color showing up on the soil in my yard? It is quite pervasive. Is there anything I can do to help the soil? Also my yard is quite shady, so how much should I water? --E.C., Encino Answer: You have almost answered your first question with the second, by mentioning how shady your garden is.
NEWS
September 5, 1987 | ROBERT SMAUS
Everyone wonders what to do with the lawn and--continuing with my list of basic reference books--I most often look in the Western Edition of Ortho Books, "All About Lawns." It takes an entire book to deal with lawns and their multitude of requirements and problems, and this one manages to present the science of turf management in readable fashion. The many garden books published by Ortho, H. P.
HOME & GARDEN
September 5, 1998 | JOHN MORELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's a giant in your yard. Each day it gets a little bigger and hungrier until eventually it threatens to overtake your property. But unlike the giants in fairy tales, this one is going to take more than a beanstalk to get rid of. And you're probably not willing to part with it anyway.
NEWS
February 4, 1989 | Robert Smaus
It's beginning to look like a repeat of last year--late fall being quite wet and satisfying; winter being quite dry and unsettling. If so, the drought still is with us and again will command our attention this summer.
REAL ESTATE
December 20, 1992 | ROBERT SMAUS, TIMES GARDEN EDITOR
Hint, hint . . . a gardener can always use a good book, especially at this time of the year. It's the perfect gift when the days are short and nights indoors are so long. Visit a bookstore and you'll find no shortage of garden books on the shelves, but note that precious few are practical for Californians, who eventually tire of looking dreamily at lush English or Eastern landscapes spread across several acres. "Hey," we should say to the proprietors, "ever hear of California, or the drought?"
REAL ESTATE
October 8, 1995 | ROBERT SMAUS, TIMES GARDEN EDITOR
QUESTION: What could be causing the black, rotten areas on the bottoms of my tomatoes? --L.W., Santa Monica ANSWER: Brown-black blotches on the blossom end of green or red tomatoes are a physiological disease (not caused by microorganisms) called blossom end rot, according to the U.C. Extension publication, "Pests of the Garden and Small Farm." They are caused by a lack of calcium, but adding calcium does not help because blossom end rot is caused by salts in the soil or erratic watering.
REAL ESTATE
July 30, 1995 | ROBERT SMAUS, TIMES GARDEN EDITOR
Drip irrigation, of one kind or another, is the near-perfect way to water a long, narrow bed of flowers or low shrubs. It's easier to install than sprinklers (no digging trenches) and about 15% more efficient with water. But many people have a hard time maintaining or even understanding drip systems. The biggest question is: "How long do I leave them on," since you can't see the ground getting wet.
REAL ESTATE
October 12, 1997 | ROBERT SMAUS, TIMES GARDEN EDITOR
QUESTION: I have a ligustrum hedge. Lately, it is growing leaves that are green but curling. Some turn yellow and have spots as well. I have tried spraying to no effect. Could you give me some advice? --G.I., Pacific Palisades ANSWER: Usually, curling leaves indicate some kind of sucking insect, like aphids or thrips, which is surprising because privet, or Ligustrum japonicum, is one of the more bullet-proof plants. The dwarf Texas privet, L.
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