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Robert Krulwich

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NEWS
September 29, 1991 | SUSAN KING
PBS looks at American pop culture with its new series "Edge." The network says "Edge" will attempt to offer viewers "a daring, thoughtful vision of what makes America tick." The monthly series is hosted by the witty Robert Krulwich, the economic and business correspondent for CBS News and "CBS This Morning," and a frequent contributor to National Public Radio and The New York Times.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2011 | James Rainey
The two guys who headline public radio's long-running show on "science, wonder and discovery" can't wait for their first national tour. Declares Jad Abumrad, the hipster and technical whiz: "We're going to have the full-on groupies and the destroyed hotel rooms. Everything. " Rejoins his mike-mate, one-time ABC television science reporter Robert Krulwich: "I'm looking more for the wrapped fruit. " That sort of counter-punching and drollery is just one of the charms of "Radiolab," a favorite on more than 300 public radio stations and now on the verge of selling out stage shows in New York, Seattle and Los Angeles.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2011 | James Rainey
The two guys who headline public radio's long-running show on "science, wonder and discovery" can't wait for their first national tour. Declares Jad Abumrad, the hipster and technical whiz: "We're going to have the full-on groupies and the destroyed hotel rooms. Everything. " Rejoins his mike-mate, one-time ABC television science reporter Robert Krulwich: "I'm looking more for the wrapped fruit. " That sort of counter-punching and drollery is just one of the charms of "Radiolab," a favorite on more than 300 public radio stations and now on the verge of selling out stage shows in New York, Seattle and Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2005 | From Associated Press
Robert Krulwich, a reporter who was a favorite on the Ted Koppel incarnation of ABC's "Nightline," is returning to National Public Radio. Krulwich started at NPR as an economics reporter in 1978 before leaving for CBS News in 1985. He joined ABC News nearly a decade later and his work is known for colorful takes on complex subjects. He once penned an opera to explain "What does the Federal Reserve do exactly?"
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1999 | HOWARD KURTZ, THE WASHINGTON POST
Robert Krulwich may be the only newsman who would attempt to illustrate the brain of a pancake-flipping short-order cook--and do it by creating a huge contraption enveloping two goofy-looking guys in goggles and helmets. Or hire the rock band They Might Be Giants to compose a song about getting old. Or hold up a phone to bystanders in Battery Park and ask how many rings it will take until they get annoyed. All in one show. "It's fairly high-risk," the ABC correspondent says.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2005 | From Associated Press
Robert Krulwich, a reporter who was a favorite on the Ted Koppel incarnation of ABC's "Nightline," is returning to National Public Radio. Krulwich started at NPR as an economics reporter in 1978 before leaving for CBS News in 1985. He joined ABC News nearly a decade later and his work is known for colorful takes on complex subjects. He once penned an opera to explain "What does the Federal Reserve do exactly?"
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Robert Krulwich, who contributes clever pieces on economics to "CBS Morning News," was mentioned by the Washington Post Monday as a possible replacement should commentator Andy Rooney, who refused to cross picket lines in the continuing Writers Guild strike, decide not to return to "60 Minutes"--or if Rooney has the decision made for him.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1987
CBS News is expected to name a little-known correspondent, Harry Smith, as Kathleen Sullivan's co-anchor on the division's new morning program that will premiere on Nov. 30, network sources said Friday. Smith, CBS' correspondent in Dallas, formerly worked for KMGH-TV, the network's affiliate in Denver. CBS News spokesman Tom Goodman said an announcement on a co-anchor will be made soon, but he declined further comment.
NEWS
September 12, 2002 | MARK SACHS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fans of ABC News' straight-talking "Nightline" program can check out the show's kookier cousin tonight at 10 on KCET. "Life 360" is going after a younger, hipper demographic by slicing and dicing a single topic each week and then jazzing up the results with humor, computer graphics and a heaping helping of attitude. "Nightline" veterans Dan Morris and Michel Martin are on hand as executive producer and host, respectively, but what they've come up with is at best a mixed bag.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1992 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
PBS has notified the producers of "Edge," an innovative pop-culture series, that the network will not renew its $2-million grant for next season--a decision that probably spells extinction for the 6-month-old show. A monthly magazine hosted by Robert Krulwich, "Edge" has been praised by TV critics as hip, engaging programming since its premiere last October. It had been seen by both PBS and WNET executives as a way to attract younger viewers to public television.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1999 | HOWARD KURTZ, THE WASHINGTON POST
Robert Krulwich may be the only newsman who would attempt to illustrate the brain of a pancake-flipping short-order cook--and do it by creating a huge contraption enveloping two goofy-looking guys in goggles and helmets. Or hire the rock band They Might Be Giants to compose a song about getting old. Or hold up a phone to bystanders in Battery Park and ask how many rings it will take until they get annoyed. All in one show. "It's fairly high-risk," the ABC correspondent says.
NEWS
September 29, 1991 | SUSAN KING
PBS looks at American pop culture with its new series "Edge." The network says "Edge" will attempt to offer viewers "a daring, thoughtful vision of what makes America tick." The monthly series is hosted by the witty Robert Krulwich, the economic and business correspondent for CBS News and "CBS This Morning," and a frequent contributor to National Public Radio and The New York Times.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1994 | ROBERT KOEHLER
Poor Bruce Babbitt. The Secretary of Interior was twice a contender for an Associate Supreme Court Justice position but remained in his current post because of his value to President Bill Clinton. But his current job means that he must forever contend with one of the country's most unbending, virulent interest groups: Business people who make money off of Western lands.
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