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Robert Kubey

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NEWS
April 29, 1990 | ANNE C. ROARK
Many formal education programs have been developed in colleges and universities in recent years in the art of the electronic media, and research suggests that such curricula can be effective.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 29, 1990 | ANNE C. ROARK
Many formal education programs have been developed in colleges and universities in recent years in the art of the electronic media, and research suggests that such curricula can be effective.
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NEWS
April 29, 1990 | ANNE C. ROARK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Television is by far the most popular of all American pastimes, but it is also more likely than any other leisure activity to leave people passive, tense and unable to concentrate, according to a major new set of studies to be released Monday. Supported by the National Institute of Mental Health, the Spencer Foundation and other private nonprofit organizations, the studies show that it takes more skill and concentration to eat than it does to watch television.
NEWS
April 29, 1990 | ANNE C. ROARK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Television is by far the most popular of all American pastimes, but it is also more likely than any other leisure activity to leave people passive, tense and unable to concentrate, according to a major new set of studies to be released Monday. Supported by the National Institute of Mental Health, the Spencer Foundation and other private nonprofit organizations, the studies show that it takes more skill and concentration to eat than it does to watch television.
OPINION
February 17, 2002
Let's say you're talking foreign policy with Colin Powell (or whispering sweet nothings to your sweetheart) when Bullwinkle Moose appears on a television in the room. If your attention wanders to the screen, you're hardly alone. As the authors of research published in this month's Scientific American admit, they too often find themselves succumbing to the tube's almost occult ability to seize people's attention and not let go.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1990 | KEVIN BRASS, Free-lance writer Kevin Brass covers the media for the Times San Diego County edition.
According to an oft-quoted recent study, part of a book entitled "Television and the Quality of Life: How Viewing Shapes Everyday Experience," a normal viewer will become more passive, tense and unable to concentrate if he sits and watches, say, five hours of "Gilligan's Island." It took psychologists only 13 years to reach this conclusion. I'm willing to go a step further than the study, even though I don't have a grant from the National Institute of Mental Health.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1991 | BERKLEY HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Adam Knoedler still wears diapers and can barely say Mommy and Daddy. But when the blond toddler--born just two years and three months ago--takes the Nintendo controls, he dodges Venus fly traps, slays fireball-spewing dragons and smashes Mario-eating mushrooms. Adam's quick little thumbs have guided him through the complicated, computerized video game called Super Mario Bros. 3, although he sometimes stumbles at the more difficult levels.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2010 | By Keith Thursby, Los Angeles Times
Carroll Pratt, an Emmy-winning sound engineer who also worked with the inventor of the laugh track and spent decades adding laughter and other effects to a variety of shows, has died. He was 89. Pratt died of natural causes Thursday at Santa Rosa Memorial Hospital in Santa Rosa, north of San Francisco, said his son, Scott Ouchida-Pratt. Pratt was working as a re-recording mixer at MGM in the early 1950s when he was approached by Charles Rolland Douglass, who invented the Laff Box, which was basically a series of audiotape loops.
HOME & GARDEN
January 31, 2008 | Jeff Spurrier, Special to The Times
IT'S not too late to snag a great seat for Super Bowl XLII on Sunday. In fact, you may be sitting in it right now, remote control at hand and TiVo quivering in anticipation. The Super Bowl is the television event of the year -- more than 93 million viewers in 2007 -- and threat of recession notwithstanding, more Americans will watch the game on new LCD and plasma screens than ever before.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1991 | RICHARD MAHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
While they wait for such popular roller coasters as Viper and Ninja, visitors at Six Flags Magic Mountain in Valencia are being entertained this summer by closed-circuit TV shows running cartoons, movie clips, basketball highlights and ads for acne cream. When their city was selected as host of the 1996 Summer Olympic Games, scores of Atlantans learned about the decision while watching a live-TV broadcast as they stood in supermarket checkout lines.
NEWS
May 20, 1993 | DANIEL CERONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The laughs are over at my favorite bar, Cheers, My giggles and chuckles have now become tears. Turn over the bar stools, Dim down the lights . . . . Where will I hang out on Thursday nights? "I had to express myself somehow, express my feelings that a part of my life was closing down," said Human Numan, a flip New York deejay turned sentimental poet by the imminent death of his favorite TV show.
NEWS
April 27, 1990 | BOB SIPCHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The young counselor listened carefully to the desperate call. With the calm compassion of a radio psychologist, she offered her advice: "You have to squat down on all the colored blocks, and when you squat on a really unusual one, something strange is going to happen." The calls for help come at all hours. A 4 a.m. plea from a shy child in South Central Los Angeles. An afternoon call from a frustrated housewife on New York's Upper East Side.
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