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Robert Kuhn

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1991 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Dr. Robert and Helen Kuhn's Los Angeles-based collection of African art will be offered for sale Nov. 20 at Sotheby's New York. The auction house has estimated the value of the 140 objects to be sold at $2.8 million to $3.9 million. The highlight of the sale is a 12th-Century terra cotta sculpture from Mali depicting a mythic animal, thought to be a ram. The graceful, 31-inch-tall figure--one of fewer than a dozen of its type--is valued at $250,000 to $350,000.
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BUSINESS
December 11, 1998 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
PolyGram Filmed Entertainment chief Michael Kuhn on Thursday became the first executive casualty in PolyGram's movie division stemming from Seagram Co.'s $10.4-billion takeover of the music and film giant. Sources said executives from Seagram's Universal Studios Inc. unit told Kuhn of their decision Wednesday on the eve of Thursday's formal takeover of PolyGram. Sources said Kuhn, who led music giant PolyGram's push into Hollywood, is so far the only executive to lose his job.
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BUSINESS
December 11, 1998 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
PolyGram Filmed Entertainment chief Michael Kuhn on Thursday became the first executive casualty in PolyGram's movie division stemming from Seagram Co.'s $10.4-billion takeover of the music and film giant. Sources said executives from Seagram's Universal Studios Inc. unit told Kuhn of their decision Wednesday on the eve of Thursday's formal takeover of PolyGram. Sources said Kuhn, who led music giant PolyGram's push into Hollywood, is so far the only executive to lose his job.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1991 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Dr. Robert and Helen Kuhn's Los Angeles-based collection of African art will be offered for sale Nov. 20 at Sotheby's New York. The auction house has estimated the value of the 140 objects to be sold at $2.8 million to $3.9 million. The highlight of the sale is a 12th-Century terra cotta sculpture from Mali depicting a mythic animal, thought to be a ram. The graceful, 31-inch-tall figure--one of fewer than a dozen of its type--is valued at $250,000 to $350,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2009 | Dennis McLellan
Bob Keane, who founded the West Coast independent label Del-Fi Records in the 1950s and is best known for discovering and recording rock legend Ritchie Valens, has died. He was 87. Keane, who survived non- Hodgkins lymphoma diagnosed when he was 80, died of renal failure Saturday in an assisted living home in Hollywood, said his son, Tom Keane. "He was like the original independent record man in those days," said Tom Keane, a songwriter and record producer. "He was the guy going out and finding talent and developing it and getting it out to the masses.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1995 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"The Cure," a well-acted heart-tugger about two 11-year-old boys, one of whom has AIDS, works as a drama on friendship and its challenges, but has too many loose ends, too much that hasn't been thoroughly thought out. Where many films fall apart toward the finish, "The Cure" gets into gear at last but too late to redeem earlier flaws. It opens with a vexing vagueness that undercuts all that follows.
BUSINESS
September 14, 2000 | E. SCOTT RECKARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Geneva Group Inc., a broker for sales of small and mid-size companies, agreed Wednesday to be acquired by Citigroup Inc. for a reported $200 million in stock. Geneva, based in Irvine since its founding as a mergers-and-acquisition firm in 1977, will become a separately operated part of Citigroup's Salomon Smith Barney, a major provider of services for wealthy individuals.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1995
Movie reviewer Kevin Thomas assaults the sensitive feature "The Cure," saying it "has too many loose ends, too much that hasn't been thoroughly thought out" (Calendar, April 21). While the film may bend the usual paint-by-numbers rules of movie making, I found it a wonderfully enlightening exploration into the relationship of a young boy with AIDS (Dexter) and his new and only friend (Erik), a seemingly insensitive young man with a compassionless, abusive alcoholic mother. Thomas felt compelled to learn the actual location of the action and the reasons for the boys' mothers' move to the small town.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1999 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
If he'd been on the Titanic, fewer lives would have been lost. If he'd accompanied Robert Scott to the South Pole, the explorer would have lived to be 100. That's how good Hugh Grant is at rescuing doomed ventures. And while "Mickey Blue Eyes" was never going to be a certifiable disaster, Grant goes a long way toward saving it from itself. Starring Grant, James Caan and Jeanne Tripplehorn, "Mickey Blue Eyes" follows "Analyze This" and "Mafia!"
BUSINESS
October 16, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sanwa Bank California has appointed Romolo C. Santarosa to the position of vice president and controller. Santarosa, 39, will be responsible for the bank's accounting policies and operations in addition to overseeing all financial reporting practices. He will be based at the bank's Los Angeles headquarters. Previously, Santarosa served as corporate controller for Shawmut National Corp., parent company for New England-based Shawmut Bank. * Tenet Healthcare Corp. has appointed Michael H.
NEWS
February 4, 1993 | DICK WAGNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joe Gutierrez, big-shouldered and big-hearted, was a legend on Longworth Avenue. He would help anybody, any time, especially the homeless who wandered over to his house from the nearby railroad tracks. Last week, that house was destroyed by a fire that authorities say was deliberately set. Gutierrez, 66, was found dead inside, and Orville Adrian Evans, 35, a transient, was arrested the next day and booked on suspicion of murder.
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