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Robert Kuok

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BUSINESS
September 13, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Murdoch to Sell Media Stake to Malaysian Tycoon: Media baron Rupert Murdoch plans to sell almost 35% of Hong Kong's South China Morning Post group to Robert Kuok, a Malaysian billionaire who has close relations with the Colony's future rulers in China, the daily said early today. Ending a week of wild rumors, the South China Morning Post said Kuok had agreed to pay Murdoch's News Corp. $349 million for the 34.9% stake. After the deal is completed, Murdoch will still have 15.
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NEWS
May 27, 1995 | MAGGIE FARLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Larry Feign's cartoon, "The World of Lily Wong," often brought a smile or two over breakfast with its satire of daily life and politics in Hong Kong. But the cartoon has disappeared from the territory's most prominent newspaper. The South China Morning Post's editor, David Armstrong, blames "budgetary reasons" for the decision late last week to drop the popular feature--and indeed the paper subsequently laid off 25 reporters and editors, even though its profit margin is a healthy 52%.
NEWS
February 4, 1994 | CHRISTINE COURTNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As most of the media here keep a wary eye on China in the prelude to this British colony's return to Chinese sovereignty in 1997, a new English-language newspaper is promising editorial independence. The arrival this week of Eastern Express, Hong Kong's third English-language newspaper, coincides with a growing concern over the political orientation of the colony's newspapers and television networks. Oriental Press Group Ltd.
NEWS
November 8, 2000 | JIM MANN, Jim Mann's column appears in this space every Wednesday
One of the slow, little-noticed changes in U.S. policy toward Asia has been the way Hong Kong has gradually faded from the picture. On July 1, 1997, when Britain returned its former crown colony of Hong Kong to China, American policymakers, both in the Clinton administration and in Congress, were full of ringing declarations of support for the preservation of Hong Kong's freedoms.
NEWS
December 8, 2000 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nowhere in Asia is the pulse of media freedom monitored with greater scrutiny or worry than in this rich and unique corner of China. Two recent episodes have raised the level of concern. The back-to-back and apparently unconnected incidents involved a very public tirade against the Hong Kong media by Chinese President Jiang Zemin in October, followed last month by the resignation of a prominent columnist.
NEWS
October 19, 1993 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four years before it is scheduled to assume control of this prosperous British colonial enclave, the mainland Chinese government is sending a chilling message to journalists here: The days of a free press in Hong Kong are numbered. The problem is that what the Hong Kong press corps calls a "scoop," Communist leaders in Beijing often term treason. The kind of journalistic stealth that sometimes brings merit raises and journalism prizes in Hong Kong can carry a jail term inside China.
NEWS
August 1, 1995 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fifty years ago, the first atomic bombs fell on Japan, ending World War II and rolling up the khaki-clad legions of Japanese troops who had imposed a "Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere" from the Aleutians to the islands off Australia to the frontiers of India. But today the Japanese are back on the march, and a new co-prosperity sphere has emerged. Built by corporate cadres in dark suits, their loyalty shifted from the country to the company, it dwarfs anything imagined by wartime leaders.
NEWS
November 29, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES ASIA ECONOMICS CORRESPONDENT
In times past, Asian business people could judge the outlook for their own companies by watching the economy of the United States, their biggest export market. More recently, they watched Japan. Now, a third locomotive of growth has burst forth on the Asian scene. "China has become an engine, and the principal one for the Pacific region," Lawrence Krause, a professor at the University of California, San Diego, wrote in the annual prospectus of the Pacific Economic Cooperation Council.
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