Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRobert L Chesney
IN THE NEWS

Robert L Chesney

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1992
A deaf activist convicted in the biggest fraud case of its kind in U.S. history was sentenced to two years in prison this week, fined $50,000 and ordered to repay nearly $90,000 of the $400,000 he took. Robert L. Chesney, 60, was convicted in December on 20 counts of filing false claims, converting money for his own use and money laundering. He must repay $88,532 to the government for misappropriating retirement and disability benefits by using fake identification cards.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1992
A deaf activist convicted in the biggest fraud case of its kind in U.S. history was sentenced to two years in prison this week, fined $50,000 and ordered to repay nearly $90,000 of the $400,000 he took. Robert L. Chesney, 60, was convicted in December on 20 counts of filing false claims, converting money for his own use and money laundering. He must repay $88,532 to the government for misappropriating retirement and disability benefits by using fake identification cards.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1991 | LAURIE BECKLUND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a so-called "silent statement" from jail, a deaf man accused of perpetrating the largest single fraud in Social Security history claims that he carried out his three-year scheme as a protest on behalf of the handicapped. "First let's make it clear that Robert L. Chesney is not a crook, nor a criminal," Chesney wrote in a letter received by The Times on Monday. "He is a Crusader, a Demonstrator, a Protester, an Activist--dedicated . . . to Civil Rights and Advancement of the Handicapped."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1991 | LAURIE BECKLUND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After less than three hours of deliberation, a federal jury on Friday convicted Robert L. Chesney, 60, a miserly deaf man, of using numerous fake ID cards to pull off what authorities described as the biggest individual Social Security fraud in U.S. history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1991 | LAURIE BECKLUND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After less than three hours of deliberation, a federal jury on Friday convicted Robert L. Chesney, 60, a miserly deaf man, of using numerous fake ID cards to pull off what authorities described as the biggest individual Social Security fraud in U.S. history.
NEWS
August 31, 1991 | LAURIE BECKLUND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To all outward appearances, Robert L. Chesney was an impoverished deaf man, one of hundreds of elderly and disabled residents at the federally subsidized Angelus Plaza downtown who lived from one government check to another. Neighbors said that if he stood out in any way, it was because of a single vanity: To cover his baldness, he always wore a pale blue fishing hat.
SPORTS
July 1, 2006
Sepp Blatter says the World Cup has the best and most qualified referees. I'd hate to see the ones who didn't make the cut. ETHAN FINGEROTE Spring Valley Lake I read with astonishment Grahame L. Jones' view that the referee was to blame for the Portugal-Netherlands fiasco. Funny, I didn't see the referee kick anyone nor waste time. If the players are childish, stupid and violent, do not blame the referee. ROBERT L. CHESNEY Simi Valley After watching all the yellow and red cards being handed out in the World Cup, at least now I realize that not all the lousy referees work in the NBA. RALPH S. BRAX Lancaster Such writhing and grimacing and rolling around Those brave World Cup players just drop to the ground.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1991 | LAURIE BECKLUND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a so-called "silent statement" from jail, a deaf man accused of perpetrating the largest single fraud in Social Security history claims that he carried out his three-year scheme as a protest on behalf of the handicapped. "First let's make it clear that Robert L. Chesney is not a crook, nor a criminal," Chesney wrote in a letter received by The Times on Monday. "He is a Crusader, a Demonstrator, a Protester, an Activist--dedicated . . . to Civil Rights and Advancement of the Handicapped."
NEWS
August 31, 1991 | LAURIE BECKLUND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To all outward appearances, Robert L. Chesney was an impoverished deaf man, one of hundreds of elderly and disabled residents at the federally subsidized Angelus Plaza downtown who lived from one government check to another. Neighbors said that if he stood out in any way, it was because of a single vanity: To cover his baldness, he always wore a pale blue fishing hat.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|